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Cool Hand Fluke

The most basic of basic questions

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I have picked up/amassed some stuff over the last few months to start wrapping my own rods. I am working on my setup and thought an ice rod would be the easiest to start with.

 

Mistake number one. Everything is too damn small for these brats I call fingers but I endeavor to continue.

 

My first question besides how do you wok with a Tennessee handle when the cork insert is not as long as the graphite "handle" is this......

 

 

Is it just me or does nylon thread just want to unravel when you cut it?

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What thread are you using? I assume Gudebrod size A, or D? What are you using for tension, and what are you using to support the blank?

 

A MAJOR problem when wrapping light tips, is that the tension on teh thread pulls & bends teh blank. If you're not careful, you will straighten the blank out and put slack in teh thread, between the rod & teh spool. This will cause the threads to unravel on teh blank.

 

It's MUCH easier working on a bigger blank, especailly for the first rod.

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I found that out when after doing the handle and such I put a freshwater casting blank on the blocks and just made a random wrap to practice...that came out great except for the "fuzz" where I cut the thread and then pulled it through the wraps. Now I know with two coats of finish I can trim any bumps/fuzz after the first coat but I am curious.

 

Yeah I am using GB "A" on a basic Flex Coat hand wrapper with Flex Coat thread tensioners...I also have an egg sinker on top of the spool as well sinc I was afarid of having the tensioner too tight and having it bind..which I guess it really cant do but hey what do I know.

 

I put up some pics of my "station" so you guys can bust my stones.

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You need to cut the thread properly. after pulling it through , you want to pull it against the last wrap so that wrap or even the last couple of wraps are a little lifted. You then come in opposite the tension direction with a nice new , sharp razor. When you cut the thread , the end will actually pull back under the last wrap or two and be totally hidden.

 

Assuming you do as I described , you still have some that leave a little fuzz. One way to eliminate the fuzz is with a flame. simple burn it and it will disapper.

 

if after all this , you still have some problem spots , coat it with the first layer of finish , very lighty by saturating it then wicking it all off except what has penetrated. then when that cures , come in with a blade and just knock the little tips off. You just want to cut that little point off that forms , not the whole bump. After that , the next coat or even a third coat will hide everything.

 

If you are going to knock down the tips with a razor , remember that this is like just a few on the whole rod and just the tips. If you go nuts with the blade cutting off all bumps , etc , the next coat may fish eye on you.

 

Anyway , if you cut the thread properly , 95% of your problem will go away.

 

As far as the thread unravelling or whatever , i think thats a thread carriage or tensioner issue. I don't use a thread carriage or a tensioner per say despite having the Clemens thread carriage. I much prefer thread bobbins like used for tying flies. Its a little harder to get used to and also hartder to lay down multiple threads but overall I prefer it since i can control the thred tension at all times , despite what the blank may be doing as far as flexing or wobbling.

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Getting clean flush cuts after you've pulled the thread thru the wrap is just a matter of lotsa practice. At worst you should end with a small clean nub which you burnish / work down into the wrap.

 

When your're ready to cut to the thread from the spool in advance of your tie-off, keep tension on the wrap with finger pressure and relieve the tension from the wrap to the thread spool and snip it with a sharp scissors. If you make that cut with the thread under tension and just hit it with a razor blade, the thead ends will almost always explode / unravel and some of those stray ends will often end up hung in your wrap after the pull-thru. The thread you're pulling under should be no longer than necessary to grab it for the final trim (a coupla inches) and it should have a very clean cut, fuzz-free end prior to pulling it under the wrap.

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Cool Hand

If you do decide to flame the threads, be very careful and put the flame, bic ect, on top of the rod; and only as close as necessary. That way you will not have to deal with the soot issue. If you approach from below you can scorch the thread and have loads of soot.

smile.gif

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Cool Hand, not to worry if you are having troubling the thread and the alcohol trick doesnt

work. Just trim the thread as close as possible with out damaging the wrap. Put a coat of flex coat or what ever finish you are using on the wraps. When the first coat dries simply and carefully use a razor to slice off the little spike of thread that will be sticking up on the finished wrap and you are done. Hope this helps. rolleyes.gif

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I found that out when after doing the handle and such I put a freshwater casting blank on the blocks and just made a random wrap to practice...that came out great except for the "fuzz" where I cut the thread and then pulled it through the wraps. Now I know with two coats of finish I can trim any bumps/fuzz after the first coat but I am curious.

 

Yeah I am using GB "A" on a basic Flex Coat hand wrapper with Flex Coat thread tensioners...I also have an egg sinker on top of the spool as well sinc I was afarid of having the tensioner too tight and having it bind..which I guess it really cant do but hey what do I know.

 

I put up some pics of my "station" so you guys can bust my stones.

 

another way to finish a wrap is to just begin to pull the loose end under the wrap and stop, use a small pair of manicure sissors to cut the thread long enough to pull through but short enough not to show. jam your thumb on it, pull.

 

i use a #4 mono loop for this and and cover it with 6-8 wraps. this wil give 4-5 wraps holding the tag end.

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The simpliest method to cut thread w/o having it unravel is place your thumb or finger on the wraps at the end to hold them, then turn rod backwards to take tension off thread. A minimal turn is all thats required, just enough to relieve tension, then I use fine nose fly tying ssissors made by Zephr. Cut the thread, and put it thru your pulling loopand pull thread until it closes up to wrap, then cut thread leaving less than a 1/16 inch. I cut my thread almost even tith pull loop. When you pull out the loop, the thread end will remain under wrap securing it in place.

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