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Mantis shrimp

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HABITAT: Mantis shrimp are usually found in shallow tropical or subtropical waters, with some species occasionally found in sub-Antarctic waters. They are found along shores, usually living in an abandoned burrow to move in and out to capture prey when spotted. They can also live in coral reefs or rock crevices.

 

I don't think you will find many around here.

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HABITAT: Mantis shrimp are usually found in shallow tropical or subtropical waters, with some species occasionally found in sub-Antarctic waters. They are found along shores, usually living in an abandoned burrow to move in and out to capture prey when spotted. They can also live in coral reefs or rock crevices.

 

I don't think you will find many around here.

 

Sorry Bob not true. We have a species of Mantis Shrimp in Long Island Sound.. Often times in the spring we would catch them in the lobster traps. As a kid we were always warned about their extremely sharp appendages. In recent years there has been a deep water bite of larger bass that has been triggered by either the mating time or some other biological function. You would be surprised where these fish were and how full their bellies were of Mantis Shrimp. Of course that is for everyone else to find out. With the reduction in the lobster population, I can see mantis shrimp filling that void.

Pete

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Spring time is shrimp time!!! We have huge numbers of mantis shrimp in the Peconics and the bass devour them......Look for lighted docks, jetties, boat slips etc at night. All those black/orange "sea robin" plugs are more likely mantis shrimp imitations. :th:

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Berkley Gulp Alive now has a version of the mantis shrimp available, either 3" or 4" I believe. I would start there. A dark colored bucktail with one of the large mouth bass crawfish trailers I imagine would work as well.


On a slightly different note I have heard of the bass eating the Mantis shrimp, but what is the range of the Mantis shrimp. Where would one be likely to find Mantis shrimp, I know it wouldn't be open beach but are tidal ponds be a likely source? What kinds of habitat have striped bass containing Mantis shrimp?


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I find them on the back bay mussle bed. Bass eat them like popcorn, fluke like them too. Rubber stuff works. They used to clogup the screen wells at the Northport power plants cooling water intakes. The smaller ones would make it through the screens and into the system. They would get caught in smaller internal screens and pipes and valves would have to be opened for cleaning. Talk about stink, BIG STINK.

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The shrimp referred to as "grass shrimp" are not related to Mantis are they? I come across the mantis shrimp in the fish that i catch in mid spring, but I never see them running around--only in the belly.

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I just did a little research on the Mantis. They are not related to grass shrimp,not even remotely.

In fact they are not actually classified as a shrimp ,but are " a crustacean- like" shrimp.

They have emerald eyes situated on green stalks. Supposedly they are nicknamed "thumb splitters" because their sharp claws can really cut you.

They have one of the fastest reaction times of any animal for striking prey---they can strike eight times faster than the blink of an eye!

 

Learn something new every day.

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