Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Crow

Warped Blank and Ethics

Rate this topic

27 posts in this topic

I have an dilema. After building a couple of hundred rods over the years I am at a loss on how to 'fix' this one. The rod is a Lami 1204M full length. It was built originally by a local "Custom Builder". He did the most exact wraps you'll ever see, but the guides all missed the spline by 90deg. To make matters worse he used BSVLG guides so the line was way off the blank. So I volunteered to do a complete rebuild for my buddy. After I stripped the rod and resplined it properly I put it on my winder and it almost shook it off the table. I now see its warped by at least an 1" maybe closer to 2". The warp also seems to be in the middle of the blank not the tip. This is a no $ deal so its a question of whether this rod will ever be fishable or am I just giving him back a rod that will be as disappointing as it was? Judging by the twitchy spline (one spot maybe 1/4" maybe less) this could have been a blem and the twist was always there. Any ideas about how to cope with the warp would be appreciated. Oh and should I even tell him?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Spine is overrated. Build it on the natural curve of the blank & you'll be fine.

 

Some people build them on the spline and some build em' 90 degrees from the spline. Depending on what action you're looking for, neither way is wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

most rod blanks have 2 splines, usually they sit 90º apart from each other, want u want to look for is the more pronounced spline, now ocassionally u will find a blank with 2 spline exactly 180º apart, and this is referred as a "Perfect Blank"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all your input, I did forget 2 things. He always HATED this rod and thought it was the spline problem and it was built as a conventional. I think the builder was trying to get the line off the blank and use fewer guides. At least thats what I figure. I feel that this is gong to be a lost cause, but since its a no cost (for both of us) I guess I'll wrap it and see if the curve can be compensated for. You know now that I think of it; MAYBE thats what he tried to do!! Man I hate this curved blank stuff. Thanks again

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Crow, I am assuming by now you have your answer, but I recently came across this problem myself. When I located the spine, I took a quick glance down the rod and noticed it bent way left. I threw a few posts up and got various answers, and the bottom line, you need to put the guides on and test it. Do a deflection test and a casting test and decide what works best. I got lucky, and chose the straightest line on the blank to locate my guides. After testing it under load and casting it, I was very happy with it's performance and chose to build it that way. I have always built my rods with relation to the affective spine. It would seem, that the concept may be old school and not always imperative to the blanks performance. I think, in my opinion, the spine becomes much more a concern on blanks used for heavy load such as pelagics or strong bottom fish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I doubt that rod blank would ever make a good conventional no matter what you do (maybe wrapped spiral it would be OK). Turn it into a spinner and the problem disappears. just build it so the curve goes down along the side with the guides. You'll nver notice the bend again.

 

 

Its very importatnt for the builder to closely examine blanks when you get them. If they are warped , pass on them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saltheart hit it on the nose. I assumed it was built as a spinner because of the BSVLG guides. With the spine & curvature off, the guides on top, and the fact that these were taller guides, this rod had no chance. Change it into a spinner or spiral like Saltheart said, if the guy is OK with it. Otherwise I doubt that this rod will ever perform very well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well for better or worse here is what I decided. I talked it over and told my friend of the dilema and probable outcome. While not happy he is resigned that it won't be any worse than it was. He'll continue to use it as his bait stick and hopefully the rod won't fight him when he has a fish on.

He also told me he didn't pay for a 'blem' he paid full rate and I can't see this as a #1 Lamiglass. I've wondered if this type of warp can be caused by mishandling or if its a mismanufacture. Most of the bow turns up in the reel seat to first guide. I've seen tips bent but never like this.

I going to put the guides on the top of the spline, as it seems to follow the hook anyway. I had laid out all the guides and tested with a load, still wants to twist but not as bad. Even the spline it self is like a knife edge, not a sweet spot. Its all going to be a comprimise but at least it will be fishable.

It also points out the difference in building a rod for yourself and for sale. I know the builder and his thread work is some of the tightest you'll ever see but not the nuts and bolts of the layout. I know its buyer beware but if you're gonna charge top dollar you have to do top$ work. Thanks again for all you suggestions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is this a common problem with blanks?

 

Is it something you can notice just by eye?

 

I have no solutions for you, but I just want to make sure I never buy one of these blanks.

 

I'll also be very very careful the next time I see "blems" advertised. I think of blems as having some problem with the finish--say a scratch or something. It never occured to me that it could be something much much worse.

 

Thanks for an eye opening thread!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A blem is any rod that is not a #1 quality blank. It can be anything from scratchs and being the wrong size to almost anything else. I know Lamiglass was supposed to have stopped selling blems for various reasons but one was supposed to be builders selling blems as #1's. Maybe if Todd is passing by he can comment on this aspect. When and how this particular took on its twist is unknown. Except to say that any one who put this rod on a winding machine would FEEL it immediatly, like I did. It could also have had something heavy on it in a hot car for 2 days no way of knowing now. I have used blems for my own personal rods and have decided to stop using them and get first qualitiy by a different (read cheaper) manufacturer. If you have access to dozens of blanks where you can really pick through them then I would consider a less than perfect blank.

BTW I have had to fire my proofreader, I just noticed that I quoted the wrong blank #'s, its a 1201M. Oh and its done and I can't wait to give it back to him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me , blems has always meant cosmetically imperfect. Anything functionally imperfect should be called a second.

 

 

Blem or second , I would expect no warrantee service. The price should reflect this. IMO , a blem is worth about 40- 50% of a number 1. A second is worth 25% at most. I would never waste my time building on a second. I might build a blem for myself or a friend who is well informed its a blem and gets a low price knowing its a blem with no warrantee. I would never waste my time putting thread art on anything but a number 1. Its just a waste.

 

I don't know if there are official industry designations but logically Blem means blemished , not defective.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.