Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
pksurfish

Lami blanks GSB1201M and 1321M

Rate this topic

5 posts in this topic

These two blanks, the first a 10' and the second 11', are both rated to throw 4-12 oz. (realistically 3-8 I believe) and both have size 11 tips but different size butts. I have a custom rod based on the 10' blank, and it is light, powerful, versatile, and just a plain great rod. Is the 11' blank exactly the same blank but just a foot longer? Can I expect that it will throw the same as the 10' blank - same general action and lure weight - except a bit further? Any other comments welcome.

 

[ 09-05-2003, 12:06 PM: Message edited by: pksurfish ]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They're so much alike that there's a lot of guys out there who think they have a 120 1M, when what they really have is a 132 1M with a foot taken off the butt, due to the builder not having the 10' blank in stock. wink.gif They bury the label under the cork tape and the buyer never notices anything. Even when he flexes the rod side by side with his buddy's real 120 1M.

 

Other 10 and 11 foot Lami blanks with almost identical characteristics are the GSB 120 1L/132 1L, and the Arra 1321/1204. But the same doesn't apply to the Arra 1322/1205, and the 121 3M/136 3M in glass--those are totally different animals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 1201M set up for spinning and personally, I dont throw over 6 with it. It seems to strain a bit at 8. I go to a bigger stick if I need 8+.

 

I also have a 1201M set up conventional, and for whatever reason, the 8 feels fine on that. No strain at all. I dont know if its a difference in the blanks or if its spin/conv. set up.

 

I also have the 1321M in spinning and thats fine with an 8n bait. The xtra foot helps. If you couldnt tell, I really love these blanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bunkerhead:

That's an interesting observation. I wonder if it might be attributable to different butt lengths you probably have between your spinning and conventional rods. Putting a reel closer to or further away from the rod tip may change the way the rod flexes, the strength (thickness) of the rod at the mid-point of the flex (the top of the arc the flex makes), and the strength of the rod (thickness)at the base of the flex. I would think that these would impact on how much weight the rod could comfortably throw. (The same thing would be true with respect to the longer rod versus the shorter rod; if I recall the longer rod has the same tip but a bigger butt; thus the rods would be alike above the reel except that you would move further down the rod - to a thicker rod section - on the longer one to get to the midpoint of the flex). Does your conventional rod have a shorter butt/stronger, thicker mid point to the arc the rod makes as compared with the spinning rod? Any rod scientists out there to comment on this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can think of two more reason why the higher weight may feel more comfortable on the conventional rod. Your thumb carries the load of the cast on a conventional, freezing the spool till the moment of release. The drag on a spinning reel has to do that; your index finger is not controlling the load on the spool, it's controlling the line, and the line will cut if the drag slips during the cast. That's why you used to be able to identify regulars by the tape glue on their index fingers, they took a couple of wraps of electrical tape on the forefinger to protect the skin a bit. And, because you do more with the conventional-reel hand during the cast, most guys cast more smoothly then with spinning. If you don't have an even acceleration and smooth release, you get a backlash. Conventional casters are trained to smoothness by the finicky nature of the reel, and that pays off on the side with the ability to handle a higher load. Spinning reels have no such penalties, and therefore guys tend to get away with poorer casting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.