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PeterO

How much finish to mix?

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I'm getting ready to apply the finish to my first rod and I have no idea how much finish to mix. The rod has 9 guides, plus tip and an 8 inch butt wrap. The guide wraps are about 2 inches each. I'll be using Clemens crystal coat. Any recommendation as to how much to mix up would be appreciated. Thanks.

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Good luck with the Crystal Coat. It's gonna take quite a few applications (at least 5) to get sufficient coverage, especialy on the butt wrap (where you will definitely need at least 5, and maybe 10 - I'll even go so far as saying it will be really hard to get a nice even glass finish on the butt wrap, unless you are very good or lucky)

 

With CC, I tried to skimp and mixed like 1 teaspoon. Getting an even mix of A & B was of great importance, and I blew it. I'd say use 3CC's, or a tablespoon.

 

Peter, I use CC now, but only as a base coat to soak through the threads and fill the tunnel. Afer it dries, I'll use a higher build epoxy to get the glass finish in less coats. I do have problems with feet cracking which may stem from this, but I'm able to coa tthe guides in 3 coats (including the Crystal Coat primary coat), and a butt wrap with 5 coats - and I do not use CC on butt wraps.

 

 

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Thanks Billy. What do you use for the finish coat? I have put a good soaking coat of color preserver on, would you then suggest one coat of CC, and one of the high build epoxies on top of that?

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Not that I have a lot of rod building experience but I like to mix way more than I need. Flex coat lite. Its cheap and its a lot easier to get the proportion right in bigger batches. If you mix it wrong you have made a real mess of yer wraps.

 

Steve

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As Billy said, Crystal Coat (CC) is a very thin finish requiring multiple coats. On a saltwater rod, only using Crystal Coat, will require from 20-30 coats to get a professional, smooth finish.

 

I would use Billy's recommendation. Use Crystal Coat as a first coat to lock in the threads. Wait a minimum of three days and then apply 2 coats of a high-build finish of your choice.

 

Finishes should be applied in multiple thin coats for the best results. For the number of guides and length of the butt wrap you stated, I would mix 3 ccs of A and B.

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Peter:

 

From a chemists point of view... Make More than you need! The smaller the batch, the more significant slight variations from a 50/50 mix will be. Besides... Unless you are a professional rod builder like AL, it's likely that the bottles of finish will be past their shelf life before you use it all up anyhow.

 

I never mix less than 6 cc's of A and B. I generally pitch at least 1/2 the batch.

 

The way I look at it, at this stage you have all of your labor and parts fully vested. Never pays cut corners on the finish step!

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I agree with the Professa with only one caravet that is don't try to stretch the additional finish, that is once it starts to thicken to much for use dump it and mix a new batch, most finish companies recomend a minimum of 3cc of hardner and resin for best results{Carefully Measured and mixed completley}

John

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While I would like to take my new toy out to play NOW, looks like it will be a little while longer before it gets wet. Thanks guys!

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Peter - you really can't go wrong with Flexcoat. Now I have never used this, but it has been put on millions of rods, and there are plenty of builders who use it to perfection. I mostly use Classic Coat - the lower build, and have been decently satisfied with it. The only proble I have is the guide foot cracking, and that is most probably my error when I shape the guide feet. Another epoxy to consider is LS Supreme. I used it as a initial sealer before, as well as on a couple of Freshwater rods. Easy to use, super long pot life, and you willneed more coats to coat a guide wrap sufficiently.

 

For the butt wrap - I use Classic Coat and nothing else.

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The thin rod finishes can be stored - tightly capped - in a freezer between uses and some will stay usable for several weeks, if they are only at room temperature for a half hour warm up period plus the time it takes to apply them to the rod. Preventing solvent evaporation during the warm up period is essential.

 

[This message has been edited by richard fasanello (edited 05-14-2002).]

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