Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
music321

steelhead rod as a surf rod?

Rate this topic

13 posts in this topic


I have only ever fished with a southbend medium/heavy rod of 8 feet in length.  It was more of a pier rod than a surf rod.  It was a miserable experience.



I was wondering about the possibility of using a steelhead rod as a surf rod.  I am a novice at surf fishing, so this might be completely impractical for reasons of which I'm unaware. 



 



It seems that for most fish caught in the surf, rod power is not needed for fighting the actual fish, but rather for throwing heavy baits into the surf.  If this is the case, then why not use a surf rod and throw light, small baits into the surf, instead of 2 oz. combinations of bait and lead?



 



I was reading of one angler that moved from steelhead  country to florida, and used this method with success.  He also said that he was met with disbelief and laughter wherever he went.  So, I'm wondering if the steelhead rod can't be used for a legitimate reason, or if it's simply NOT used because it's an unfamiliar choice. 



 



Thanks.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I frequently fish small lures with a salmon-/steelhead rod and it's ideal - much more sensitive and with a much softer action than a similarly-rated "surf" rod.

 

However, you're talking about fishing with bait, so it's kind of a different story. Bait fishing usually requires that you have enough weight added to hold onto the bottom, so simply dropping the sinker size down to be able to be thrown safely with a much lighter rod might not be practical or possible in some places, like where there's heavy surf, lots of current, etc. If you're fishing calm water where you don't need a heavy sinker, and you can cast your bait far enough with little or no weight, then absolutely, use a lighter rod like one designed for steelhead.

 

Keep in mind though, people don't use heavy rods just so they can throw heavy weights - stronger rods also allow you to fight larger, stronger fish. steelhead or salmon rods typically have very thin walls and very light tips and are sometimes designed for extremely light lines, like 2-6lb., so they are going to be much more prone to breakage if you're using the sort of drag settings needed to effectively fight large saltwater fish. a longer rod will be less likely to break.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of my surf fishing is in Florida and involves throwiing 1/4-3/8 oz plugs. I have used a 9 ft steelhead rod for the last several years and it works great. I have caught everything from small pompano to 20 pound redfish. Get a reel that balances well with the rod, has decent line capacity and a good drag. You obviously are not going to horse a big fish onto the beach with this kind of rig. Just take your time and you will be surprised with the size fish you can land. I had absolutely no problem landing the 20 pound redfish. The only fish that I have lost because I was outgunned was a large shark that grabbed a small jack that I had hooked and headed to Cuba. Last time I saw him he was still steaming in that direction. Loads of fun.

 

As prior post indicates, if you are fishing with bait, it is a different game. While the bait may be small, you typically will want to throw it with a weight big enough to hold bottom in the surf. In most conditions that I fish this is typically at least 2 ounces ... in which case I go with a different rig.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I frequently fish small lures with a salmon-/steelhead rod and it's ideal - much more sensitive and with a much softer action than a similarly-rated "surf" rod.

 

However, you're talking about fishing with bait, so it's kind of a different story. Bait fishing usually requires that you have enough weight added to hold onto the bottom, so simply dropping the sinker size down to be able to be thrown safely with a much lighter rod might not be practical or possible in some places, like where there's heavy surf, lots of current, etc. If you're fishing calm water where you don't need a heavy sinker, and you can cast your bait far enough with little or no weight, then absolutely, use a lighter rod like one designed for steelhead.

 

Keep in mind though, people don't use heavy rods just so they can throw heavy weights - stronger rods also allow you to fight larger, stronger fish. steelhead or salmon rods typically have very thin walls and very light tips and are sometimes designed for extremely light lines, like 2-6lb., so they are going to be much more prone to breakage if you're using the sort of drag settings needed to effectively fight large saltwater fish. a longer rod will be less likely to break.

 

Great post. Lota valuable info

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I've use an 8'6" salmon rod in the salt for years throwing lures < 1 oz. The lightness is a lot easier on your arms and back at the end of the day and they have enough power if you're just going for stripers / blues - just take your time coming through the surf. A really big fish in heavy surf might be a challenge.  I'd recommend a longer rod, over 9' for the sake of distance. Got to say, surf rods are getting pretty light these days, so don't rule them out.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


My wife used a 8'6" salmon rod rated 1/2-11/2 oz for years. She landed Stripers up to 28" without a problem using 1oz kastmasters. She now has a 9' Ron Arra 1083-2 rated 3/8-21/4. This is a much better rod and casts much farther, while still being light with a shorter handle. If you are looking to use light tackle, I recommend the Ron Arra 1083-2.



 



Greg

 


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have used a 8.5 ft 1/2 to 1 1/2 oz salmon and steelhead rod in the spring in LIS without any problems, I have a 360 Slammer with 14# Fireline on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been using salmon and steelhead rods in the surf for specific applications for about 13 years now..

 

When you have to vast "tiny lures" but are targeting bigger fish its a great style of rod to use...

 

I use mostly Fenwick rods... 8.5 feet...

 

Light and medium models...

 

I like to use 10-15-20 pound braid depending on the quarry .... They habe nice long handles so it great to snap out a two handed snap cast using a 1/2 kastmaster or hopkins and jig it in the suds nice and stealthy ;)

 

Also small "killer swimmers" like the 3.5 inch mega bait swimmer are right at home on this rod... small strong spinning reels like the old tica libras work well on these rods..

 

Great sport! And I have had days fishing right along side some "pros" that were skunked because they couldn't downsize their line and lures... I went small and had fish after fish with the salmon rod and ting bucktails and tins... it drove em nuts ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Built two from fish eagle blanks, 3/8-1 and a 1/2 -2oz both 10 ft in length. I use them for fishing the shallow rivers here and they perform well within the lure weight ratings . Coupled them with ABU Sorin reels stx70  spooled with 15lb braid.  It depends on river current whether I use the 1oz max or the 2oz but they  have handled stripe up to 20 lbs. I toss light weights so it's all about matching your rod to the weight  you are throwing. The 3/8 to 1 will sling a 3/8 oz jumping minnow 60yds+ on 15 lb braid .   


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My wife used a 8'6" salmon rod rated 1/2-11/2 oz for years. She landed Stripers up to 28" without a problem using 1oz kastmasters. She now has a 9' Ron Arra 1083-2 rated 3/8-21/4. This is a much better rod and casts much farther, while still being light with a shorter handle. If you are looking to use light tackle, I recommend the Ron Arra 1083-2.

 

Greg

 

 

 

I have the same size/action as you mentioned as your wife's first rod rod...It has landed stripers over 40", large bluefish, and albies here in the NE as well as smallish tarpon, large (20+lb) jacks, larger 'southern' ablies, snook and other species during various trips down south

 

I often thrown small soft plastics (3-4 inch on 1/2 oz leadheads), 20 gram maria jigs, and other light offerings that I have no problem casting....and I can turn around and use whatever the largest sized saltwater bomber long a lures available for some night striper fishing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Penn steelhead rod I originally got for snook fishing in an inlet with heavy current throwing bomber magnum long a's and wind cheaters and flair jigs with 20 lb braid . It is a PI1225S86H , 8'6" , 12 to 25 lb , 1/2 to 2 oz. . I also use it in Tn River dam tail races for striper fishing . Some times I think if the action was a little faster it would cast farther but it is a pretty good rod . I have a Penn 4400SS reel on it .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.