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pastormarty

Thinning flexcoat

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What are the pros and cons of thinning my high-build flexcoat? Can I use denatured alcohol? Will it extent my pot life/working time? I'm turning a rod that's drying right now, and was pushing the envelope on pot life by the time I got to the last wrap.

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IMHO, take your time and plan on mixing two batches if that's what it takes to get the job done right.

 

Finish is cheap compared to the time it takes to fix a rush job.

 

gad

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Marty,

 

I do not recommend thinning high build finishes. Thinning changes the characteristics of the finish resulting in it being to soft after curing.

 

I would follow Gad8's recommendation. In addition, to extend your working time, first place your bottles of unmixed finish in a pot of warm water. This will thin out the finish. After mxing pour the mixed finish onto a piece of aluminum foil and let it spread out. This should give you a little more working time.

 

Al

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Access,

 

If you thin the 1st coat of high build finish then make sure to wick off all the excess so you just seal the threads. Then let it cure for at least two days before applying additional coats of unthinned finish.

 

Al

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I wouldn't thin it. I have heard of people using a drop of acetone but never heard of using alchohol. If you do thin it , you only use drops , never a lot of thinner. I wouldn't thin it. There is a Flexcoat light which is thinner if you don't like the high build.You can put the high build over the light according to the manufacturer.

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I don't know for sure about light over high build but if they bond together as in high over light , I don't see why they wouldn't go the other way.

 

I do use Al's foil method for all finishes except UD 40. UD 40 is thin and has a long pot life just left in the mixing cup.

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I think the answer for me is to use two batches of mix, making the new one half way through the guides. I don't have the equipment that most of you guys do (turn by hand, rotate with the left while applying finish with the right) and I just move slow. It probably takes me about 40 minutes from start to finish and it is the guides done last where the finish gets hardest to work with. A second batch half way through should do the trick.

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When you mix any epoxy compound, finish or glue, it causes an exothermic reaction, i.e. it releases heat. If you leave the mixed finish in the mixing cup the released heat will accelerate the cure. By spreading it out on tin foil it releases the heat and slows down the set up

 

 

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well acording to Roger Seiders and his new video on rodbuilding it is fine to cut flex coat his proportions are 6cc of finish to 1cc of acetone. This is done not to extend pot life but rather to reduce bubble problems,most of the acetone is immediatley released before application and the rest if any very shortly there after, I do believe where the problems arise is we tend to get a little slopy with mixing etc which can cause additional problems, I have no problems with flex coat and would prefer to simply mix two batches but thinning it is possible and done all the time.

John

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as soon as i get my light coat delivered i'm going to try it over the high-build i'll let you know what happens....hopefully those hours that i spent wrapping won't go down the drain...

 

i would invest in some type finishing motor marty...unbelievable difference...and soooooooo much easier

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be forewarned acetone is very hygroscopic and water dissolved in the aceetone prior to cutting it into flex coat (any epoxy resin for that matter) will not play nicely as the epoxy sets. if you plan on employing acetone buy it in small quantities and dont keep it uncapped. analytically pure acetone has a water spec of about 0.5% max by weight , stuff you buy at home depot will probably approach 1%. if you mix larger quantities of epoxy it will probably not be as effected by water contamination as much as smaller batches.

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be forewarned acetone is very hygroscopic and water dissolved in the aceetone prior to cutting it into flex coat (any epoxy resin for that matter) will not play nicely as the epoxy sets. if you plan on employing acetone buy it in small quantities and dont keep it uncapped. analytically pure acetone has a water spec of about 0.5% max by weight , stuff you buy at home depot will probably approach 1%. if you mix larger quantities of epoxy it will probably not be as effected by water contamination as much as smaller batches.

 

BrianZ = Chem-Geek tongue.gif

 

beakerlab.jpg

 

 

[This message has been edited by MNW (edited 01-30-2003).]

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