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t58martin

Starting out..

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I put together a list of rods I'd like to own someday. When I figured out the money involved I started to consider building them. I have a few questions.

 

- Is building on a Lami blank cost effective?

The 1322 blank sells for 238 here on SOL, the finished rod is like 299. After the cost of the guides, supplies, and reel seat, is there much savings?

- Are first efforts 'usually' good enough, or should someone start wrapping a really cheap blank for experience first?

- SU 1209 better conventional or spinning (subjective i know) use will be chunkin and live line. Reel will be a 706Z or a 525 depending..

 

Thanks in advance.

 

btw my hit list for the next year or so:

RS:

1209 first candidate

1265 (already own the 1145)

1266 (x2 one for each son at christmas)

1509

Lami:

1322-1

 

Regards,

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t58martin...first...building your own,you can use BETTER componets than factory,you can set it up to fit YOU.you will make a better rod than you can buy.is it cost effective?if you want BETTER quality.for same/less price.up to you.....second.first effort you should build a rod you will use.it sucks to see guys build first rod on a P.O.S.and never use..USE your first rod with pride.you can practice on a piece of blank.at first...third i dont surf fish cant help...My.02 Good luck enjoy

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T58, I am just starting out as well, I am currently about 3/4 the way through building my first rod. As far as your questions on whether it is cost effective to build, I would say no for just one rod but if you are building many rods I think that might start to equal out. I put down a bunch of $ up front on supplies where I could have bought a nice factory rod, but a lot of the supplies would be good for many rods so it should starts to even out the more you do. Also the custom wrapped rod is built to fit you, which you won't get from a factory rod.

 

As far as how nice the first try comes out, I have made a few mistakes on mine that occurred from just trying to figure things out on the first rod, but none of these were all that big of a deal and probably won't affect the overall finished piece. From the experience I am going through right now, I would say build a rod off your list that you want, but the one you will probably use the least as your first one.

 

By the way, I am also using rainshadow blanks and they seem very nice, and come with a nice price tag too compared to the lamis. Good luck.

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I have only built fly rods so far, but have built about 9 of them. I think that you can get started with a very limited set of tools, as a matter of fact, I have really no tools except a small flat file, a fly tying bobbin for thread, a cut out cardboard beer case notched at either end for holding the rod blank while wrapping, tweezers, scissors, masking tape, sandpaper, round file, and a few mixing cups and a small rotisserie motor for turning the rod while putting epoxy on the guides. If you like wrapping your own rods you can always get the fancier equipment later.

 

The Lami blank that you refer to vs. the finished rod will probably be a wash, but if you look around you can find good deals on blanks and other components. Like the previous poster mentioned - you can often choose better components than are used on factory rods.

 

I think that you can do just as good a job as the factory wrappers do - just be patient, do some background reading on wrapping rods (bulletin boards, inter-libray loan, manufacturers how-to videos and written instructions, etc.). Don't get too fancy on your wraps at first, so that you can keep it simple. When I started I bought factory blemished rods and built them - fished with them too as they were all I could afford at the time. Moved on to other blanks later, but I would recommend that you buy a decent quality blank that you will fish with after building.

 

It isn't hard to do and there is some satisfaction of catching a fish on a rod that you put together - similar to tying flies. Sites like this are a good place to learn what you need to get started and gain enough confidence to start the project. Good luck,

 

Pete

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