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MikeMc

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:read: Henry Ford invented the Charcoal Briqutte !?

 

I can talk about this all night. Yup the left over saw dust.

 

 

 

BTW, I was asked to make ribs for a friends birthday lunch tomorrow. Got six racks ready for trimming tonight and the Backwoods is ready to light up at 5 am.

"... let it go - lets move forward."

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:read: Henry Ford invented the Charcoal Briqutte !?

 

I can talk about this all night. Yup the left over saw dust.

 

 

 

BTW, I was asked to make ribs for a friends birthday lunch tomorrow. Got six racks ready for trimming tonight and the Backwoods is ready to light up at 5 am.

 

What are your thoughts on "Cowboy" Charcoal?

A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. – William James

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What are your thoughts on "Cowboy" Charcoal?

 

I bet I could draw fishy pete into a round or two, but he made be right about it being scrap wood. I recall seeing some odd pieces of wood in a bad a while ago, but rarely use it.

 

 

I'm a simple guy when it comes to charcoal Royal Oak and Kingsford Blue.

"... let it go - lets move forward."

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wood: can I suggest apple or pecan for the lighter smoke like chicken. I prefer cherry for ribs because it's also a light smoke but adds a nice mahogany color to the ribs, which I like.

 

 

for big cuts like pork butts or brisket, I like to add hickory (50/50 apple/hickory for pork butts, 100% hickory for brisket).

 

 

 

have fun trying different wood chucks. btw you can put them right in top of your coals when the coals are lit, wood chucks will burn for a while and a little smoke goes a long way.

 

I was going to do either apple/hickory or apple/pecan on a pork shoulder Satuday.

You know it must be a penguin bound down if you hear that terrible screaming and there ain't no other birds around. 

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Thanks Mike. I'm reading that book online now.

 

got it for my kindle when I got my first wsm. Drives me crazy that I don't have a hard copy for easy reference. I still use it to this day. Check out his Not Arthur Bryants BBQ sauce. I love that stuff.

"... let it go - lets move forward."

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There used to be (maybe still is) a business in Pawtucket RI that made wood chips for smokers... just a big ole' formerly abandoned textile factory in a crappy part of town chipping and bagging wood... hickory, apple, etc... I only mention it because it was such a seemingly incongruent business for the area

A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. – William James

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There used to be (maybe still is) a business in Pawtucket RI that made wood chips for smokers... just a big ole' formerly abandoned textile factory in a crappy part of town chipping and bagging wood... hickory, apple, etc... I only mention it because it was such a seemingly incongruent business for the area

 

I hate wood chips. Wood chunks, baseball size. I don't get the idea behind soaking wood chips then adding them to a smoker when you can wood chunks right to the charcoal

"... let it go - lets move forward."

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Quote:

Originally Posted by NS Mike D View Post

 
Quote:

Originally Posted by RiverRaider View Post

There used to be (maybe still is) a business in Pawtucket RI that made wood chips for smokers... just a big ole' formerly abandoned textile factory in a crappy part of town chipping and bagging wood... hickory, apple, etc... I only mention it because it was such a seemingly incongruent business for the area


I hate wood chips. Wood chunks, baseball size. I don't get the idea behind soaking wood chips then adding them to a smoker when you can wood chunks right to the charcoal



I use 1/2 base ball sise chunks. I allways soak the wood. I use chips some times. Never use green wood. Apple or pare will mello theflavor and add a nice crust. Hickory and apple is nice. I like fruit wood for fish. Meats can take a rougher smoke like hichory and oak. I have been experimenting with blends. I really dont make a big deal out of it. Marinaid it put smoke to it be sure it comes to the proper temp and enjoy. We all could talk for days about it!


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I guess I haven't been hanging around here enough if I missed this thread for a week! So.... My two cents:

 

I don't use the pan anymore. I have those clay disk bases for putting under flower pots, 14" or 16", and wrap them in a couple layers of foil. Toss the top layer when done so clean up is quick. HOWEVER, I do like the results for ribs when using the water pan. It's just such a pain to clean if you don't have an outdoor place where you can just chuck the water. If you have to take it inside what are you going to do? Dump that grease into your sink trap? Yeah... So you flush it and dump soap in the toilet? Been there done that. Makes no difference to me for shoulders so I use the disks for those.

 

For long smoke pork shoulders I like Kingsford Blue because I can count on it burning overnight. Lump is good but it can burn up a lot quicker. I do use lump for Hot and Fast smokes because I can get the temp up faster and higher using lump.

