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Springer

Air bubble under guide wrap

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In the last month and 1/2 I have wrapped my first 2 rods. On both rods I have had a long thin air bubble along the foot of guides between the underwrap and overwrap. This does not happen on all guides usually just the stripper guide which because it is larger has a bigger gap between the underwrap and overwrap. What am I doing wrong and how do I avoid this next time?

 

Thanks

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When epoxying, you need to fill the tunnel between the guide foot and the overwrap with finish. Just load up your brush with finish, and "pack" the epoxy into the tunnel, kind of like spackling a nail hole.

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I'd check a couple of things....when you do your next rod, make sure the guide feet lay flat on the under wrap. Some bending might be needed to achieve this. I'd also look at how far up the guide your wraps go. If you wrap too far up the guide, you actually create a big tunnel. I made both of these mistakes on my first rod, and also had some air bubbles. Hope this helps.

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I was frustrated with this same problem for a long time. I tried various solutions: filling that area with epoxy, poking the bubbles out with a pin, blowing on the area, hair dryers, using low-build flexcoat for better penetration into the thread, etc. My eventual solution, which I still use, was to flexcoat the entire guide foot/underwrap area before overwrapping. This fills in the area under, the sharp edge at the end of, and the space along the foot. With these edges smoothed out, the overwrap goes on smoothly and evenly, and without any space under the wrap, there are very few air bubbles.

 

I have no idea whether this is common practice, or a total no-no, but it's worked for me. If there is any reason that this is a bad idea, please, somebody tell me.

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By the way, does this air bubble in any way weaken the guide wrap or is it purely cosmetic?

 

EB, do you have any probelms getting your guides aligned with your method? I have been wrapping then fine tuning the alignment before aplying finish.

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I haven't had any problems with alignment because I attach the guides with a little drop of 5 minute epoxy. A piece of masking tape hold them in place until the epoxy begins to set up, at which time I do a final alignment.

 

As I mentioned before, I kind of came up with these procedures on my own, and they may have serious drawbacks that I'm unawre of. However, they've worked for me. Just take my advice with caution. confused.gif

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The air bubbles are purely cosmetic. However, I find that flex coat regular finish is too thick for me , I like a thinner epoxy and use regular thinned down with acatone. I mix in a few drops with the resin and then mix as usual. I find that this will soak in under the "tunnel" in the guide feet. Yes, I have to do two coats of epoxy but it's worth it. I've also used Classic coat and found it very easy to work with, but you need to do three coats for that full look.

EB, 5 min epoxy to hold the guides in place? Sounds kinda risky to me! What if you mess up then what? I've alwasy used color preserver to set the guides in place. cool.gif

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I pack the tunnel as best as possible with the brush tip. i then apply a little heat to get the epoxy very liquid. then in about a minute a bubble will come out. You just pop that. the real problem is that sometimes , ina bout 20 more minutes , a second bubble may come out. be sure to go back and double check and pop that bubble too. It a good oppurtunity to also wick out some excess epoxy around the guide foot fillet.

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This problem is usually a results from the use of color perserver. The epoxi can't penitrate through to the blank. Try a test guide without the CP and see what happens.

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Wouldn't filing the shoulders off of the feet for the guide also make it less likely to hold air? I believe I did this on my last rod and it helped a lot. Removed some excess volume, got a smooth seating and epoxied up very nicely. S

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