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J44

whole house humidification

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Im so undecided. We are switching from oil to gas. With a. Hot air furnace. Im being. Told. That were gonna need some sort of humidification in the air. But not for. 2400 dollar s lol I would rather put one of those humidifier s in the bedroom at night my concerns. Are that the extra moisture in the air is gonna make the house to wet feeling and smelling. And then what happens to my ducts with the added moisture ....so confused. On what to do.

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The whole house one is ok but you have to clean it a lot. It looks like a germ factory after a couple weeks.

I change the screen on mine once a year. I have an april aire one, I need it due to my wood stove that I run.

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Its are first winter in the house so not really sure how dry its gonna be. I like the idea of a separate unit. Placed in the living area of the house. Finished basement really dont need any extra moisture I live on long island. Im also burning wood. And it does get very dry

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Its are first winter in the house so not really sure how dry its gonna be. I like the idea of a separate unit. Placed in the living area of the house. Finished basement really dont need any extra moisture I live on long island. Im also burning wood. And it does get very dry

get yourself a hygrometer to measure the inside humidity. I have one and try to keep it around 45% humidity.

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70 & 45% is OK when it's mild out but 45% RH @ 70 has a dew point of 47 degrees, when it's real cold out its easy to start to condense moisture on the windows. The better whole house humidifiers have an outdoor sensor that will back down the target RH as the outdoor temperature drops.

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70 & 45% is OK when it's mild out but 45% RH @ 70 has a dew point of 47 degrees, when it's real cold out its easy to start to condense moisture on the windows. The better whole house humidifiers have an outdoor sensor that will back down the target RH as the outdoor temperature drops.

true on this,

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70 & 45% is OK when it's mild out but 45% RH @ 70 has a dew point of 47 degrees, when it's real cold out its easy to start to condense moisture on the windows. The better whole house humidifiers have an outdoor sensor that will back down the target RH as the outdoor temperature drops.
hit the nail on the head,I would recommend a steam unit on 208/230 volt.much better quality than water wheel type.

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Those steam units require alot of maintenance if you have hard water also.

They do but , I have found using a pre filter with a deionized filter helps significantly, these units will provide better results and are much better than water type humidifiers.

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An even easier way is to bring combustion air to the heating system from outside, tighten the house up and you don't need to add moisture to keep the home from drying out. Humidifiers are really just a bandaid on a shotgun wound.

 

I have to table top models that we might bring out a few times a winter, don't think they were used at all last year. Reduce the infiltration and the moisture from cooking, showers and your toilet(s) should be all you need.

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Ed are you talking about. Direct vent cause that's what im going with. So I can get. 95 percent efficiency. We have those. Table top humidifier s. And I like them. Really only used. While sleeping.

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Yes I am, by definition direct vent means 2 pipes, 1 intake and 1 exhaust. Pulling combustion air from the house increases infiltration and that In turn reduces the amount of moisture in the house.

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Has anyone ever hear of a company needing a work permit from the town. To. Install a gas furnace. Here's what I did. I called home depot and signed up for. There 24 month no interest credit card. They sent a contractor here he wants me to have paperwork notarized. So he can get a permit. Sounds strange I dont want my taxes going up because. I switch from oil to gas. I all ready have a gas unit for the upstairs. Thanks again for any insight

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