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Charles Barkley: 'Unintelligent' Blacks 'Brainwashed' To Keep Successful Black Men Down

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I remember similar talk about Colin Powell,Condie Rice,and Herman Cain from Banana Boat song Harry.I have to ponder what is black enough? A prison record...The thug lifestyle...A bunch of kids from different baby'mommas that are fed and clothed by government programs?


"There's an old saying," Belafonte said. "In the days of slavery, there were those slaves who lived on the plantation and [there] were those slaves that lived in the house. You got the privilege of living in the house if you served the master ... exactly the way the master intended to have you serve him.


 



NBA Hall of Famer Charles Barkley spoke candidly about the problems facing the black community when appearing on a Philadelphia radio station, accusing “unintelligent,” “brainwashed” African-Americans of keeping successful ones down.



While appearing on “Afternoons with Anthony Gargano and Rob Ellis,” Barkley was asked about a rumor that Seattle Seahawks QB Russell Wilson was getting criticism from his black teammates for not being, quote, “black enough.”



Barkley went on a long monologue on the subject: ”Unfortunately, as I tell my white friends, we as black people, we’re never going to be successful, not because of you white people, but because of other black people. When you’re black, you have to deal with so much crap in your life from other black people. It’s a dirty, dark secret; I’m glad it’s coming out.”



Barkley said that young black men who do well in school are accused of “acting white” by their peers. “One of the reasons we’re never going to be successful as a whole, because of other black people. And for some reason we are brainwashed to think, if you’re not a thug or an idiot, you’re not black enough. If you go to school, make good grades, speak intelligent, and don’t break the law, you’re not a good black person. And it’s a dirty, dark secret.”



“There are a lot of black people who are unintelligent, who don’t have success,” he continued. “It’s best to knock a successful black person down because they’re intelligent, they speak well, they do well in school, and they’re successful…”



“We’re the only ethnic group who say, 'Hey, if you go to jail, it gives you street cred.’ It’s just typical BS that goes on when you’re black, man.”



[h/t Bias Breakdown]



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Reports: Some teammates think QB Russell Wilson isn't black enough




By Ryan Wilson | CBSSports.com


October 24, 2014 10:08 AM ET




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Russell Wilson has thrown 10 touchdowns and just 2 interceptions this season. (Getty Images)
Russell Wilson has thrown 10 touchdowns and just 2 interceptions this season. (Getty Images)


Earlier this week, Bleacher Report's Mike Freeman wrote about the ongoing saga in Seattle in the wake of the Percy Harvin trade. Specifically, some Seahawks players think third-year quarterback Russell Wilson is too close to the front office, and doesn't always take blame for his mistakes.



Then there's this: "There is also an element of race that needs to be discussed," Freeman wrote. "My feeling on this -- and it's backed up by several interviews with Seahawks players -- is that some of the black players think Wilson isn't black enough."



We talked about Wilson's blackness on the Eye on Football podcast, which you can listen to by hitting play on the episode (10/22) below (and that led to this tweet). But on Thursday's SportsCenter, Kenny Mayne added this to Freeman's story:



“Two sources — one inside the team, one outside of the underachieving 3-3 Seahawks — tell me that much of what was written in Mike Freeman's Bleacher Report column is true,” Mayne said, via PFT. “(Freeman) wrote of turmoil involving since-traded Percy Harvin and the quarterback Russell Wilson that led to a more widespread internal battle pitting those for Russell Wilson and those against.

"And Freeman surmised on his own an issue among some teammates regarding Wilson that quote, 'he isn't black enough.' A certain expected behavior based on color, apparently. One of the sources told me, quote, I don't know how he got all that stuff, but it's pretty much true. We do have a divide. We're working on it. Thursday that notion was not presented to Wilson, but over and again, questions came about Harvin's departure.”



First, as PFT's Mike Florio points out, Freeman didn't "surmise" this. It was his feeling "backed up by several interviews with Seahawks players." Second, "that notion" was presented to Wilson.



“There's no division in our locker room,” the third-year quarterback told the media. “There's none at all. If anything, I think we've continued to build, continued to grow. I truly believe that. I think that the guys that we have in the locker room, the guys that believe that we can still go 1 and 0 and still be a championship team; those are the guys that we have sitting in this room every day. Every morning when we wake up, we're looking for one common goal and that's to win football games.”



