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gadwall8

Spiral Wrap Q

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Suppose a certain a person with limited skills and intellect was wondering, if you build a spiral wrap surf stick (10-11')where do you put the guides in relation to the spine, what would you tell him/her.

 

gadwall

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Gad,

 

First is that the spiral wrap is for a conventional rod only using ring guides. I have built 8-foot plug casting rods using the spiral wrap with good results. I would think that it would work on a surf rod.

 

Now, to answer your question. Since you are building a conventional rod, the spine is on the zero degree axis, or on the top of the blank. The stripper guide is also placed on the zero degree axis.

 

The next four guides are rotated 45 degrees to the left if your are using a conventional reel with a right hand retrieve. Therefore, the second guide moving toward the tip is at 315 degrees. the 3rd guide is at 270 degrees, the 4th guide is at 225 degrees and the 5th guide is at 180 degree which is opposite to the spine. The remaining guides out to the tip top are placed on the 180 degree axis.

 

The spacing of the first four guides that are rotating around the blank has to be closely checked using a stress distribution test to insure that the line does not touch the blank when the blank is under load. This will be a function of the stiffnes of the blank, the size of the guides and the distance between the guides.

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The spiral wrap is not complicated and it has alot of advantages. The westcoast guys have become very hot on it for stand up tuna fishing because of the added performance and stability of the rod.

 

I or another instructor will be giving a demonstration on the advantages of the spiral wrap.

 

Yes, the knots are not a problem passing through the guides.

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Gad - I will be able to give you a better answer next year - you are correct though - up until now, I've only built boat rods up to this point. I will tell you what I know from the rods I built so far, which have all been composite 7' or less - and I have never used a shock leader.

 

What I want is as straigh line as possible from where the line leaves the spool to the tip - just like a "traditional" conventional set up. This mean setiing up the transition guides properly - the only way to find out where they go is to teste cast, and test cast, ad test cast. I have veered off from traditional guide sizes as well - I will go from a 20 to a 12 to 10(2) to all 8's out to the tip - please keep in mind this is worked for the rods I've built so far - not surf rods.

 

The reason why??? To keep the line running straight as possible. I found with 20-16-12 set-up, the line will have noticeable bends when going from one guide to the next. My goal was straightness, and the soltion I came up with is to change fro a 16 to a 12. Test castng and changing the positions of the guide allowed me to come up with spacing that optimized casting.

 

This is a quickie description of how I do it. I do plan on wrapping a plgging rod for the surf conventional, maybe one of those 1081L's? or 1201M's? I've been hearing so much about.

 

If you have any other questions abot what I posted here, or want to chit chat about these rods, PM or E-Mail elkesilvera@earthlink.net -

 

Billy

 

 

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