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feltman

gripology question?

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hey al,

 

here's a question i've always wanted to know the answer to:

 

why do most modern surfcasting rods have cork-tape grips while other types of rods have hypalon and cork-ring grips?

 

 

-feltman

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If you are talking about production surf rods, it's a matter of cost and production efficiency.

 

Alot of the lower end surf rods have hypalon split grips while the higher end rods have cork tape.

 

If you are thinking custom, then it's a matter of cost, durability and esthetics. Hope this answers your question.

 

Al

 

 

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actually al, i was looking for a reason why cork tape was advantageous to surfcasters as opposed to thicker materials?

 

what is it about a narrow grip that works for this application?

 

-feltman

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From a historical perspective, big surf sticks of years past were invariably large diameter fiberglass blanks, and the relatively thin layer of cork tape made for a grip 'bout as thick as most folks wanted. Cork-taped factory rods are a relatively new item, the early, original St. Croix Ben Doer series being the first widely distributed models I can recall hitting the market, with Lami, Star, and a few others following suit shortly thereafter. Southern Tackle produced two husky fiberglass cork-taped conventionals - one dubbed the "Hatteras Heaver" and the other the "Jetty Jockey" - prior to that, but they were more of a regional item, and not in very widespread distribution.

 

Now that production lines have geared to the cork-taping, it frequently gets carried to some almost ridiculous extremes, with the material even being applied to very thin seven foot blanks, making for some non too comfy or practical grips.

 

[This message has been edited by Bill Klein (edited 05-31-2002).]

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