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JimB

Lami GSB1201L vs. Sabre 1089 as eel stick

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It's crunch time. I believe I've narrowed down my choices for an eel stick (9-9.5' spinning)to be used mainly on the CC Canal/some jetty/occasional beach. I dropped the Lami C6909 out of the running due to the weight. My Baitrunner 4500 is heavy enough alone (21oz). The Sabre is much less expensive. Any comments on the tip actions? Hope I'm not comparing apples and oranges here, I haven't held either blank yet. Lastly, I know most guys throw eels with conventional gear, but I've had this reel sitting on the shelf (I'm usually plugging with conventional gear)and want to find a good application for it. Thanks again!

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Jim,

 

Tough question. I think the Lami may be a little light for fishing the Canal. I can't comment on the 1089 since I have never built or fished it. Lami is coming out with a new line of surf composite blanks but will not be available until the spring. I may have some prototypes to play with in January.

 

The Canal requires a rod with plenty of butt power to slow down a good fish in that current. Therefore, I would also question using spinning tackle instead of conventional. Others on the Board please feel free to post your comments.

 

Al G.

 

 

 

[This message has been edited by Al Goldberg (edited 12-05-2000).]

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Jim ---I've used a 9' Saber blank married to a Penn 6500 spinning for my eel slugging in the Ditch. Can't give you the blank # 'cause I bought it from a fellow fisher some years back and he could not remember what it was. Like Al said, needs a good amount of bone in it. Like pornography, I know a good eel stick when I feel it and this felt good to me.

Think you will find your hook up ratio will be higher if you stick to spin rather than conv. Can't easily free spool conv. and do a quick hook set as you can with a spinner. Also the eels weight is more adaptable to spin rather than conv. gear. My .02.

 

Sure you know the drill---keep the rod up, s l o w l y walk the eel in, lower the rod when you feel the tap, let it run for 5 sec., close the bail, set the hook (assumes you are not using circle hooks). Joe G

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I have a Sabre 1088 and its a war club. I beached a 70 lb sting ray of some sort with the rod last summer. I fish conventional with the rod and use 50 or 60lb whiplash. The tip on this rod barely bends when casting a 3oz jig. Even when I caught the sting ray only half of the rod had a good bend in it. I usually use this rod to throw the biggest chuggers and poppers I have. I just bought a two 1087 blanks and plan to use them with 1.5-3oz plugs, jigs and eels. The 1088 is too stiff to cast well with the 2oz metal lip swimmers I like to use. I looked at a 1089 the other day and its a beef stick it could handle 6oz ava's or cripple herring with ease. "ITS A BIG ROD"

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The Sabre 1089 is a lot stiffer than the Lami, even though it has a much smaller tip (size 7 to 8 as opposed to size 10-11 on the Lami). Faster action. One reservation I would have for eels is that you may find yourself tearing hooks loose on the cast with the 1089. I would size a #11 tip to the Lami and trim it bit by bit until it fits snugly, then take the balance to make it 9' from the butt. I think this makes a better eel stick than the 1089. The Lami has a more parabolic bend to it.

 

Pac Bay now has the Sabre name, the guy who made the original Sabres now runs Calstar. The taper has changed from several years ago, at least on the 1088 and 1087 blanks. Lighter tip and a faster taper. The 1088 is a better eel rod than the 1089. However, I've tried the new taper design 1088 in the Canal, and it is marginal at best to control a good fish. My older 1088 does a much better job fighting fish.

 

The BTR reels are great for eels. In the CC Canal, except at slack, you'll be drifting them with an open bail and "jigging" the rod occasionally to keep them out of the rocks. From the beach and jetties, you can set that rear baitrunner drag with enough tension to not slip on the slow retrieve you give an eel, but loose enough that it will still give line on the hit. No fumbling with the bail or free spool clutch to feed line, if that's how you prefer to fish an eel.

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