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JoeB

Prepetual procrastination!

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OK, so I sit at my desk to study every night and I am having the hardest time concentrating on anything else but fishing and all things related. Not good considering I have a final tomorrow cwm31.gif!!! Why bother learing the respiratory system when I have to put together my shopping list for the coming season?

 

Hey, on the bright side, at least I know where I'll be getting the stuff!

 

OK, I'm done. Wish me luck!

 

OK, I'm done.

 

------------------

Joe

Stranded in Albany

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What times the final...Ah, ya got plenty of time. Go have a few pints, study in the morning, piece of cake. Have you ever gone thru the archives here....? Lots of stuff you need to know.

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I'm with Jeff - go have few brews. Eat a big carb-filled breakfast before the test and you'll be fine. If ya don't know it by now, well......

 

Plus Respiratory is simple:

Mouth

Trachea

Lungs (brochioles, right main stem/left main stem, yadda yadda yadda, and alveoli)

Done.

 

Acidosis/Alkalosis - just keep it in the middle values and yer all set. (7.35-7.45)

PCO2 - 80 to 100

 

Smoking = bad (COPD or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, ie. Asthma Emphesema and chronic brochitis)

Asbestosis = bad (restrictive pulmonary disease)

 

If you get walloped in the chest and get a pneumothorax (collapsed lung) and if it then deteriorates into a tension-pneumothorax or hemothorax, I will gladly perform the thorocentesis fer ya. wink.gif

 

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Ok Joe -sample test question for ya,"Doc" :

 

What is the most effective way to secure an airway in an emergency setting (ER, pre-hospital)?

 

a) Esophageal obturator airway (EOA)

b) Endotracheal tube

c) Oropharyngeal airway with a bag-valve-mask

d) Postive pressure mechanical respirator with nasopharyngeal airway

 

Readyyyyyyyyy, GO!

 

(quick Doctor! that guy ain't breathing too good - pulse ox is dropping) wink.gif

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Yup, along with yer smelly Ling party boat pics wink.gif. I tried to post it here but couldn't get it cropped the right way or something. Its still up at the "other site" I think.

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Good way to blow that foreign body down further. Is that the new ACLS protocol? I always thought the direct visualization and placement of an endotracheal tube would provide the most stable and profficient airway. No problems with accidentally shoving the nasal trumpet through the fracture in their cranium or flexing the neck to block the airway. PP also produces huge volumes of air in the stomach which can have negative effects on the respiratory system. Not to mention rupturing the stomach. Do you place an NG tube at the same time for deflation?

 

I would have gone with ET tube, but I'm not in the field. I guess if intubation isn't a choice, I'd opt for the horn and blow like hell. Scott

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OK, I'm done with the exam. A ggod thing I relaxed last night, as all the studying in the world would not have made a difference smile.gif.

 

PS. Jeff--you got me on that one, buddy. This was all histopathology and pathophysiology. Ya think they would be concentrating on the clinical stuff? Nah! biggrin.gif They're trying to make bookworms of us all.

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O Scott.....i would think all that air in the stomach would cause on hell of a gas bubble. I wouldn't want to be around when that thingy breaks loose !! biggrin.gif

 

 

------------------

Bob Sr. (Big Daddy Breaks-A-lot)

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I hear ya, Joe. That's the problem. Make sure you take advantage of your clinical time. Do everything. Touch everything. Ask everyone more experienced than you every wacky question you ever had. Medicine is about the least exact science there is. Everything changes constantly. And NO ONE BODY does the same thing as the next.

 

Sorry Jameson, sorry. No not D. (we have some lovely parting gifts for you though wink.gif )

 

According to current ACLS protocol, and per my personal experience the endotracheal tube (ET)is by far the best method of securing and airway - like ScottO said. The only tricky part is a trauma patient with suspected cervical spine or basilar skull injury.

 

And, oh yeah, a stomach distended with air due to poor ventilatory support will eventually cause quite a mess.

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