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TheflyRussian

Well Sea-run trout season is here again.

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Feather Thrower, neither Bull trout nor Dolly Varden exist in the Northeast. They are limited to the Pacific NW here and in Canada. Bull trout are listed as "threatened."

 

There are a couple of exotics available in the Northeastern US. The one that comes to mind is the Sunapee, limited to pond by that name and a couple of associated waterways. It's one of several fish in the US that are also called "golden trout."

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True, they are listed as threatened throughout most of their range.

There are a few rivers here in Washington where they can be retained. I'd love to see that rule changed.

We encounter them in the salt on occasion while fishing for searun cutthroat.

 

We also have some idiots out here that will catch them and throw them up on the river banks to rot. Their rational is they are eating steelhead and salmon eggs and fry.

Yes they are doing that and have been doing so along side steelhead and salmon for eons.

A true waste of a beautiful native char.

SF

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Feather Thrower, neither Bull trout nor Dolly Varden exist in the Northeast. They are limited to the Pacific NW here and in Canada. Bull trout are listed as "threatened."

 

There are a couple of exotics available in the Northeastern US. The one that comes to mind is the Sunapee, limited to pond by that name and a couple of associated waterways. It's one of several fish in the US that are also called "golden trout."

 

 

The sunapee trout and the "blueback" in Maine are both classified as salvelinus alpinus, but there are very distinct geographicaly populations.

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ANYWAY, to come back to where I was, are we pretty much agreed that in the NE you'd fish for salters, sea trout, and steelhead pretty much the same way and in the same seasons?

 

Come March/April, I do mean to poke around the Nissequogue and Connequot (south of Sunrise Highway) with suitably light-line spinning tackle. Mepps spinners and 3" Rapalas, why not?

 

Best trout I've ever seen was a 7 1/2 lb. steelhead from the Connequot, caught on a killie, when I was a student at Dowling College, 1968.

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Salt run Steelhead in NY? Really? I thought the only salt run Steelhead in the Atlantic were down in Argentina?

 

There was a hatchery on the Connequot at the time (now closed but supposed to re-open) and the fish had doubtless been spawned there, and probably gotten loose either by accident or by a deliberate planting. Rainbows are very quick to seek out the nearest big water.

 

There certainly aren't enough of them to target, but if rainbows are planted in any water that runs to big water, fresh or salt, it can happen.

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Titleguy's USGS reference sheet is interesting.

 

Members of the trout/salmon/char family hybridize easily with their closer relatives. The classifications of the Sunapee and Blueback trout listed are classic ones, based on close observations of fish anatomy. Genetics research is now recasting everything it touches, and I suspect that when the geneticists get hold of these two char (?), we'll see new Latin names.

 

Latin species names change with every food fight in academia anyway. How many times has the striped bass been renamed? Roccus Saxatilis, Roccus lineatus, Morone saxatilis, I don't even remember which one is current at the moment. A recent edition of The Fisherman (was it OTW?) notes the name change of the longfin squid from Loligo pealii to Doryteuthis Pealii - St. Peter alone knows what it'll be next week.

 

Worldwide, I wonder how many species of trout, salmon and char there are, anyway?

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An old thread I see but I wanted to add a little input. I learned much of my fishing by self teaching. As a kid I had no dad or outdoor influence but a desire to fish that lead me to some pretty hardcore outdoor sessions.That meant a lot of exploring and research. Much of that research was swimming with the fishes. I spent many many hours snorkeling many bodies of water on long island. I eventually explored the LI rivers and began a new obsession with trout. I found brookies in a dozen streams back in the 80s when everyone assumed they were mostly gone. I also realized at some point many of these trout would make their way to the salt, especially in the couple of free flowing streams I had explored. 

