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Packing decorative wraps

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Did a star pattern in black and gold. Came out great. The packing of the threads in the pattern was tough. Any words of wisdom about packing Al? There were a dozen stars to pack and each had about 25 threads.

 

I was wondering what efdfect the tightness of the thread has on the packing. I did it right on t he blank , no underwrap in the pattern. Anyway , the packing was by far the toughest part so I'm looking for some professional tips to make it easier and more effective. Thanks

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Here are a few tips that I found work for me:

 

Always use an underwrap of A thread and apply one coat of color sealant to the underwrap. It acts as a non-slip base.

 

Wrap with moderate tension. Too much tenson will cause "thread creep".

 

Anchor both ends of the wrap with masking tape to prevent the tension from slipping.

 

Periodically pack down the threads while the wrap is in process. This is more of an alignment exercise at this point. After you have initially packed the threads, give the wraps a thin coat of color sealant. Wick off any excess sealant with a sponge brush and then hit the wraps for about 30 seconds with a hairdryer. This will slightly dry the threads and make them sticky from the sealant.

 

Using a blunt burnishing tool carefully repack the threads again. The stickiness will bind the threads together. Work carefully and slowly. Once you checked all the threads for gaps then hit it with the hair dryer again to lock in the threads.

 

Repeat the above steps each time you pack down the threads. The results will very very apparent.

 

 

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Packing and the layout are the hardest part of a successful decorative wrap. I posted basic instructions on constructing a Star on Moment of Fame, here are teh 2 pictures and descriptions that quickly deal with packing the threads: http://momentoffame.com/snapshot.html?id=7755 http://momentoffame.com/snapshot.html?id=7756e

 

Here is how I pack a pattern (quickly described - ask if I confused you) - I make the first 3-4 passes, then pack. After this, I will pack each pass or every other pass. When I see the pattern is about 2 passes away from closing, i pack on each pass. When you pack while in the middle of the pattern, keep in mind the threads of the last pass made will not stay tight. This is because there is no "support" threads on the outside of them to keep them put - Do Not Worry. WHen the pattern is complete, there are ways to get the last pass nice and tight.

 

As you progress throught he pattern, you will come to a point when you realize there is more space here, less there, and if you do not move threads the pattern will close on one side and not the other. Better to notice this early, and pack the threads so that it will all close at the same time.

 

Packing when you're all done: If there are minute gaps that you cannot close, you can try applying CP, letting it get tacky (about 30 minutes or so) and then try closing the gaps.Also, burnishing certain spots (in the background, away from mettalic threads) will fill gaps.

 

DId this semi-answer your question, please let me know. My next post will deal with tools and stuff.

 

Billy

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I use the Clemens thread tool (which is metal) to do fine packing. In corners, the whole side of teh pattern. I have also had some problems with threads breaking due to a sharp edge. Be careful with any metal tool and thread. YOu can get a Revlon Cuticle remover, and shape the non-metal end to get a point similar to a thread tool (the brown plastic part of teh remover - I was given this tip, but never done it myself)

 

I also grow my thumb nails long and use them to do the majority of my packing. THread tension - very important when doing a wrap. Too much, you will never move it, and any thread that passes over it will not be able to flatten it, thus causing another uncloseable gap. DO not try and move huge amounts of thread at once. If you find tyou need to move like 8 threads to close a gap, it is best to take a thread tool, stick it about 1/3 of teh way, spearate threads, and pack. Then do it again, and again. This will get the pattern much tighter and prevent slipping and posibly breaking a thread.

 

Knowing how to pack the crossover points is also important. If 2 threads interlock, they will generally hold themselves where you put them - like the corner of a background. If you have one thread going over aother thread (where the background goes over the arms of a pattern) - this is where teh most gaps will be. Instead of trying to move the background thread where it goes over the pattern's arms, pack the background crossover points on both sides of the arms, then push the background up against the arms.

MEttalic threads need care when packing. It is not hard to remove the outer metallic covering from the Nylon core. With the metal tool, it is really easy to fade teh metallic color to silver - especially Red metallic. They are also really easy to pop.

 

Any more questions post them. If you are having trouble tying off, i have a method I use that is great - I could post that too.

 

Billy

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Thanks for the info Al and Billy. I think the the non slip underwrap will help a lot. Thread tension was too high on mine I'm sure.

 

It seems like using an underwrap and packing as I go are big changes that should help.

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