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TheflyRussian

Well Sea-run trout season is here again.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by lisurfer49 View Post

 

What flies you guys in CT, NY and the NE in general using for sea runs? Definitely intriguing, I suppose at the very least it'd keep you in casting shape overwinter.





In S. Me. everyone always said "Anything white". After a year of skunks with white I got my first on a nine/three streamer (green/black). Later I got them on white deceivers while fishing for stripers. When I lived in Mass in the 80s grass shrimp patterns seemed popular, a heron fly. I got a few down there tying a muddler with a head made of soft hackle wound tight and trimmed to shape. Don't know why that worked but it did. The ones I ate were feeding on sand eels, later int he year than I expected to see them...


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White is generally a good color as it works allmost anywhere.

In Europe the pink shrimp is a popular choice, it works but also caused by

good marketing from the guy who fishes it a lot.

 

I actually did pretty well with a lot of different patterns, even an adapted dry fly like the red tag.

 

One of the most simple pattern I use is tied on a partrigde shrimp hook and consists only

of some lead wire and polarchenille.

Allthough that fly is simple it really worked, in Denmark but also in Florida where I

actually caught my first sheepshead on that pattern.

 

[img=

http://www.marcelkarssies.com/images/Fyn%202013/DSC_2888.jpg]

 

[img=

http://www.marcelkarssies.com/images/Fyn%202013/DSC_2962.jpg]

 

Now I think that the searun browns are not so thick as in our part of the world but

I guess the same tactics would work near estuaries in the US also.

Where I fish it is a hanging offense to fish those places but I guess in the US it is

different.

Besides the searun browns any rainbow trout that escapes from a hatchery or moves

down river might end up in the ocean also.

 

I always fish for seatrout at the Island of Fyn in Denmark where seatrout is a big thing

also for tourism as the best times are in the off season periods of spring and fall.

They run a pretty neat operation luring in anglers like me - for more info see

their special tourism website below - good tips can be found there.

 

www.seatrout.dk/nc/english.html

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I'm no expert, but I have caught a few CT sea runs the past few seasons. I only hooked one this year and I lost it a little more than a leader length from me. I'd estimate the fish was in the neighborhood of 6# and very strong. The largest I've landed was about the same size. I have seen pics of larger ones, however. Most are caught by spin fishermen. Seek them out and listen to what they have to say.

 

My advice...Be prepared for a lot of skunkings. Don't expect any sort of consistency. Some years are better than others. I had high hopes for this season, but the fish weren't around in numbers (like they have been in previous years). Even in the good years there aren't that many. Think of it as a long term goal over the course of many years. Like I said, some years will be better than others. Some years, you won't hook any at all. Last year was a total wash for me. 2012 was very good, relatively speaking.

 

You have to spend a lot of time on the river to get the run timing figured out. I am just scratching the surface where I fish, but I've sort of learned when to go and when to stay home (though still refining that one).

 

Expect vagaries and obfuscation! I have deleted content from this post 10x over! I just deleted the sentence I wrote after the previous one! I just deleted the sentence after the last one, too! :p

 

My biggest piece of advice...it pays to follow up on any hunches you might have. Also, it pays to be a voracious reader. Don't limit yourself to what you find written about your local area. Sometimes reading about sea run browns from other places will trigger those hunches I'm talking about. (i.e. "Sea Trout" by Hugh Falkus)

 

Good luck!

 

That book was very helpful when I was trying to catch one in NJ. Now that I am in CT I should read it again since there are supposed to be a few places that have them. Hell, at this point I might have a chance catching more sea runs than bass.

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Searun browns are Oct/Nov spawning fish. Post spawn fish often hang out in creeks feeding heavily. Which is the reason most are caught Dec-March. Once spring arrives they normally depart for bay/ocean to feed.

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What did you use to catch it, and how strong was the fight?

 

There are darn few seatrout (using the word in the appropriate sense to mean a sea-run brown, nothing else) in the NE use. Details matter.

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What did you use to catch it, and how strong was the fight?

