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TheKintnerBoy

Grip transition

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Hey guys, another one for ya...

 

Normally, when I use cork tape for the handle of a surf stick, I use a small (1" or so) piece of that black, shrinking, rubber sleave to cover up the transition point, from cork handle, back down to the blank.

 

The rod I am building, has 2 layers of cork, and the drop off from the cork handle back to the blanks surface is now 2 layers of cork thick.

 

What do you guys suggest for a smooth transition? Stick with the shrinking rubber sleave? Any other ideas?

 

Thanks!

TKB

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Put the rod on the drying motor and while it's turning, make a ramp out of epoxy. Goop it on the blank up to the front of the tape and smooth it with a matchbook cover by letting the squeegee rest on the end of the tape and the blank . The angle you hold the squeegee determines the length of the ramp.

Let it cure, sand off any bumps and wrap the thread right up the ramp. Perfect every time!

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I never use saran wrap. ??? What do you use that for?

 

I used to do the epoxy when I started building. Just one more step with a wait for it to cure that is not needed IMO. I much prefer the method I mentioned. It also comes out perfect.

 

 

I forgot to mention above that after the blade , I just lightly touch it with a file while spinning on the lathe to get the perfectly turned shape before wrapping with thread.

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I do it the way Saltheart does it although I don't have a lathe but find after using the blade I can smooth it out nicely with a little sandpaper. From my perspective as a total beginner at rod building I found wrapping the transition from the blank to cork tape is the one place where it makes it a lot easier to use D size thread rather than A.

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A few turns of saran over the transition makes it smoother and easier to work the thread. Also closes the crack in the cork so the thread won't try to dig in there. Bill Pew did this on his rods and I learned it about 25 years ago from another old timer.

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