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TatonkaJames

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America Pays More For Internet, Gets Slower Speeds, Than Other Countries

 

Americans pay far more and get far less when it comes to the Internet than many other people around the world. But a few small towns might be changing that.

 

Internet users in Seoul continue to get the speediest connections at the lowest prices anywhere in the world, with speeds of one gigabit per second costing just $30 a month, according to annual report released Thursday the New America Foundation’s Open Technology Institute. By contrast, the best speeds that consumers in Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., or New York can get are half as fast and cost $300 a month.

 

The report looked at the cost and speed of Internet service in 24 cities in the United States and abroad. Many of the report’s findings -- like the fact that broadband is faster and cheaper in several Asian cities like Seoul, Hong Kong and Tokyo than in American cities -- are similar to findings from previous years.

 

But new entrants to the U.S. broadband market are starting to close the gap between America and the rest of the world.

 

For example, Chattanooga, Tennessee, which built the country’s first citywide gigabit-per-second Internet network in 2010, has slashed the price of its ultra-fast service from $300 a month to $70 a month. Google’s new gigabit service, Google Fiber, which is available in Kansas City, also costs $70 a month, the report found.

Gigabit Internet connections are up to 100 times faster than what many Americans receive today. Consumers who can get such service don't have to worry about videos buffering or websites loading. They can share large files in seconds and take advantage of new offerings in online education and health care that require fast access.

 

Google is looking to expand its gigabit broadband service to several mid-size cities like San Antonio and Portland, but it is not expected to arrive in New York or Washington, D.C., in the near future, according to the Washington Post.

 

The New America Foundation's report highlights how city-owned networks are becoming more competitive with the offerings from Internet providers around the world. The small number of towns that have built such networks -- like Chattanooga and Lafayette, Louisiana --- ranked higher in the report on speed and price than almost every other city except for those in Asia.

 

"In general, our research shows that these locally-owned networks tend to deliver better value to their customers when compared on a price-per-megabit basis to competing cable and telecom providers in their own cities," the report said.

 

Lafayette has cut the cost of its city-owned service from around $1,000 per month to $110 per month in a single year, the report found.

Advocates for municipal broadband say there is not enough competition in the market for major companies to offer faster service at cheaper rates. They argue that local governments should be able to provide their own networks, especially in rural areas where most cable companies won't deliver Internet service because it is not profitable.

 

But many cities are banned from creating their own Internet service. At least 19 states have passed laws restricting publicly owned broadband networks, according to the Institute for Local Self-Reliance. Supporters of city-owned Internet networks say the laws, and the lawmakers who support them, have been backed by major Internet providers trying to limit competition.

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Government provided broadband...????? No Thank you....!!!!!!

 

What's wrong with you? Think how much money it will save us to have all our information just sent directly to homeland security instead of having to subpoena it from private ISP services. It would be much more efficient to just plug you right into the DHS data mining facility with all your internet traffic.

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What's wrong with you? Think how much money it will save us to have all our information just sent directly to homeland security instead of having to subpoena it from private ISP services. It would be much more efficient to just plug you right into the DHS data mining facility with all your internet traffic.

 

My only concern in that regard would be if my unusually high page clicks in the "just racks" thread in the tavern could get me in trouble.... I would be more concerned with getting the "motor vehicle" client service model during connection outages...

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Like it isn't already. Try thinking once in a while.

 

Damn. So you think your internet traffic information goes directly to the department of homeland security already. Awesome. Nice hat you have there.

 

1821470

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You guys have to understand that in faster countries, there is ONE state-approved architecture which makes it more efficient and faster.

 

In the United States, the FCC sees a need for competition. That's why you have service providers who have T1, cable, satellite, and increasingly fiber.

 

This is kind of analogous to wireless phone and data service.

 

In Europe, GSM multiplexing is the standard in many countries.

 

Here in the states we have CDMA, TDMA, and GSM for example.

 

These competing standards make for more costly and sometimes slower service.

 

It's ironic that competition makes for slower service, but the upshot is that our networks are not as vulnerable to attacks and disruptions that other countries would be.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Robert Williams View Post

Damn. So you think your internet traffic information goes directly to the department of homeland security already. Awesome. Nice hat you have there.

 



yeah that's pretty silly,



he totally ignored the middle men who handed it over,



then got immunity.


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Damn. So you think your internet traffic information goes directly to the department of homeland security already. Awesome. Nice hat you have there.

 

 

 

yeah that's pretty silly,

he totally ignored the middle men who handed it over,

then got immunity.

 

Oh wait. I see you think all your internet traffic gets sent to DHS, too. You must have used a whole roll of tinfoil to make yours.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Robert Williams View Post

Oh wait. I see you think all your internet traffic gets sent to DHS, too



translation,


"Let me tell you what you think and why you are stupid for thinking it"


is that sort of Troll the best you can do?



really?


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THE NSA HAS BECOME THE LARGEST, MOST COVERT, AND POTENTIALLY MOST INTRUSIVE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY EVER.

 

Flowing through its servers and routers and stored in near-bottomless databases will be all forms of communication, including the complete contents of private emails, cell phone calls, and Google searches, as well as all sorts of personal data trails—parking receipts, travel itineraries, bookstore purchases, and other digital “pocket litter.” It is, in some measure, the realization of the “total information awareness” program created during the first term of the Bush administration

 

(forgot to underline some)

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