Wilson also addressed his relationship with Harvin.



“Percy and I never had differences,” he said. “He's a guy that, you know, we had a lot of similarities, probably, if anything. You know, guys that want to compete at the highest level, want to win every single time you step on the field. Want the ball in our hands, to make the big play and everything. So I'm not sure why the media tries to blow everything out of proportion, it's part of it, I guess. You have to deal with it. But you also ignore it, too. Like I always tell you guys, ignore the noise. You know, Percy's a Virginia guy and I wish nothing but the best for him.”



We'll repeat what we've said all week: However some of Wilson's teammates view him, the reality is that we're only hearing about it now, as the Seahawks struggle. It never came up last season as Seattle was on their way to winning the Super Bowl, which just reinforces the cliché that winning fixes just about everything. And if the Seahawks start playing well, we're guessing players won't care if Wilson turns out to be C. Thomas Howell.


 



Frequent ESPN talking head Rob Parker, however, went out of his way to do so when the subject of Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III came up on Thursday morning. Parker decided that it was the appropriate time to bring up whether Griffin was black enough or not. No, really. We'll just let the video and transcript roll.



"I've talked to some people in Washington, D.C. Some people in [Griffin's] press conferences. Some people I've known for a long time. My question, which is just a straight, honest question, is ... is he a 'brother,' or is he a cornball 'brother?' He's not really ... he's black, but he's not really down with the cause. He's not one of us. He's kind of black, but he's not really like the guy you'd want to hang out with. I just want to find out about him. I don't know, because I keep hearing these things. He has a white fiancé, people talking about that he's a Republican ... there's no information at all. I'm just trying to dig deeper into why he has an issue. Tiger Woods was like, 'I have black skin, but don't call me black.' People wondered about Tiger Woods early on -- about him."


Bayless, never content to let someone else have the last infantile, stupid remark, upped the ante with this question: "What do RG3's braids say to you?"



"To me, that's very urban," Parker continued, seemingly determined to dig his own professional grave. "It makes you feel like ... I think he would have a clean cut if he were more straight-laced or not ... wearing braids is ... you're a brother. You're a brother. If you've got braids on."



Smith responded, and you can watch the video if you'd like to get that. We generally oppose quoting Stephen A. Smith under any circumstances. What these talking heads throw against the wall to see what sticks is not the point. What is the point is that Parker, in his position as a supposed journalist, has insulted an individual of color to a cruel and unbelievable degree by actually bringing Robert Griffin's "blackness" to the forefront, and openly questioning it with no basis in fact, no knowledge of the person, and no sense of responsibility.



"He needs to define what 'one of us' is. That guy needs to define that," Griffin's father told Jim Corbett of USA Today Sports about Parker's comments. "I wouldn't say it's racism. I would just say some people put things out there about people so they can stir things up.



"Robert is in really good shape on who he is, where he needs to get to in order to seek the goals he has in life ... so I don't take offense."


 

 


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NBA Hall of Famer Charles Barkley spoke candidly about the problems facing the black community when appearing on a Philadelphia radio station, accusing “unintelligent,” “brainwashed” African-Americans of keeping successful ones down.

 

Barkley went on a long monologue on the subject: ”Unfortunately, as I tell my white friends, we as black people, we’re never going to be successful, not because of you white people, but because of other black people. When you’re black, you have to deal with so much crap in your life from other black people. It’s a dirty, dark secret; I’m glad it’s coming out.”

 

 

Barkley said that young black men who do well in school are accused of “acting white” by their peers. “One of the reasons we’re never going to be successful as a whole, because of other black people. And for some reason we are brainwashed to think, if you’re not a thug or an idiot, you’re not black enough. If you go to school, make good grades, speak intelligent, and don’t break the law, you’re not a good black person. And it’s a dirty, dark secret.”

