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Fuji concept

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Al,

Did you see the article in LI fisherman this week, regarding lami gsb1201l built using fuji concept guides ?Have you tested This system on a surf rod ?

Ive been dying to build a surf rod with that system but Im a little skeptical .

What do you think ?

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Bass,

 

I have not seen the article and have not used the concept guides in saltwater. However, I have used the Concept system and I like it's application in terms of rod performance.

 

I do not like the concept guides for the saltwater fishing I do strictly from a durability standpoint. The frames and rings are much lighter than standard guides.

 

Al

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Thanks Al for answering a question before I had to ask it, namely durability. I know the question of choking at the stripper was talked about before but what do you really think about it? Have you enough experience of rods you've built to make jugdement as yet? The article states that it will cast better and keep a rod on spline more than what were used to doing. Many years ago people told us you could get rid of your wire 75's and go to the 50H Hardloy with better results on the spinners. I myself haven't found that to be the case on my big spinners, you can hear the line slap and see the line choking, but at least I don't have to rebend the guide every trip. I don't use small or short rods much, mostly 11ft but I'm always looking for something to show this old dog new tricks. I like big guides, there made heavier and have more clearance over the blank as I fish a conventional 99% of the time. Just another dumb question by Prospector

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Prospector,

 

Like I said in my previous post, I like the concept system. However, it was designed primarily for the new high tech graphite blanks with very slim blank profiles. They needed a lighter guide to not overweigh the tip and not kill the action.

 

I would think that for "ultralight" saltwater applications, like a light spinner handling small plugs and jigs would be a great application of the concept system. I prefer the Fuji YSG ultra high frame single foot guides for this type of application.

 

For standard saltwater casting, spinner or conventional, I prefer standard Fuji guides simply because of their greater durability. The Crazy One and I are very hard on tackle and push it to it's limit, therefore they need to be "Alberto Proof".

 

Al

 

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Al,

What would you think of the concept idea on a 9 foot graphite lami, but instead of alconite, go with Silicon carbide, which has the same frame style as the alconite, just a different insert. I've been dying to build something with this idea, but I'm just worried about durability. Would Silicon carbide make any difference in durability?

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Correct me if I'm wrong here. THe concept guide system has 2 purposes. 1: Use smaller, lighter low frame guides on the tip section of the blank, while using a higher frame guide as the stripper. 2: Choke the line quickly, thus improving the efficiency (reducing friction) as the line flows through the guides.

You don't need to stcik with the guides Fuji designed for this system in order to reap the benefits. You could mix & match frame styles in order to achieve the reduction in friction of the line flowing through the guides. I think (this is my opinion) that the weight savings of guides on a surf or saltwater graphite rod is overrated. Yes, the lighter the guide the more effecient the rod will perform, but will we actually notice a difference?

So I guess what I'm asking is: If you need a rod to be "Alberto Proof" cwm8.gifcwm8.gif and want to reap the benefits of the concept system, could you do this by mixed guide frames. Ex: let's say you're building a rod that uses the following "traditional" set of guides: BNLGH 20, 16, 12, 10, 10, 8, 8, 8. Could you substitutea BHVLG20M, and 16L, followed by BNLGH 10, 10, 10, 8, 8, 8, 8 - or something like that??

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Good Morning Billy,

 

You are right on the money. That is what I have been doing since the Concept System was first introduced. Now you can go back to sleep. It's too early.

 

Best,

 

Al

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I've used the new concept system on several medium heavy 7'-7'6" freshwater rods and like it. I agree with Al that it may be best suited for inshore fishing and light surf duty. I wouldn't want to build a jetty rod with the new concept system using light frame guides. On the rods I've built, I've found that the new concept has produced better performance gains on spinning rods than on baitcasting or conventional rods. It still works fine with baitcasters, I just haven't noticed as much improvement as I have when I've applied the concept to spinning rods. Only MHO.

 

Mark

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Hi, cannot resist to jump in with the discussion.

 

The usual perception is that single footed guide used in concept guide system is less robust, but I am not sure that is the case. First, the frame used in Fuju concept guide (especially those high frame SiC guide) is lighter but stronger than the frame used in some double footed guides. Single footed guide can also act as shock absorber because of their flexibility, while double footed guide is rigid and sometimes is actually easier to get damaged. Of course, with a heavy boat rod or a heaver surf rod I can see the need for heavy duty double footed guides. But for most other situations, I have not experienced any weakness with light frame single footed guides. I have several 8-10 feet jetty and surf rods with both double footed and single footed guides and so far the durability is about comparable. Has anybody experienced much less durability with single footed concept guides? (assuming they are well wrapped).

 

nano

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I have 2 Lamis - GLB961L & GLB901M both fitted with all single foot high frame guides for gathering to tip top. Absolutely no problems! I wouldn't even consider using double foot guides on a rod 8 ft or less. Don't need it. I know guys with single foot high frame gathering guides on 9 ft Lamis and they also love'em. I had quite a time trying to convince my builder 10 years ago to do this but he finally saw it my way. I'm glad he did. These rods see action over 100 times a year against many fish with many plugs and are very durable. I have never broken off one of these guides yet.

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Guide type has very little to do with the Concept System. Double foot guides can be used just as well as single foot guides. On heavy power surf spinning rods I have commonly used SVSG for the butt stripping guides and then shifted to NSG's for the remainer from the choke guide out to the tip. Works great and quite durable.

 

What is important is the guide height and ring diameter in achieving the required elements of the System. Whether or not it has one or two feet or is listed as a "New Concept Guide" is of little importance. I have been using the New Guide Concept for several years now and am not sure I have ever used a true "concept" guide. Likewise, I have seen rods that used the Fuji "concept" guides, but did not offer a true "New Guide Concept" System.

 

You can put the so called "Concept" guides on any rod, but you won't have the "New Guide Concept" unless you understand how to properly size and postion those guides.

 

 

.................

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Hi Tom,

 

Hope you are finally up and around.

 

Tom is absolutely correct in his description of the Concept System. It is the low height of the ring over the blank, the guide ring size, number of guides and their proper placement that is the foundation of the system.

 

Al

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Tom and Al,

 

I understand the concept guide system. It certainly can be used for both single and double footed guides. Other than longer casting distance, the spirit of the system is to allow the use of lighter (or more) guides in the tip section to give better sensitivity. The guides Fuji calls concept guides are all single footed, such as the YSG series. Except in some special heavy durty situation, the use of single footed guides seems to be prefered and more logical for most of the applications. This year I have started to use double footed guides for the bottom section then switch to single footed guides for the tip section. But many people seems to shy away from single foot guides because of the perception of less durability which I have not been able to confirm from my own experience.

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You are correct. I often use double foot guides on the butt section and single foots on the tip area. Even heavy power surf spinning rods may have fast, light tips and the guides used there are not subject to the stress and strain one might imagine. For this reason the only reason to use double foot guides there would be if the single foots would not be expected to withstand the expected amount of abuse or wear and tear applied by the fisherman or situation. Low frame single foot guides, which are normally used on the tip sections of the New Guide Concept, can withstand a good deal more bumping and banging than their higher-frame cousins. I am a firm believer in using the lightest and least that will still do the required job in the required manner.

 

.........................

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