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The ORB

Custom Vs Factory

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OK I'm mulling over ideas for a new rod for next Spring and I have been thinking about getting my first custom rod. The thing that concerns me is, what if it breaks? You buy a blank from Lami, AllStar, Loomis or whoever and have it custom built just how you want it, but then presumably if the blank breaks (which does happen with todays high end graphite rods) then Lami etc will only replace the blank and you presumably have to pay to have the whole thing custom built again! Is this right or am I missing something?

Also why is it that custom rods are assumed to be so much better than premium factory ones (apart from having the details and wraps just how you like them), do they actually fish better? Take my factory XSRA 1083 for example, do Lamiglas not do the best job of building them and would I have got a better product if I had it custom built?

Thanks for any advice guys. smile.gif

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Orb,

 

Having built a few custom rods over the years I know from my own experience that a custom rod built by a qualified rod builder will result in a better functional rod. The artistic part is just an addition.

 

Also, production rods are bult with average specifications for fishermen. For surf rods, in particular, the length of the butt grip, the distance from the reelseat to the stripper guide and the size of the stripper guide are critical for optimum performance. The closer the builder gets these specs to the fisherman's requirements the better the rod will perform.

 

As far as rod breakage and warranty, it depends on the builder.

 

Hope this helps to answer your questions.

 

Al

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I am not a professional builder but knowing what little I know, I think a custom built rod is also less likely to break since a reputable builder is likely to closely examine any blanks his is using, spline them (which is not done with most commercial rods (even the expensive ones!!!) and make sure that the rod is carefully finished (ferule wraps, etc.).

 

Its also a lot nicer to fish with one. smile.gif

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Orb,

 

You are never going find a factory rod that will perform as well as a good custom rod.

A factory can never do things like measure the rod for individual grip lengths, determine which reel and type of line to use and many other things that you can only see from a custom job.

 

Todd

 

[This message has been edited by toddv (edited 11-10-2002).]

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ORB Another point of view, first lets consider that your talking about a production rod from a high end manufacturer, as opposed to a kmart special. With that thought in mind I would say that if you fit into the general size of the avg. fishermen you wont have a problem. And it's a good way to save some money should that be of concern. Just keep in mind a few things. Like your handle length, quality of components, guides that have been under wrapped. Also if buying it from a tackle shop, ask to put a reel with line on it, string it up and compress the blank and check to see that the line does not come in contact with the rod. A common problem with some factory rods. The guys above are correct to about customs, and I too am a big advocate of them. But there are some really good factory rods on the market. Regards Big Dave

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Dave, I'm certainly not out to turn someone away from our rods. But I have built customs for many years and I know the advantages to be gained by being fit for the user and the user's intended reel's.

 

Todd

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I built my first custom over the weekend and I'm re-building two rods now.

 

I guarantee that a good custom rod will outperform any factory made rod.

 

The advantages that these guys are talking about are absolutely huge. You are getting a rod that is custom fitted to you and your reel. No factory rod can match that.

 

Take any factory rod you have and tie a five gallon bucket with some water in it...lift the pail and see what happens.

 

I was cod fishing over the winter. In just one day of jigging I broke the poor dude's reel and two guides on the rod. It was a popular name brand outfit. The guides were not spined correctly and the guides broke under the twist.

 

There are very few factory rods out there that can match the details you can put on a custom. sic guides, large strippers, sic tips, new guide concept, cork grips, and i havent' even gotten to the look of the the custom.

 

as for your breakage issue...yo will be shocked at how easy it is to strip down the guides on a rod and install new ones. Say your blank broke you cold strip it down keep the components and then get a new blank. I'm sure some shops would discount your wrap job, cuz' you've got all the components...or you could just do it yourself.

 

Long response to a short question, but hope it helps

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I just really started getting more "technically" involved in fishing a couple of years ago. I used to go when I was a lil kid, but would just use "hand me down" rods then moved up to Ugly Sticks. Last two years I stepped up to some better rods, Loomis, St. Croix, and Lamiglass. They are like night and day compared to "cheaper" rods. I just recently had my first custom made for me and there is, again, quite a difference. It was made to my own personal preferences and measurements. The rod is a marvel and performs so much better than a factory rod of the same make.

I believe that you get what you pay for and if you can afford it, get a custom...it's an investment that makes your pasttime that much more enjoyableicon14.gificon14.gif

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there is one other very important point to consider. if the rod is built around the blank, the rod builder can put the guides exactly where they belong on that particular blank. I am a firm believer in the equal angle system designed by don morton. there is also the forhan locking wrap for single foot guides. both of these guide placement/ wrapping tecniques are explained in rodmaker magazine Volume 4, issue 6, and I highly recommend it.

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