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Billy 40

LS Supreme Users

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Hey, if any of you guys have LS Supreme, and the Hardener has Yellowed (or Browned in my cases) - send it back for a replacement.

Here is what mine looked like:

 

LSEpoxy.jpg

 

The 2 new bottles I recieved - both the Resin and Hardener are the same color: CRYSTAL CLEAR. Gadwall and I have spoke about this, and he's seen the difference it made on a couple of my rods (his too). I hope this kicks him in the behind to return his bottles. TE stuff is REALLY good, and I suggest everyone here at least try a 2oz sampler bottle of it. No heat.

 

[This message has been edited by Billy 40 (edited 04-18-2003).]

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While on the subject of finishes it seems some of the Glass Coat finsih-new may have been mislabled that is you may receive two parts of A or two parts of B while the label says part A and Part B you should run a quick check or test to be sure this was on the 32 oz kits.

John B

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Hey John, have you used Glass Coat yet? I'm thinking about trying it for my butt wraps where quick drying time would be great. I'm going to try it anyway, just wondering if you've tried it yet.

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thats the stuff i have billy:glass coat.

i cant really say anything + or - about it, having never used any other finish, but if you can tell anything about the finish from the work you did on my 1st rod... well that was glasscoat.

 

btw the motor is a lifesaver!!!biggrin.gif amazing!!biggrin.gif power! biggrin.gif

 

------------------

-mikeD

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Billy- the Glass Coat has become my go to finish for custom rods very clear and seems to remain so after UV exposure it seems to have fewer bubble problems then flex coat but does tend to set up rather quickly- using flex coat I can usually mix one batch and do an entire rod with the glass coat for me I prefer to mix a smaller ammount and do the rod in two sections.

As in the case of using any new finish a little experminating on scrap is a good idea.

John

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John & Mike, thanks. I don't have bubble problem, I use Classic right now, but I'm intrigued by the quick set up time and the reported clarity of the finish. Plus my Classic is almost done, and I want to try every finish I can, so I'm gonna give it a shot.

 

Right now I've been putting the first 2 coats on my guide wraps with LS, and the final heavy slather with Classic (SW rods). Butt wraps on heavier blanks is all globbed on Classic, and the lighter rods a couple of coats of Supreme, followed by a lot of Classic.

 

Best thing that happened to me is my friend Dennis' rods & his use of the Propane torch. The days of me with 5 thin coats of epoxy on a butt wrap are long gone, altough I may still use 5 coats of epoxy, they will be much heavier and have no bumps.

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A question for Billy 40.....

 

Could you possibly give us an explanation on how you use the torch for leveling your finish? How far away and in what position (above, below, to the side?) is the torch from the blank and for how long a duration of time. I've tried a couple test wraps with old guides in place and so far I'm doing much more damage then good. I'm using Flex Coat Lite. This is my first attempt at any type of flaming as I have been using LS Supreme since I've started building rods. Thank you in advance for any help.

 

[This message has been edited by lamplighter3 (edited 04-22-2003).]

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I've tried a lot of them. Right now , I'm using LS Supreme but will be going back to Classic Coat when the LS is gone. I like the LS watery consistency but i think its prone to bubbles and you can't use the torch to get them out , especially small ones.

 

Since the question about using the torch to level and remove bubbles was asked of Billy , I'll wait for his response.

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Billy don't confuse set up time with drying time they are not the same when you hear glass coat sets up faster that only means you have less time to work with it, it still takes a week to completley cure

note also there is a difference in terms if you apply a second application of finish within 48 hours it is a second application not a second coat.

the term second coat only applies when it is applied after the finish has completley cured in which case you should scuff the finish area with a scotch brite pad or you get very poor adhesion with the first coat

John

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I really like LS's handling characteristics especially the penetration and lack of fumes. However, after experiencing the darkening effect on a wrap that took me a lot of hours, I doubt I'll use it again. Back to Flex Coat.

 

I'll use the remainder on "gadballs" for my friends Nautils smile.gif

 

gad

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Salt - you could've answerred, no big deal. I also agree 1000% (yes thousand) that you cannot remove small bubbles, although few and far between, with heat. Salt, I think we get these small bubbles because we apply too much at once, or tehre is some small amount of contaminiation (or something?) - all I know is with the other epoxies + heat = No bubbles at all. LS does have its place in my "arsenal" though.

 

How I apply heat - Uh, ummm, please practice on test wraps, or on rods for yourself where it may not matter if you burn the finish.

 

With the rod turning, you're supposed to pass the flame under the wrap, with your hand behind the rod (opposite the flame) to make sure you were not applying too much heat. The key to not burning the epoxy was to keep teh flame moveing back and forth, back and forth, back and forth. You almost want to liquefy the epoxy, to the point where it drips. NOt all people agree with this, but I would get it hot to this point, which made it very easy to remove the excess epoxy so it did not football on me. I used an alcohol torch for a while (up until last month), and was satisfied.

 

Now what I did was: I'd actually hit the wrap with the flame - although this is a BIG NO-NO, and I have burned Gudebrod Metallix doing this - I could get the epoxy heat up much quicker. There were times where I burned the epoxy as well, which wasn't a big deal with Classic Coat because I would just disappear - I'd put some more on there, end of problem.

 

With the Propane torch, I just pass the flame right in front of the wraps, and move it quickly. Very quickly, you don't even need to apply heat al that much, 2-3 back and forths, and that should be enough to liquefy the epoxy, thus releasing all bubbles.

 

I wish Dennis would see this and post how he applies heat, he's the one who showed/told me.

 

I'd also like to hear what problem you are having applying heat.

 

 

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Billy- the old safety measure was to hold your left hand behind the blank to hot for the hand =to hot for the rod-better to hold the flame under the rod you can boil flex coat or any finish if it has set up to long or if you apply to much heat-

supreme- sometimes with the small bubbles a quick pass with an alcohol lamp will pop them - keyword QUICK yea I know Ralph will have my head mentioning heat but it works to much heat and you create a bubble machine

John

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Saltheart...I apologize for the way I opened my previous post. After rereading it I guess I may have implied only one person knew the answer. After using this board for over a year now, I know that is the furthest thing from the truth. I've garnerd a ton of info from all the posts here and plan on it for a long time coming.

Billy...The thing I'm most concerned about is the lenght of time applying the heat and the position of the flame. It appears to me that I have to hold the heat there (I understand about passing it back and forth) for a long time (about 6 to 10 seconds) before I see any flattening or movement of the epoxy starting. Obviously, with todays thin walled blanks and working on the tip end I fear I maybe doing damage to the blank.

 

[This message has been edited by lamplighter3 (edited 04-22-2003).]

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