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notimetopiss

How do you read the beach/conditions at night?

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Scouting a new area during the day is the best way if possible. If not, watching where waves break is helpful, certain lures may bump bottom at certain depths, that can be helpful too. Also, try google earth, not the best but you can find out quite a bit with that.

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If there is whitewater it's no problem reading the water at night. To be honest if there is no whitewater your chances of catching go down significantly anyway..... By watching the whitewater you should be able to find the ends of bars and cuts. When it comes to open beach fishing those are the best places to fish.

 

Oh, Almost forgot.... The beach your casting from will tell you a lot about the water depth in front of you. A steep beach is likely to be deeper. If you find some areas where you get a big drop off in the sand it could be very deep. Also look for humps and V shapes in the sand along the wash line. Those can also indicate outflows and rips.

 

John

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try to keep your night eyes.  try not to use your headlamp to walk out to a spot and minimize the time you do have it on.   that will help.  most of the time you can see the water conditions regardless of light.


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watch the waves. watch them before they curl and during the curl and break. they will tell you how deep an area is. understand the relationship between a wave and bottom contour.

try and understand how soft structure forms around key hard structures like jetties, piers, pilings and inlets/rivers.

look at the sand you are standing on. gradual slope indicates a shallower more gradual slope underwater.

steeper beach usually means a steep dropoff to deeper water and most likely a mature trough/bar.

get out during the day and watch at different tide stages.

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another thing you can do that i didn't see mentioned is put on a plug you can really feel working, like a big old metal lip or bottle or something like that. toss it in a spot you think has some decent moving water and just take up the slack and wait for a bit to see if there is any sweep. or if the plug is getting pushed in towards you and you have to keep reeling to stay in contact, try dropping the rod tip to both your left and right side while you reel up the slack. you should definitely find more current in one direction or the other (a direction in which it is easier to stay in contact with the plug), or else you might be around slack tide. likewise you can cast to 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock and try the same thing with dropping the rod tip. if you can't feel any difference, go to a different spot, that one is no good.

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