 

 

“There are a lot of black people who are unintelligent, who don’t have success,” he continued. “It’s best to knock a successful black person down because they’re intelligent, they speak well, they do well in school, and they’re successful…”

“We’re the only ethnic group who say, 'Hey, if you go to jail, it gives you street cred.’ It’s just typical BS that goes on when you’re black, man.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEGROPHOBIA AND REASONABLE RACISM: The Hidden Costs of Being Black in America. By Jody David Armour . New York University Press: 204 pp., $24.95

 

CHANNEL SURFING: Race Talk and the Destruction of Today's Youth. By Henry A. Giroux . St. Martin's: 248 pp., $22.95

 

 

 

August 10, 1997|RANDALL KENNEDY | Randall Kennedy is the author of "Race, Crime, and the Law" and a professor at Harvard Law School.

 

 

 

 

Both of these books are largely concerned with the negative image of African Americans in the public mind and the baleful effects of that imagery on private conduct and public policies.

 

Both contend that African Americans continue to suffer a peculiar and unfair stigmatization created by the widespread association of blackness with dangerous criminality.

 

Both maintain, in Jody David Armour's words, that "the most disturbing source of dread in modern America [is] Black violence."

 

"Negrophobia and Reasonable Racism" examines ways in which the specter of "black violence" shapes the administration of criminal justice.

 

"Channel Surfing" investigates reflections of this dread and broader anxieties about other vulnerable groups, particularly youngsters, that emerge in various forums of popular culture, including films, newspapers, magazines and books.

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thank you Mr. Barkley for saying what needed to be said .....MAYBE one decade in the future YOUR voice will mean MORE than conmen like sharpton and Jackson :dismay::dismay:

 

M-A-Y-B-E :confused:

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thank you Mr. Barkley for saying what needed to be said .....MAYBE one decade in the future YOUR voice will mean MORE than conmen like sharpton and Jackson :dismay::dismay:

 

M-A-Y-B-E :confused:

 

 

At this rate it may not ever happen..

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He is dead right. Way to go Chocolate Thunder! Miss him in Philly.

 

The biggest reason thugs and welfare pros to get pissed is because if too many people 'act white' and get jobs and educate themselves is that is one less person dependent on welfare and the gubbmint.

 

They need everyone in line so they can keep the bennys flowing.

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The easy thing to do when one is constantly beaten down is to stop getting up.

After a while, not getting up becomes the norm, and those still down act as if the risers are crazy.

And, in a way, they are.

Remember when 'Cool Hand Luke' wouldn't submit?

Same mentality.

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Charles Barkley is right. As another black spokesperson once said, they're like crabs. You don't have to put a lid on a bucket of crabs because as soon as one tries to crawl out of the bucket, the rest grab him and pull him back in.

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Charles Barkley is right. As another black spokesperson once said, they're like crabs. You don't have to put a lid on a bucket of crabs because as soon as one tries to crawl out of the bucket, the rest grab him and pull him back in.

 

He is correct, they are their own worst enemy. Here is the thing. If Af. Americans were moving up and successful in the same percentages as the rest of the population, most "racism" would end overnight. Much of the "racism" of today is fear of black crime, black thugs, violence, etc. Even liberals wouldn't be so PC and stupid as to go into a "bad" neighborhood at night.

 

Were AA to succeed and take their rightful place in society along with the rest of us, have good families, work hard, strive for excellence, chase the almighty buck, get the best education they could; most problems would be over. And the proof of this is the oriental community. You simply don't see much racism directed toward them though they are as easy to differentiate as Af. Americans.

 

If and when black folks clean up their act, they will find millions of friends waiting for them with open arms.

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He is correct, they are their own worst enemy. Here is the thing. If Af. Americans were moving up and successful in the same percentages as the rest of the population, most "racism" would end overnight. Much of the "racism" of today is fear of black crime, black thugs, violence, etc. Even liberals wouldn't be so PC and stupid as to go into a "bad" neighborhood at night.

 

Were AA to succeed and take their rightful place in society along with the rest of us, have good families, work hard, strive for excellence, chase the almighty buck, get the best education they could; most problems would be over. And the proof of this is the oriental community. You simply don't see much racism directed toward them though they are as easy to differentiate as Af. Americans.

 

If and when black folks clean up their act, they will find millions of friends waiting for them with open arms.