 

There are darn few seatrout (using the word in the appropriate sense to mean a sea-run brown, nothing else) in the NE use. Details matter.

 

You are forgetting about Salters=sea run brookies, which are limited to fewer creeks but never the less are available.

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spinning gear and i think it was on a small jerkbait like a lucky craft minnow, was fishing for schoolies was about to go on a charter and was fishing from the dock and i saw it follow a couple times and then i finally got it to take it, it was right next to arundel wharf restaraunt if u know kennebunk at all

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That book was very helpful when I was trying to catch one in NJ. Now that I am in CT I should read it again since there are supposed to be a few places that have them. Hell, at this point I might have a chance catching more sea runs than bass.

 

This season, the bass were pretty abundant where I do most of my sea run brown fishing. Mostly schoolies, but some keepers mixed in. It seemed like there were more bass than usual and they seemed to hang around longer. I wonder if that's why we didn't see as many trout? Also, the few trout that were caught were big. I wonder if they were the only ones who felt comfortable enough to play ball?

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Quote:

Originally Posted by hardbait View Post

spinning gear and i think it was on a small jerkbait like a lucky craft minnow, was fishing for schoolies was about to go on a charter and was fishing from the dock and i saw it follow a couple times and then i finally got it to take it, it was right next to arundel wharf restaraunt if u know kennebunk at all



Ah that's the Kennebunk River, not the Mousam. Sooo speaking of sea run browns I happen to be in Galway today, and was just out walking the canals and the Corrib River up towards Loche Corrib. Being a New England fly fisher, I'm losing my mind here! There are sea run browns like the one mentioned holding in the current literally every 20 yards for the 1.5 miles I just walked. Unfreakinbelievable. Then we got to the salmon spot, which appears to be assigned beats. One guy was leaving, so I assumed he found no fish - wrong! Looking over the bridge we saw at least 10 salmon, 10 lbs and up, holding in the pool. I'm guessing they had lockjaw. Alas my camera phone was not up tot the task, but next time I come back I'll be  packing a fly rod for sure!!! 


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I have to admit I do miss the Sea Run Brown Trout fishery we had on cape cod. There is a small semblance of it still but it is not at all close to being to what it used to be.

 

At one time the Mass Fisheries and Wildlife had a very successful searun fishery when they actually used to electro shock the returning fish and fertilize the eggs in the hatchery and then restock in the spring.

 

After stocking the fish in March they would close the season on them until Memorial Day to allow the fish to settle in and migrate out. The fishery was usually best from October and through the winter.

 

This fishery existed for quite awhile but with return of the Striper, the estuaries that had the best searun populations where also favored by the Striper for obvious reasons. So with the stocking of the fingerling searun in March and the return of the Stripers in Appril the outcome was very predictable. The Stripers would just chow down and the searun numbers quickly diminished to the point that the shocking program and eventually the entire program was scraped.

 

My understanding was he return of the searun and the shocking and the raising of the of the young and subsequent restocking did generate a bigger return along with a higher survivorbility of the fish. With the advent of the Striper return they now just use regular Browns that also go in the ponds and steams but still stock in March and the Stripers still get to chow down and now a few do survive but the catching of them now is more accidental rather than a planned outing.

 

My favorite and most successful fly for them was a Flat Wing Rabbiit Fur Hornberg which came from the old Universal Fly Tyers Guide. I made it on a size 8 and 10 model 3906B hook.

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hi everybody


Or u could take a trip to Denmark in marts/april before the stripers hit your home ground( than better stay at home). Sea trout go up to spawn in the rivers in the fall and go back out in jan-feb depending on water temperatures(bait in the sea).They r very aggressive in the fall since they have not eaten any bait for months in the rivers. They r harder later in the season where bait fish is plenty n they start to think about returning to the rivers again. I have caught close to a 100 seatrout these season with ca 50 of them over 16 inches. the biggest unfortunately only 7 pounds. In 2015 i will get one over 5 kilos(12 pounds).


Lars


ps u r welcome to write for info on tactics for surf fishing for seatrout


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