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TheflyRussian

Well Sea-run trout season is here again.

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Is anyone excited for the sea-run trout coming again in Connecticut?  Personally, I dont have a lot of experience with them, but if anyone could give me a few pointers, it would be greatly appreciated.  If you don't want to leave your information out there for the powerbait abusers/skullbashers you can feel free to private message me. I'm a huge advocate for catch/release and overall trout conservation. I've read all of the other posts about it and I'm hungry for more information.  Tight lines everyone.  


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You may find that replies are scarce, for several reasons.

 

One being that people just aren't that willing to share their hard won information with someone they don't know over the internet, especially concerning a fishery such as the one you are looking to get into.

 

Two, it should not be that hard to find likely places and explore them.

 

I'm sure there are more, but that should get things going.

 

O

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Hello FlyRussian,

 

I fish for sea run brown trout in the Netherlands.As a rod I use a #6 9.6 with a fast and a normal intermediate line,leader 6 ft. 10 to 20 lb.

Flies shrimps such as pattegrisen,shimps made from woodduck and small streamers hook size 2,4,6.When sea trout are present,you see splashes at the surface and they jump!

 

Here at my fishing spots I look for sandy bottom whith rocks.You can find them in water depth from 1 ft. to 5 ft.close to the bank/shore.DSCN1243_zps2ff60fae.jpg

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Excited to maybe catch 1 fish in the 20 or so trips i will make this winter?  I don't think so , but i am dumb enough to keep trying.



I did read somewhere that CT will be stocking a real sea run strain of brown trout now instead of FW browns that they have been stocking , so in the coming years there MAY be a decent return. 


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I will also argue that most of the sea run trout we have have simply fallen below dams into brackish water and held there all year. Not sure there is anything special about them.


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In Europe they called sea trout the fish of 1000 cast.For me,after 2745 cast I catch one and 2 minutes later an other.You have to spend lots of time for the first one,and find out lots of things.Not many people share there knowledge and fishing spots.But winter f[img=ishing is amazing!!

 

http://i1220.photobucket.com/albums/dd450/ReneV1/DSCN1229_zps06265d0b.jpg]

 

Grtz.Rene V.

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Beautiful fish, Rene.

 

If a given stream has trout, in the NE US, the odds are that tidal sections will hold a few fish at different times of the year. There is no stream or river here where they are abundant. Sea-run browns move upstream in March for spawning and that's the time I have seen them caught. As other posters have remarked, there are relatively few of these fish, so nobody's going to give up much information on them.

 

On Long Island, the Connequot and Nissequogue give up a few fish each spring. I have never caught one myself.

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I was under the impression that they go up in the fall and then comeback down in January/February.  As they're coming off of spawning they're supposed to be extremely aggressive.  At least according to the books. 


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I know of a couple crowded spots that people catch them (very few of them) in the spring targeting striped bass. I don't fish those spots . But they are aggressive at that time because you hear of people getting them on things like sluggos, SP minnows and i have heard of at least one being caught on a pencil popper!



Read ron merly's book fly fishers guide to ct

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I'm no expert, but I have caught a few CT sea runs the past few seasons. I only hooked one this year and I lost it a little more than a leader length from me. I'd estimate the fish was in the neighborhood of 6# and very strong. The largest I've landed was about the same size. I have seen pics of larger ones, however. Most are caught by spin fishermen. Seek them out and listen to what they have to say.

 

My advice...Be prepared for a lot of skunkings. Don't expect any sort of consistency. Some years are better than others. I had high hopes for this season, but the fish weren't around in numbers (like they have been in previous years). Even in the good years there aren't that many. Think of it as a long term goal over the course of many years. Like I said, some years will be better than others. Some years, you won't hook any at all. Last year was a total wash for me. 2012 was very good, relatively speaking.

 

You have to spend a lot of time on the river to get the run timing figured out. I am just scratching the surface where I fish, but I've sort of learned when to go and when to stay home (though still refining that one).

 

Expect vagaries and obfuscation! I have deleted content from this post 10x over! I just deleted the sentence I wrote after the previous one! I just deleted the sentence after the last one, too! :p

 

My biggest piece of advice...it pays to follow up on any hunches you might have. Also, it pays to be a voracious reader. Don't limit yourself to what you find written about your local area. Sometimes reading about sea run browns from other places will trigger those hunches I'm talking about. (i.e. "Sea Trout" by Hugh Falkus)

 

Good luck!

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