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savfish

blank for bucktailing/chunk fishing bigger fish??

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I just ordered a kayak and will now need a setup for it. I will be fishing for stripers, red drum and cobia in the 15-50+ lb range on the outer banks of NC. I will be casting jigs/bucktails in the 1-3 oz range and baitfishing with 4-6 oz and a chunk or drifting live 10-12" bluefish/menhaden. I will be using braid on an abu 6500 or step up to a calcutta 700 or similar size reel. Everything I have read says to go w/ something in the 7' range w/ a short butt. Is there 1 blank that can handle both applications? Thanks for your help.

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My shortlist of blanks would include composite blanks from Lami, Seeker, Calstar and Rainshadow. If you are fishing from a kayak then 7 feet is the maximum length I would consider. Probably 6.5 feet would be better.

 

Some blanks to consider are the following:

 

Calstar GF700L

Lami CGBT841ML

Seeker CBW658

Rainshadow SWS70M

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AL picked the ones that came to mind. I have the Calstar 700L(spinner and a conventional) and the CGBT841ML(spinner) that i use on the kayak when I drift eels for big stripers. The Calstar is a touch beefer and has a slightly faster taper. They're pretty similar. With either rod, you'll run out a kayak or courage before you run out of rod.

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sav,

 

Jus read you post a little closer. The rods I mentioned are a bit much for the casting part, but great for the bait stuff. I guess if you had to make a single choice, better to over-gun with the big rods. However, one thing you will notice kayak fishing, is there is a difference in the leverage required from a rod and reel. On a boat or from shore, you need the leverage to bring the fish to you. On a kayak, you get dragged around, tiring the fish with the kayak too, and you meet in the middle instead of bring the fish to you entirely. The only exception to this is a fish that dogs for the bottom in deep water, like a grouper or a tuna. Then you need to horse him up. In the scenarios you've mentioned it will be more of a horizontal battle and the leverage advantage applies. This allows a kayak fisherman to use smaller capacity reels and somewhat lighter rods.

 

As for length, it depends on the size of your kayak also. You need to be able to get the line around the bow. I have a Fish n dive which is 12.5' long and a 7' rod dioes it for me. If you have a much longer yak, you might consider more rod length.

 

I like a slightly shorter than normal butt on my yak rods. The reason for this is twofold. First, you need to cast from a sitting position. And second, you need to be able to comfortably hold the reel with the butt in your belly. And be able to quickly move the rod from one side to the other without the butt hitting you in the stomach. Most of my butts are about 12-14 inches from reel foot to butt. Not a real short butt, but a little shorter than most factory boat rods would have.

 

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