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TheflyRussian

Well Sea-run trout season is here again.

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Hi again


First i like to correct myself, sea trout r aggressive in spring off course when they have been standing in the rivers for months without eating. Any place close to the rivers that hold seatrout will be good spots to fish when they migrate fall coming up and early spring going out like others have mentioned in the tread before. Unlike salmon they like to feed close to shore, n even though the bigger ones + 10 pound will seek deeper waters for bigger bait, they still come close to shore to feed at times. The average seatrout will spend most of its life close to shore to feed. Spooky fish though, so early morning n dusk n rough weather is best. It the most beautiful creature in my world. The perfect fly fish.



How long till my replies don't have to be looked after by moderator. ? 



Brian u striper hunters, who fish from the surf would definitely love it. N if some of u hardcore ones one day want to make a trip just tell me n i will help u with all i can. N some free guiding of course. Such a good excuse for my wife, they have come from all the way from the states, of course i will have to help them n then i have gotten myself some free days on the coast without problems from the wife. Smile.


Lars


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Great thread and pretty cool to see all the interest in salty trout.

Our native coastal cutthroat that go to the salt (searun cutthroat) here on the left coast are very slow growing and don't grow very large.

The state record is 6 lbs and was caught in the 40's. Any fish over 20" is a true trophy.

What they lack in size they more then make up for with their aggressiveness and beauty.

SF

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I fished the a coastal

NJ river last year the whole stretch a few times in fall exploring and dreaming of hooking one of these silver beauties. No luck, actually stopped by there after work today to see clarity of water but was muddy as usual and very high, and I forgot to chuck waders in the work truck.

Last year I was working in cape cod and was lucky enough to fish at sunset at a restored salter brookie stream had a nibble on a small clouser but that's about it.

Would love to explore the NY and Conn ones, Conn has some of my favorite trout streams.

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Very cool thread

 

I caught my only one on a Cape stream in early May a few years back fishing for stripers. Took a pink/purple and white clouser maybe 100 yards upstream from the open water. Beautiful, silvery fish - I smiled for a week!

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Wikinglars, 15 posts gets you the use of the private-messaging system, so I imagine that by this time the cyber-machinery will let you post without restraint.

 

I live on Long Island, N.Y., which does have a couple of creeks that will show the odd salter, sea trout or steelhead. The first trout I ever caught was a 16" salter, a male in magnificent spawning colors; as gaudy as a butterfly, and vivid in memory. I was an undergraduate fishing in front of Dowling College at the time, so that's 46 years ago, more or less.

 

As far as flies go, I'd be happy with some of Jonny Kings' Kinky muddlers or simple Deceivers in spearing, sandeel or killifish color schemes. If I get my head around the proper use of 2H rods, that'd be a fine tool for presenting those patterns.

 

Long Island anglers, take note. The late Nick Karas wrote repeatedly about sea trout in the Nissequogue River. The proposed budget for NYS includes money to develop part of the old Kings Park Hospital property as a park. Right now the Park is all but impossible for fly anglers from shore, because the brush runs all the way to the water's edge, and if you step into the water you're into oozy, sticky mud bottom and there's no room for a backcast anywhere. To the minimal extent it's fishable at all, it has to be fished with spinning tackle. The skiff livery that was present at the end of Old Dock Road is long gone, and the Town of Smithtown employees who guard the boat ramp there protect it fiercely from intruders. (This is the voice of experience.) BUT if the budget happens as planned, that could change within the next two years.

 

Spinning .... don't tell my mother, but I do fish with spin tackle from time to time. Do I need anything besides small Mepps spinners to go bother seatrout?

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Thx Brian


Spinning the river is not my expertise, but people in Denmark use rapala wobblers a lot, usually in bright colors like orange. They also fish a lot during the dark n early morning in the summer when the first seatrout come in from the sea to spawn in the streams n rivers.


Rene


 sorry i wrote wrong the first fish from nursery, the second one 45 cm the first one hard to tell cause of the angle. Where have you caught them? 


 



Below 58 cm. on small shrimp fly, its lying on the body look hard to find. In the winter time most sea trout here in Denmark go in the sreams to spawn, but the silver ones with loose skells are a real treat, we call them jumpers, because they jump over a year from spawning n stay in the sea instead go going up a stream to spawn. So they r sometimes bluish silver.


 


1838826


 



1838845


 



Lars


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Your seatrouts are also beautiful Lars.love that pic in the snow.I caught minein the Rotterdam harbour area also called Maasvlakte/Europoort.It's a coastal area with lots of shipping activities.

 

For BrianBM,friends of my with spinning gear fish a lot with spoons like Hansen stripper and Moresilda.Look also for small fluo colored bait.Size 2 to 3 inch.Fishing spots not deeper than 5 ft.

 

Grtz.Rene V.

 

1839171

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I wonder if the pawcatuck river in CT has them. It is a tidal river that I know has a trout population upstream in the fresh portion. The RI state record came from this river for rainbow, 11lbs, which is gigantic for RI. I assume that some trout wander into the salt and maybe get fat off eating bunker and large saltwater forage. I know the river use to hold them, native brookies that went to the salt, they are how our beach, misquamicut (red fish in native american), got its name. People think its from atlantic salmon, but I just read an article about it and apparently the pawcatuck cannot hold salmon, so it had to be sea run brookies. I think our actual sea run strain was wiped out long ago but what are the odds of finding regular trout that have ventured into the salt portion of the river? Maybe I will try to find out this winter.

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hi trwrite


studies from denmark show, that the brown trout n sea run brown trout genetically is the same fish. When a sea run or a brown spawns studies show that both strains have a procentise that a likely to go both ways if the conditions r right, so the browns get juvenils that will seek the ocean if the possibility is there. Blockings also happened before mankind made a lot of them, so they have naturally developed this quality.In Denmark before we removed our blockings in our streams n rivers n stopped the pollution n restored the spawning places with a lot of small stone for hiding their eggs and bigger ones for hiding. we only had stationary brown trout were the water quality allowed it. When the blockings were removed we saw an explosive increase in the sea run n a decrease in river brown trout. research have shown that there is a natural explanation for this. If browns spawn in a river with free access to the sea n the sea holds abundant bait fish they will seek this over time because they can grow so much faster. In Denmark a 50 cm brown is 8-9 years old. when the sea run strain go out to  sea as 20-25 cm juveniles they grow to the same size in under 2 years. So if u have a river with spawning browns n it has free access to the sea with a lot of baitfish there is a very good chance that u will have sea run brown trout as well. Fish close to the river mouth in winter, spring n fall.


LARS


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