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Sparky

epoxy problems

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Finished my final coat of Flex Coat Hi-Build the other night. I tried putting on a light coat and it didn't want to adhere in a few spots. I've now got a lumpy looking finish on the butt wrap and first guide. redface.gif

I prepped the surface with iso alcohol, mixed thoroughly for at least 4 minutes in a clean flex coat cup. I used a plastic stirrer.

My suspicions are these:

-I re-used a nylon brush that I cleaned thoroughly in soap and water, it was allowed to dry for about a month.

- The 2nd coat of epoxy (that I coated over)was about 3 weeks old.

 

My questions are:

-Any idea what I did wrong?

-Can I sand and recoat these?

-Is there a rule of thumb regarding window of opportunity to re-coat epoxy with more epoxy?

 

As always, thanks for the insight. This forum has some real talent that's always happy to share. HappyWave.gif

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Sparky,

 

Let the rod sit for three or four days to allow the finish to completely cure to a hard finish. Use either 400 grit sandpaper or a fine finishing pad and first dry sand and then wet sand until you get a smooth surface. Work slowly and carefully so as not to cut into the threads.

 

Clean the sanded areas several times with iso alcohol and paper towels. Take a soft toothbrush soaked in alcohol to clean under the guide. Then tack off the areas with masking tape to remove any remaining residue.

 

Apply a thin coat of finish and gently flame to remove any bubbles. Let it dry for several days before using the rod.

 

For any epoxy applied more than five days ago, you will need to do the sandpaper step to give the surface a foothold (tooth) for the new coat to adhere to.

 

Al G.

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Hey Sparky,

I wrap or re-wrap a mountain of rods a year.

Every once in a while, something just won't cooperate and looks like hell when it's done.(the technical term for this is "booger"). Grab a razor, cut it off, and re-do it. frown.gif

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I'm a rookie in this forum but I only seem to be able to get 3 double foot guides done before the Flexcoat Highbuild won't soak into the thread as well as it should. I remix a batch, nuke it in the microwave and brush it on. I would recommend tapeing the edge of the wraps to prevent going to far onto the rod, then removing them and heating the wrap lightly to round them off.

 

I don't think the thread on the lumpy guides got a good soaking. I would say remove them. Do you think this is an issue Al? or is the soaking part really necessary.

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Got to agree with Al anytime you allow the finish to completley cure you should slightly rouhen the surface- 3M scotch pads are my choice for doing this leaving out this step will often lead to the problems you stated.

John N

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I remix a batch, nuke it in the microwave and brush it on

 

I'd quit nukin the epoxy after you mix it. I tried that and found the epoxy set up much quicker.

 

I heat the bottles with a hair dryer so they are just warm to the touch now & then mix them. This thins out the epoxy nicely, but doesn't speed up the curing process.

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I wouldn't use soap and water to clean the brush either. I would just use a solvent and let it dry.

 

I got to agree that nuking the finsh after mixing is suicidal. before mixing , some people nuke it a few seconds but once mixed , the nuking is just gonna make it set up fast.

 

when I first started , I found i was having trouble getting a rod done before the pot life problem happened. now i can do at least one and often two rods if need be before it gets too thick. Only trick is just GO LIKE HELL!! smile.gif

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Never, never, never, prep the surface with a solvent. The alcohol was your problem.

 

Surfaces should be clean and dry. Do not wipe them with anything other than perhaps a gentle tacking with a piece of tape or tack cloth and then only if dust has managed to alight on the surface.

 

Normally, thread does not require any surface prep. If you are applying finish to a previously finished surface, the routine would be be clean, then scour or scuff with Scotchbrite, and finish. Never use a solvent as the last step in any surface prep.

 

..............

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I'm a little confused with all of the different theories. After reading the other post by Tom Kirkman, I've decided to follow his advice and not use any solvent, though a very thorough sanding will be necessary. I'll post my results when it's done.

 

Thanks to all. HappyWave.gif

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