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Neil

How much strain?

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4 posts in this topic

I'll try to keep this short AL and others.

Although I've been building rods for many years(not as a business)I'm still"in -the-dark about how much pure lifting strain a rod blank will take before it breaks/is damaged.

For example:lets say I select a 10 ft graphite/composite blank rated for up to 30lb line and am using 30lb PP on my reel.

I was taught that one sets the drag to 1/3 of the line test rating on a straight pull.Personally I rarely use more than 5lbs of drag set and use "ye auld thumb or fingers"for more if I need it but I do wonder just how much real strain the blank could reasonably with stand.

Many years ago I read somewhere that one should test lift 5lbs with inshore rods for most types of fishing with the exception of deep trolling.

When I "stress test" a rod for final guide location I deflect it until the blank is loaded to the point in the blank where the bending moment ends and this has always served me well. Would like to know though just how much a blank should"lift". thanks in advance for all the good info i know I'll get. Neil

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Neil,

 

A rod is not a "dead lifting" tool but a lever. As with any lever, the longer the lever or rod the more advantage to the fish. Also, remember that the fish is moving and has some bouyancy in the water. Rarely, are you put into a dead lifting situation.

 

There is a great illustration in the Loomis catalog about the lifting advantage of a rod. What it shows is that the most lifting power of a rod is achieved when the rod is between 30-45 degrees to the water. The more you lift a rod the less lifting power results.

 

That being said every blank has it's own lifting capacity based on it's line rating, length and taper. A 30-80 lb stand up tuna rod probably has a lifting capacity of 15-20 lb before it bottoms out. A 30 lb boat blank with a moderate taper probably has a lifting capacity of 6-8 lbs.

 

When building a rod that will require alot of lifting power I actually make up canvas bags full of sinkers with varying weights. I also use a Chatillion scale. I then glue on a tip top to the bare blank. I tie a short piece of 80 lb braided line to the tip top and a snap swivwl on the other end.

 

I then either attach the clip to one of the bags of sinkers or to the scale. I then load the rod to see where the blank locks up. If the blank locks up at an angle greater then 45 degrees then it does not have the lifting power needed for that particular application. I will then move to a heavier blank.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Al

 

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I don't think dead lifting is anymore than just a term. You worry about how much straight line pull or weight the blank will withstand. If the blank will bust at 20 pounds it doesn't matter if you dead lift that amount of just put that amount of pressure on the blank as the result will be the same.

 

If you have a line rating of 30lbs then the line should break before the rod does. Unless you go past the 30lb line rating and put something larger on it. The manufacturer is not going to rate any blank for a line that is stronger than the blank. That would be a recipe for diaster.

 

So the amount of weight require to fail the blank is usually just above the highest line rating. And then you do have figure that that's for a new unblemished blank. Put some nicks and dings in it and it'll be somewhat weaker.

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Mickey is right on. A blank is rated for the line weight which is typically used for it's designed application.

 

Using a 30# rated blank as an example, you would typically set the drag at the reel at ten pounds. The rod probably will bottom out at 15 pounds when the rod is loaded between 30-45 degree angle to the water. If you tried to dead lift weight you would probably max out at 5 lbs and the same angle when loading the rod.

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