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Fishing Elbow

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Off the wall thread but about 6 weeks ago I was fishing down in Fla. facing a strong on shore wind with my 10 weight. Over doing it for sure but needed to fish. Started to have pain in my casting arm elbow, which as gotten worse, some may call it "tennis elbow". Wondering if any other fly casters have had the same problem. I have laid off casting for awhile but went out last night with my 6 wt. Man it is was sore. It really limits my cast. Been doing some stretching with it, Any thoughts/experiences Really don't want to do the cortizone shots.

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Yep. I've had it twice, and I'm still dealing with the second case as we speak. I've had it since late February, and I can now see the light at the end of the tunnel. This second one is taking a much longer time to heal.

 

Both times I chose the PT healing route (albeit the home version). There are plenty of stretches and strengthening exercises you can find on the web. Another critical component for my home PT is ice, several times a day. You can make an effective ice pack by mixing 1 part alcohol with 4 parts water in a big ziploc baggie. Makes a nice slushy mix.

 

Casting my trout rods doesn't hurt so much. Thank goodness for my switch rod. If I couldn't two-hand it, I wouldn't have been able to fish for stripers this spring.

 

Good luck, and pass the ibuprofen.

 

Steve Culton

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Every 3rd to 4th year, usually takes 8 weeks to get to a stage where it's possible to cast again without being in agony. I normally get it on the first day of a planned trip where I go completely overboard and cast through/ignore the first twinges. I remember reading a thread here somewhere that had advice on exercises to strengthen and prevent.

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You might want to try a compression elbow sleeve. It will immobilize the muscles and cut down on the pain. Keep the distance casting down to a minimum and make sure your mechanics are sound. It is usually bad mechanics that cause the problem in the first place by putting undue strain on the muscles.Advil or Ibuprofen helps a lot since they are muscle relaxers.

 

T

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Shut down for a while or you risk long term pain. I lost over a year of tennis and fishing by ignoring my body. Cortizone there is hell. Time, ice, anti inflamatories and stretches. When you can start exercise but listen to your body!

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Everyone is different and the best opinion and advice is from a trained therapist. I've dealt with "tennis elbow" for 30 years and it is caused by many things, varnishing a boat, pruning trees, etc, etc. My PTguy suggested several things that work for me, maybe will help you too.

If the pain is in the elbow, place two fingers at the elbow and rub vigorously back and forth along the joint. Repeat several times, about a minute each rep.

If the pain is in the muscles running below your elbow toward the wrist, use two fingers to roll the muscle and work it for about two minutes. Repeat several times.

Both massaging excercises are easy to do while watching TV, at your desk at work, almost anytime. Do them several times a day.

To help prevent tennis elbow, squeeze a ball or a hand-grip morning and night. It builds strength.

Once you get it it will never totally go away, always there to surprise on anotherday when you over do it casting, gardening, painting, holding your granddaughter.

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Cross friction massage on top of forearm, reverse curls, strengthen rotator cuff, keep shoulder down and elbow closer to your side when casting and use double haul. Compression straps, sleeves and ibuprofen only mask prob and don't cure it. It's caused mostly by poor technique, weak rotator cuff and/or back of forearm muscles. I had it for 15 yrs. and cured it for good about 5 years ago...tried everything.

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All of the above and go out and get yourself the best Two Hand fly rod you can afford and learn how to use it properly.

 

I am close to 70 years of age and can cast my TH'ers for hours on end and not get sore elbows or shoulders. Matter of fact, one of the reasons I started with TH'ers is because of fly-elbow. ;)

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Watch minute 2 to minute 3 of You Tube's Henrik Mortensen's "Master the Scandinavian Cast" and you won't have a problem. It's your casting style that is the prob.

Herb

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Had it early on in my casting journey, got over it and it has never returned.


My solutions:



* Physiotherapy to recover, but I think that was a waste of money (Ice, massage and ibuprofen, all of which I could have done myself without the PT.) Even so, it took about 4 months to heal.



* Limit casting practice session durations to no more than 30 minutes each (even though they are nearly every day).



* During any casting session, build up to long distances gently. Don't try for full distance on the first cast ….



* I learnt to cast left handed as a method of resting my usual casting arm if desired (Also great for unfavourable winds)



* I now use shorter rods wherever possible (8' is a great length for a 10wt rod)


Cheers,



Graeme

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