 

 

 

 

 

7/21/13 lichum:

 

A few days ago, a friend emailed Goldman's piece to me. A while ago, I posted (either here or elsewhere) my conclusion that blacks are their own worst enemy.

 

David P. Goldman concurs.

 

 

 

David P. Goldman, July 15, 2013

 

 

What do you do when the oppressed are their own worst oppressors?

 

My earliest memory is looking up at a circle of black and white faces. I was seated in the living room of the family home in Edison Township, N.J., and the group I saw was the local chapter of the NAACP. My association with the civil rights movement goes back to the age of two. The year would have been 1953 or 1954, and my parents were left-wing activists, among the very few white people involved at the time. Their activism was deep. In 1950, my father drove from New York with a group of Columbia University students to protest the impending execution of Willie McGee, a black man convicted and eventually electrocuted for the alleged rape of a white woman in Mississippi. I followed my parents’ example: in my senior year of high school I organized and led a student civil rights demonstration and marched next to Andrew Young. You can look it up.

 

 

 

 

I believe in civil rights as much now as I did then. That’s why it’s painful to watch the degeneration of the NAACP with its silly petition to persuade the Justice Department to bring a civil rights case against George Zimmerman. The leaders of what used to be a civil rights movement want to talk about everything but the main problem afflicting black people in the United States. That is the breakdown of the black family.

 

Just 29% of black women over the age of 15 were married in 2010, according to the Census Bureau’s comprehensive Current Population Survey. That compares to 54% of white women. At all ages, black women were about half as likely to be married as white women. That is an astonishing number.

 

The percentage of out-of-wedlock births has risen from 18% in 1980 to 40% in 2010. 29% of white births were non-marital, against 73% for black births. That’s nearly three-quarters of all black births. Young black men without a high school diploma are more likely to be in jail than to be employed, reports the Pew Institute:

 

Collateral Costs details the concentration of incarceration among men, the young, the uneducated and African Americans. One in 87 working-aged white men is in prison or jail compared with 1 in 36 Hispanic men and 1 in 12 African American men. Today, more African American men aged 20 to 34 without a high school diploma or GED are behind bars (37 percent) than are employed (26 percent).

 

The report also shows more than 2.7 million minor children now have a parent behind bars, or 1 in every 28. For African American children the number is 1 in 9, a rate that has more than quadrupled in the past 25 years.

 

The worst oppressors of young black men are older black men who abandon their children. And the second-worst oppressors of young black men are other young black men. 94% of black murder victims are killed by blacks. The accelerating decline of the black family portends a much worse situation in the future.

 

Why have civil rights organizations and black clergy wagered their reputations on the Zimmerman case? It is hard to avoid the conclusion that the issues that really concern African-Americans simply are too painful to discuss. Five years after the ultimate boost to self-esteem — the election of the first black president — things are getting worse faster.
If black leaders — from Barack Obama and Eric Holder on down — can’t talk about the real problems, the prospects for the future are frightening indeed.

 

Postscript: Conservatives should view African-Americans’ emotional response to the death of Trayvon Martin with empathy. What makes the incident so hard to bear is that so many young black men die every day through involvement in violent crime. Trayvon Martin, whatever his past misbehavior might have been, did not have a record of violent crime, and was carrying no weapon when he confronted George Zimmerman. He was not lost to society as so many black youth sadly are lost. The emotion is understandable in a community that is suffering terrible losses, and finds intolerable the loss of this particular young man.
But that does not excuse the likes of Eric Holder for manipulating these emotions for political advantage, nor does it excuse the NAACP and the rest of the so-called civil rights establishment for its demagoguery.

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He is right yes.

 

All nationalites have there lower class elements who fit the condition Barkley describes.

 

Even us white folks.

 

Note: i am on disabilty so I am a free stuffer on the dole and I don't like being in this position but my health conditions buried me when I still worked paycheck to paycheck. I am on my wifes insurance and I do not get any other assistance though I could.

 

It doesn't feel good but it is what it is. Worked at something since I was six.

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over the last 10 years ive worked with 5 af am women. 2 were married, the other 3 were the soul support for their children. all were hard working. if af am males followed the example of the woman, many of their problems would go away. both them and society would be so much better.


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