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John E

Stripping the blank.

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Al,

 

I currently have an 11' spinner that I would like to convert to a conventional stick. Stripping the guides, butt wrap and cork tape from the blank seem pretty straight forward.

 

What's the next step to prepare the blank?

 

Does the finish need to be stripped?

 

Any guidance would be appreciated.

 

John E

 

 

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Once the blank has been stripped the original position of the spinning guides will be clearly visible. Wrapping on conventional guides will usually add additional guides and not be in the same position on the blank as the original.

 

I would recommend that you gently sand down the visible portion of the blank and coat it with two thin coats of black spray on epoxy paint. Then let the finish cure for a week before wrapping on your guides.

 

Al G.

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Tom,

 

John said he only had cork tape on the butt. He did not indicate a reelseat.

 

However, if you are faced with that challenge, which I have had to deal, use a Dremel tool with a cutoff wheel and make four lengthwise cuts on the four axes of the seat. I do this very slowly with shallow cuts to prevent cutting the blank. Once I have made the cuts, I insert a flathead screwdriver and twist it to pop off the sections of the reelseat.

 

If the new seat is going to go in the same position, then sand down the residual bushings to fit the new seat. If you are going to change the position of the seat along the butt of the blank than gently sand off the old glue and arbors until smooth. Again, work slowly to prevent damaging the blank.

 

Re- mark the spine and make sure the new reelseat is aligned with the spine.

 

Al G.

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TomG...that's what I used to think! Let me tell ya, they all come off...everyone of them...it's just a matter of how determined you are to get 'em off! wink.gif

 

I removed the seats from two of my Loomis rods...one I tired of and the other I busted. They put 'em on pretty good mind you! My own personal technique (very possibly incorrect...but no one was watching or grading me wink.gif) is to take my trusty Dremel Drill (10,000 fishing oriented uses, I swear!) and cut the seat lengthwise...and then cut it in another spot lengthwise...repeat as many times as necessary until you can remove the strips of reel seat. Voila! No more seat. Be careful, don't wanna cut to deep. I didn't cut all the way through but relied on a flat bladed screw driver to pop the strips apart.

 

Once that's done, now you have the task of cleaning off the tape and epoxy that was holding the reel seat in place...that's the time consuming part...you don't even wanna know how I did that...I'll let Al tell ya the proper way!

 

TimS

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P.S.

 

To sand off the old glue and arbors use either corse drywall sand screen or Red Devel DragonSkin. Both are open abrasive sheets that cut quickly and do not clog up.

 

See Tim, we do it the same way. When am I going to get the "War Club"?

 

Al G.

 

 

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I was using any spray on epoxy paint I could find in the paint store. However, recently a friend of mine told me to try Petit Marine Hull Paint. The plain stuff, not the bottom paint. I gave the blank two thin coats with a soft brush and it came out great.

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Al, Tom, and Tim,

 

FYI. I striped the reel seat last winter. First step was to remove the foam grips using a razor blade. Then, I unscrewed the one hood of the seat and removed it with tin snips. The other hood was removed in a similiar fashion except in little sections and alot of "rolling" the metal back. The remaining plastic was removed using a utility knife with a new heavy-duty blade cutting small sections off at a time. The tape underneath was also removed with the utility knife (very carefully).

 

Just thought I'd offer my "caveman" approach. I felt more comfortable with the utility knife than the dremel tool.

 

John E.

 

 

 

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Hey John,

 

Whatever work for you is fine. The dremel tool is an intergral part of my arsenal in the shop. The first rime I tried to get a seat off I used a hacksaw. Then someone told me about the dremel tool.

 

Of the last eight rods of the season I am now building, four are done resting with their last coat of finish on. The remaining four will have the guides wrapped on tonight and take their first coat of finish. These four should be done by Wednesday. Hurray!!!!

 

Then it's of to Orient Point of Friday for some serious tog fishing.

 

Al G.

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