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swirlchaser

Let's talk needles, if you guys don't mind.

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The needle fish is the first plug I turned and the one I've made the most variations of. In the past 3 months I've turned 9 different needles and I don't like any of them. The needles I fish most are the heavier SS needles. I'll never get that much weight in that slim of a profile from a wooden needle so why am I killing myself?

Those of you who turn and fish their own needles, what are you looking for in your finished plug? I hope you guys teach me something because I'd hate to say that this one is better left to a plastic mold.

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I like mine to sink level at about a foot a second.

I've only made then out of maple and cherry.

I have made some smaller one that were only tail weighted when the sand eels are here.

The tail weighted ones I let sink to the bottom and twitch them back( kinda like walking the dog).

 

What weight were you shooting for and how long.

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I like mine to sink level at about a foot a second.

I've only made then out of maple and cherry.

I have made some smaller one that were only tail weighted when the sand eels are here.

The tail weighted ones I let sink to the bottom and twitch them back( kinda like walking the dog).

 

What weight were you shooting for and how long.

 

I've made 7.5" 1.75-2oz. 8" 2oz and 9" 2.5oz. Most of mine have been weighted a little more in the tail than the belly. It helped the cast but possibly hurt the action. I have one on the bench now that's 8" birch and will be weighted in front and behind the belly hook and less in the tail. I should get a level sink, let's see how it casts and catches.

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Recently made these three, used birch dowels, they are 5.5 inches long and come in at 1 oz, these were made for fishing low tide/shallow water with not much wave action conditions. Weights are placed at center and just forward of the belly hooks, I used round belly weights that I tap a few times with a hammer to flatten them out so I don't have to drill into the wood as deep. They come in level and have a slight side to side swing. No approval from the bass yet but lately they haven't approved of anything I throw out there.

 

1000

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Quote:

Originally Posted by TKSurf View Post

Recently made these three, used birch dowels, they are 5.5 inches long and come in at 1 oz, these were made for fishing low tide/shallow water with not much wave action conditions. Weights are placed at center and just forward of the belly hooks, I used round belly weights that I tap a few times with a hammer to flatten them out so I don't have to drill into the wood as deep. They come in level and have a slight side to side swing. No approval from the bass yet but lately they haven't approved of anything I throw out there.

1000



They look good TK.  I try to focus on bigger, heavier needles. I am hopeful that one day the east wind will return and I will actually need them :waiting: 


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Aloha swirlchaser,



A great heavy wood for making lures is "Ipe". It is very dense and heavy. Used a lot in the making of outdoor wooden projects like a small bridge over a stream, decks, outdoor furniture.



Ipe is not the cheapest wood in town but hard to beat for a heavy wooden plug. Just be cautious because some people are allergic to the Ipe wood dust and break out in rashes.


Another great heavy wood for outdoors is Aframosia(sp..?). Just about the same characteristics and uses as Ipe. Teak may be another option but does not paint well due to oils within the wood.


I'm in the industry so have access to these woods. For the average joe, buying them could be costly depending on your source. You local custom cabinet shop may have scraps for you at no charge.


Mahalos,


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Maple is fine. for a heavy needle. Guys that have sources of exotic cut offs can and do well with them. Another is decking material can't think of the name right now.:huh:

Here is a lousy picture of one I played with.

 

1000

 

It was so heavy that I did not have to add weight and it still sunk.

 

On needles there is no right or wrong way. Needles can be altered to swim differently, different sink rates, castability and much more.

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It is also very toxic. I ended up in the emergency from a finger blowing up like a balloon over a sliver. Do a search on the site. There is a whole story about it.

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Its hard to compete with SS ability to sink, and stay down deep. They faster you want it to sink, the less wood. So instead of making the wood body bigger to make it heavier, make the body smaller and use lead to make it heavier. Also expect the lead weights to go deeper than the thru hole. You will need to make a mold with the hole in it already or place the lead, and drill through the weight once its in the body. Make lots of blanks and test them all out. Its not hard to do, just takes some effort to get what you want.

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