I believe there are more searun trout than most people realize. I had learned their patterns in such detail that I once took my then girlfriend (now wife) to see them swim upstream in a "fall run" as I would call it. Watching large trout leaping up a small dam is a site even my non fishing girlfriend was impressed to see here on long island. At one time I was in tune enough with their patterns to catch on most trips and sometimes even catch a double digit amount in a single trip. My best size fish being an almost 7# brook, 10.5# brown and 11.5# bow. All caught in the salt or brackish water. I have pics somewhere, I'll see if I can dig them up.

The less obstructed rivers do seem to see more sea runs which made me believe it is not fish just falling over dams and being trapped but that they likely seek larger water as they grow, probably in search of a better food source. 

 

As far as catching them, well fly fishing was never a top choice. While I was never a masterful fly fisherman, targeting them from a greater distance always resulted in better catches so spinning was the way to go. I did for a while use a water bobber to present flies after learning the technique from a man in Colorado, but still had the best success with spinning. I have caught them on the 3 larger rivers as well as many smaller ones, especially ones located in the great south bay tributaries. In spring I would catch them fairly regularly with by catches of fluke and striped bass. Same lures and same locations, likely targeting the same food sources. I have also seen the stomach contents on the ones that made it to my smoker. Mostly small fish, everything from anchovy, silversides and killies to small porgies, bunker, bluefish and bass. I have also found mixers of small pan fish and saltwater baitfish and once an eel. Never found any shellfish or even softshell. 

 

I bring this up because I have recently been thinking about how much I enjoyed hunting down those searun trout and was searching to see if there is still a fishery for them. I guess I will find out. 

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1 hour ago, whewdoggie said:

An old thread I see but I wanted to add a little input. I learned much of my fishing by self teaching. As a kid I had no dad or outdoor influence but a desire to fish that lead me to some pretty hardcore outdoor sessions.That meant a lot of exploring and research. Much of that research was swimming with the fishes. I spent many many hours snorkeling many bodies of water on long island. I eventually explored the LI rivers and began a new obsession with trout. I found brookies in a dozen streams back in the 80s when everyone assumed they were mostly gone. I also realized at some point many of these trout would make their way to the salt, especially in the couple of free flowing streams I had explored. 

I believe there are more searun trout than most people realize. I had learned their patterns in such detail that I once took my then girlfriend (now wife) to see them swim upstream in a "fall run" as I would call it. Watching large trout leaping up a small dam is a site even my non fishing girlfriend was impressed to see here on long island. At one time I was in tune enough with their patterns to catch on most trips and sometimes even catch a double digit amount in a single trip. My best size fish being an almost 7# brook, 10.5# brown and 11.5# bow. All caught in the salt or brackish water. I have pics somewhere, I'll see if I can dig them up.

The less obstructed rivers do seem to see more sea runs which made me believe it is not fish just falling over dams and being trapped but that they likely seek larger water as they grow, probably in search of a better food source. 

 

As far as catching them, well fly fishing was never a top choice. While I was never a masterful fly fisherman, targeting them from a greater distance always resulted in better catches so spinning was the way to go. I did for a while use a water bobber to present flies after learning the technique from a man in Colorado, but still had the best success with spinning. I have caught them on the 3 larger rivers as well as many smaller ones, especially ones located in the great south bay tributaries. In spring I would catch them fairly regularly with by catches of fluke and striped bass. Same lures and same locations, likely targeting the same food sources. I have also seen the stomach contents on the ones that made it to my smoker. Mostly small fish, everything from anchovy, silversides and killies to small porgies, bunker, bluefish and bass. I have also found mixers of small pan fish and saltwater baitfish and once an eel. Never found any shellfish or even softshell. 

 

I bring this up because I have recently been thinking about how much I enjoyed hunting down those searun trout and was searching to see if there is still a fishery for them. I guess I will find out. 

Nice post very interesting. 

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1 hour ago, whewdoggie said:

Thanks Jim. Do you ever fish for them? I want to do some winter trips but I know my favorite old spot is no longer accessible. 

No I am just getting into fly fishing now. I do a lot of surf fishing and always  found sea run trout and salmon fascinating . 

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