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JPChase

New to rod building: Workstation ideas

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Hello all, I am just getting into rod building and have yet to build my first rod.  I am seeking some ideas for setting up a work station.  Mainly a desk/table to put a used pac bay wrapper that was recently acquired.


 



I will be building for myself and perhaps family and friends down the road once I hone my skills a bit.  I will likely only be building surf rods from 7' to 13'.  Many of the rods I plan to build will be 1pc or have a longer tip section of 9ft or so, I am not certain if that matters, but figured I'd provide the info anyhow.


I have checked out some of the stations on the other rodbuilding site and they are quite impressive, but likely more than I will ever need.  Any input from you experienced folks would be appreciated and if you happen to have a pic of your workstation that would be great, too.


Thanks,



John


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I lucked out years ago when my company downsized and I was able to get 8 foot long by 30 inch deep laminated maple (butcher block) workbenches. Took the belt sander to them and tossed a couple of coats of urethane on top. They have taken 17 years of abuse. I'll try to get pics later.

My dream setup would be a wall of those in stock kitchen base cabinets that Lowes or HD carries topped with their in stock laminate countertops. If you did 12 feet of that you would have storage out the a** and a baby butt smooth work surface.

I use the same Pac Bay wrapper and never got around to buying the extra four foot section even though I wrap mostly surf rods of one piece. I just have a bunch of accurate holes in the bench to locate the second section further out. I've wrapped up to 11 1/2 foot s glass Lamis back in the day. Kinda ghetto, but it works. Good luck

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i went to home depote bought heavy duty shelf brackets and a 4x8 piece of 3/4 ply wood. find the studs in your wall mount te brackets to the wall. i ripped down the ply wood in half and now i have a 16 foot long by 2 feet wide work bench. a little paint. and wala

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G

i also ran some 220 outlets in my shop by my bench and hung to light fixtures 4 feet long double bulbs and hung them over my wrapper.

Good point. Forgot about lighting. Although if you're impatient like me, poor lighting makes your wraps look better! Maybe increase lighting as your skill level goes up. ;)

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my last setup had terrible lighting so i went to home depot and bought 2 clamp lights, put cfl's in them then i could move them where i needed them. i'm in the process of looking for a new house now. my wife wants to kill me cause one of the main things i'm looking for is a good area in the basement to do my wrapping.

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Just curious how long would you say it takes a beginner to really learn how to build a good,functional surf casting rod?

And to do it right--NOT OVERKILL- just intelligently and cost effectively to get started--- what kind of financial investment is required to build rods in your garage?

Did you guys, when starting out spend a few hundred bucks?

 

I am just now taking a rod building course. I have absolutely no mechanical ability whatsoever---If you let me repair your Van Staal reel --you can use it as a clock radio or ashtray. But I have always wanted to learn how to build rods--so I will persevere. It really seems like a logical and rewarding next step to take,if you love the sport.:)

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JPChase,


I'm sortof in the same boat.  I've been building in what little space I have on a table.  But, moving to a new house and I get an actual bedroom to use how I want.  Now I'm trying to figure out how best to set it up.


Mike


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Fat fingers hit the wrong thing, anyway I put a cross wrap on,nothing fancy, then wrapped the guides back in the same place, did like 5 rods, each time getting better at it. You can find some helpful videos on You Tube also, the first rod I built cost me around $ 170.00 for the blank and all the components, a rainshadow 10'6" surf rod.

 

Treblemaker what are using for lights? 220 seems a little over kill for lights, is it residential or commercial?

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Just Rebuilt mine in Dec-Jan in my new home 11'6" machine bed goes 12' 4" Found some new cabinets for supports built bases under them to raise it up to where I wanted it 39" to the top. Bench has a full length floor pedal and since I converted to DC power it has a full length reverse switch

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I wanted to be able to put mine away (and transport it), so I turned my flexcoat wrapper into a portable table using aluminum angle iron. First I bolted and epoxied a full length piece of angle to the board, which stiffened the board, then I made 2 legs (upside down T shape) that are bolted to to either end of the full length angle. You can break it down in about 10 minutes and stack and bolt the leg assemblies to the full length angle. Works great if you don't have space for a permanent station, and you can do "dirty work" like lathing cork outdoors. Not the best but you can see the legs partway through this video.  



0.jpg  


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Just curious how long would you say it takes a beginner to really learn how to build a good,functional surf casting rod?

And to do it right--NOT OVERKILL- just intelligently and cost effectively to get started--- what kind of financial investment is required to build rods in your garage?

Did you guys, when starting out spend a few hundred bucks?

 

I am just now taking a rod building course. I have absolutely no mechanical ability whatsoever---If you let me repair your Van Staal reel --you can use it as a clock radio or ashtray. But I have always wanted to learn how to build rods--so I will persevere. It really seems like a logical and rewarding next step to take,if you love the sport.:)

Since you live in the Hamptons, by chance, are you taking your rod building course from Al Goldberg?

 

If you're learning to wrap threads by holding the spool in your hand and using pieces of masking tape on the blank to prevent the unwinding of the tread, then, a rod lathe is not a necessity. Just make some V-blocks out of 1X stock. A fly tying bobbin may be handy.

 

The only motorized tool I would recommend is a drying motor setup of 6 to 18 RPM. The art of applying epoxy to thread can be practiced by repairing old rods. These materials will cost $30 - $100 depending on how much you build yourself.

 

By the way, I’m the one who purchased your VM150 on the BST Forum. It still works great. If you remember, your lovely wife made the exchange. A man that can trust his lady with his tackle dough has a real winner.

 

Jim

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