 

Get yourself an instant read thermometer. Thermapens are great. I guess there are others. The pen is key to letting you probe around in large pieces like pork shoulders to see what an average temp is. Knowing the temp of your meat is key to getting a good product. Also, I'm glad you were able to survive eating chicken cooked in a smoker that never got over 150F. Chicken legs should be cooked to 165F internal temp. I don't think you got there from what you posted.

 

Smoking shoulders -- shoulders can take a lot of smoke so don't be afraid of putting in 4-5 baseball sized chunks. I prefer 3 pecan and a hickory or two. Apple is pretty light smoke for shoulders. DON'T think it's going to taste like apples or impart apple flavor. The varieties of wood impart different strengths of smokey flavor and color. Alder is the lightest smoke wood you'll usually find and it's best for fish, then apple smoke, the pecan smoke, then cherry smoke, then hickory smoke. Cherry smoke does add a nice color but you're not usually going to see that in a long smoke -- only in short smokes for ribs. Don't even think about buying mesquite.

 

Starting the smoker -- If you are using sand put it in the oven at 200F for an hour. Take two 28 oz tomato cans and cut the ends out of top and bottom of one and just the top of the other. Place the one with both ends cut out in the middle of your fire ring. Pour the charcoal around it. Put your wood in the charcoal with a small end just touching the can in the middle. Use the second can to measure a can's worth of charcoal and light that up plus a few extras to account for burn down. Go get your sand if you're using that. Dump the lit coals into the can in the ring and remove the can. Use pliers if you don't have fire gloves. Shake the fire ring to make sure the charcoal is settled and has good contact between pieces. Assemble the smoker and let it run to 200 as Scott said and adjust as he said. Let it run for an hour. Watch the smoke. If it's still white, let the smoker run another half hour. If it's still white, let it run as long as it takes for the smoke to die down. Lots of white smoke is NO GOOD. I don't care what Bobby Flay does on his show. When you put your cold/cool meat on the smoker the temp will drop. Don't adjust the vents. Give it an hour to come back up on it's own before you screw with it. As KOQ said, don't adjust all the time. Make a small change and give it a half hour to settle.

 

Water -- Don't leave or let water get into the bottom of your smoker. Ashes are acidic and it will rust out over time if you leave wet ashes in it. The Weber cover is NOT waterproof. I use Contractor trash bags to cover my WSMs. Further, because your gut is acidic, you should also not drink water. It will make you rust. Just drink beer. Lots of it :th:

"Depend not on fortune, but on conduct."

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Quote:

Originally Posted by NS Mike D View Post

 
Quote:

Originally Posted by RiverRaider View Post

There used to be (maybe still is) a business in Pawtucket RI that made wood chips for smokers... just a big ole' formerly abandoned textile factory in a crappy part of town chipping and bagging wood... hickory, apple, etc... I only mention it because it was such a seemingly incongruent business for the area


I hate wood chips. Wood chunks, baseball size. I don't get the idea behind soaking wood chips then adding them to a smoker when you can wood chunks right to the charcoal



If you soak cured wood it will smoke and not burn and catch fire. It will smolder. The idea is Low and Slow.  Brineing and smoking is a cureing prosess.  Dehydration is part of it. But not so dry that it is petrifyed.

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There used to be (maybe still is) a business in Pawtucket RI that made wood chips for smokers... just a big ole' formerly abandoned textile factory in a crappy part of town chipping and bagging wood... hickory, apple, etc... I only mention it because it was such a seemingly incongruent business for the area

 

I hate wood chips. Wood chunks, baseball size. I don't get the idea behind soaking wood chips then adding them to a smoker when you can wood chunks right to the charcoal

 

I agree...

A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. – William James

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If you soak cured wood it will smoke and not burn and catch fire. It will smolder. The idea is Low and Slow.  Brineing and smoking is a cureing prosess.  Dehydration is part of it. But not so dry that it is petrifyed.

 

If you run your smoker right, the dry wood will smoke properly. Smoking is about embers, not flames. Once your fire is started, you choke off the air supply and end up with the think blue flame.

 

 

Now try this experiment. Add some food coloring to the water and soak your wood chunks. Soak them for 24 hours. Then cut the wood in half. if the water penetrated 1/64" that sounds right.

 

 

OK here is another point. Wood smokes at about 575 degrees. The water is long gone by the time it hits that temperature. The smoke you see with soaked wood is actually steam.

 

Soaking wood for a smoker is a myth.

"... let it go - lets move forward."

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