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striperking212

Anyone target lake trout

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The lakers hang  on the bottom. 100 feet plus in the warmer months, 70 80s foot range this time of year. drop down the biggest shinners, or herring you can get to the bottom then reel up 2 turns.  i use egg sinkers ,swivel , 6 pound test or 8 leader 3 feet long and a #14 treble hook. In that order. hook the shinner or herring behind the dorsal fin. A slow drift is all you need. a fish finder helps not only for locating but for depth.


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Originally Posted by Thebigfish View Post

 

The lakers hang  on the bottom. 100 feet plus in the warmer months, 70 80s foot range this time of year. drop down the biggest shinners, or herring you can get to the bottom then reel up 2 turns.  i use egg sinkers ,swivel , 6 pound test or 8 leader 3 feet long and a #14 treble hook. In that order. hook the shinner or herring behind the dorsal fin. A slow drift is all you need. a fish finder helps not only for locating but for depth.





right on spot with this tip. you can also jig grub. black or white works for me.


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A good spot in between the north and south towers. its about 100 feet in that area. THATS RIGHT YOU FISHING PRO ******** IM SPOT BURNING. The lakers ruined the lake they eat everything, many small rainbows and browns.


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Originally Posted by Thebigfish View Post

 

The lakers hang  on the bottom. 100 feet plus in the warmer months, 70 80s foot range this time of year. drop down the biggest shinners, or herring you can get to the bottom then reel up 2 turns.  i use egg sinkers ,swivel , 6 pound test or 8 leader 3 feet long and a #14 treble hook. In that order. hook the shinner or herring behind the dorsal fin. A slow drift is all you need. a fish finder helps not only for locating but for depth.




 



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Originally Posted by chewy2000913 View Post

 

right on spot with this tip. you can also jig grub. black or white works for me.




thanks big fish i just dont understand ur set up egg sinker swiverl and leader.. u put a tri swivel sinker at bottom leader coming off the one side than ur regular



fishing line?


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They are the worst tasting out of all the trout and when you hook into one they try to stay down on the bottom. Once you get them off the bottom they come up easily ,not that great of fighters. When you  do hook a big one you think your snagged on the bottom. I guess when you bring them up from the deep they get a small case of the benz.


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slip sinker with a swivel below it .   The slip sinker looks like a football with a hole through it. put your line through it. then tie a swivel to your line. so the egg sinker is above the swivel. then tie a 3 to 4 foot leader to the swivel with a small treble hook on the end.


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Originally Posted by Thebigfish View Post

 

round valley is very clear. Trout are line shy. So the thiner the line the more hook ups you will get,and the more break offs too.





got you so braid isnt a good thing to use lol

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I use braid exclusively for lakers. 10-15 lb power pro with a four to six foot section of 10lb fluorocarbon attached with either an Albright knot or barrel swivel. I jig with 3/8-3/4 oz northland jigs in pearl or glow-in-the-dark and paired with a pearl 5-inch zoom super fluke. Other good lures for jigging are Swedish pimples, crippled herrings, and believe it or not--white bass tubes.

 

I grew up on a small inland lake in Michigan that didn't have a strong forage base, but was heavily stocked with rainbows and browns. Lakers had been stocked at one point in years past and had sustained themselves on the stockers, allowing them to grow to some pretty astonishing sizes.

 

During low-light periods, lakers would school up and move into shallower waters (40-60fow) to feed, but during the high-sun periods would drop down the shelf into 100+ fow. Electronics were pretty critical in terms of not only locating the fish, but also determining how they react to your jigging technique (I used a portable lowrance 4x meant for ice fishing). I found a steady yet aggressive snap jig was what brought them in, but playing "keep away" was necessary to trigger bites. This was particularly effective when there were multiple lakers on the sonar unit.

 

If you have a hard time finding fish or don't have electronics and want to drift, the method mentioned above employing an egg sinker and drifting shiners/smelt/herring also works, but I prefer running a three-way swivel with a 4-6 foot leader running off the back end and attached to an octopus hook and a 1-2 section of 2-4 lb test off the dropper and attached to a bell sinker of weight necessary to keep you somewhat vertical on your drift, which depending on the wind and depth you fish, could be anywhere from 3/8 oz to 1 oz.

 

As for eating lakers, when prepared properly they are some of the best eating salmonid out there. Because they have a high lipid content, they are best either smoked or grilled. My favorite method of preparation is to fillet them WITH the skin, drizzle a little olive on the flesh side, and dip them in a mixture of 1 part Cajun seasoning, 1 part Montreal steak seasoning and 2 parts brown sugar. Should be just enough to get a light dusting on the flesh. Grill skin-side down for 4-8 minutes, depending on thickness of the fillet. The brown sugar acts as a nice glaze and the steak seasoning and Cajun add some zing, but still allow the flavor of the fish to shine center stage for some of the best and easiest to prepare fish you could imagine.

 

Hope this helps!

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I use braid exclusively for lakers. 10-15 lb power pro with a four to six foot section of 10lb fluorocarbon attached with either an Albright knot or barrel swivel. I jig with 3/8-3/4 oz northland jigs in pearl or glow-in-the-dark and paired with a pearl 5-inch zoom super fluke. Other good lures for jigging are Swedish pimples, crippled herrings, and believe it or not--white bass tubes.

 

I grew up on a small inland lake in Michigan that didn't have a strong forage base, but was heavily stocked with rainbows and browns. Lakers had been stocked at one point in years past and had sustained themselves on the stockers, allowing them to grow to some pretty astonishing sizes.

 

During low-light periods, lakers would school up and move into shallower waters (40-60fow) to feed, but during the high-sun periods would drop down the shelf into 100+ fow. Electronics were pretty critical in terms of not only locating the fish, but also determining how they react to your jigging technique (I used a portable lowrance 4x meant for ice fishing). I found a steady yet aggressive snap jig was what brought them in, but playing "keep away" was necessary to trigger bites. This was particularly effective when there were multiple lakers on the sonar unit.

 

If you have a hard time finding fish or don't have electronics and want to drift, the method mentioned above employing an egg sinker and drifting shiners/smelt/herring also works, but I prefer running a three-way swivel with a 4-6 foot leader running off the back end and attached to an octopus hook and a 1-2 section of 2-4 lb test off the dropper and attached to a bell sinker of weight necessary to keep you somewhat vertical on your drift, which depending on the wind and depth you fish, could be anywhere from 3/8 oz to 1 oz.

 

As for eating lakers, when prepared properly they are some of the best eating salmonid out there. Because they have a high lipid content, they are best either smoked or grilled. My favorite method of preparation is to fillet them WITH the skin, drizzle a little olive on the flesh side, and dip them in a mixture of 1 part Cajun seasoning, 1 part Montreal steak seasoning and 2 parts brown sugar. Should be just enough to get a light dusting on the flesh. Grill skin-side down for 4-8 minutes, depending on thickness of the fillet. The brown sugar acts as a nice glaze and the steak seasoning and Cajun add some zing, but still allow the flavor of the fish to shine center stage for some of the best and easiest to prepare fish you could imagine.

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Wow thanks for all this info.. This is all awesome stuff to know when u never fished for them before..I'll let u all know how I do when I go out very soon

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