Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
rockfisherman

Cold Water Yak Survival Clothing

19 posts in this topic

I have been researching clothing for cold water yakking and survival in the unlikely event of capsizing.

 

The alternatives seem to be:

 

1. Farmer John wetsuit with no arms, or O'Neill surfboarders wetsuit that has free arm movement. It will allow you to survive, but it will be cold...and it will retain your sweat while paddling. About $110.

 

2. Drysuit. $400. Comfortable in the water, hard to get into, but more freedom of movement than the wetsuit. Two divers at work told me they hate drysuits and would rather be cold.

 

3. Fabric called Polartec 2000. Polarfleece with a stretchable neoprene like coating. Intended for cold weather yakking or sports where you aren't in the water by choice all the time. $105. Looks like the best bet right now. Further research is necessary.

 

4. Neoprene waders cinched down with a

belt, and a waterproof top. Cost: waders only since I don't have neoprenes, and I have a waterproof wading jacket. Probably the least safe of the options. I dunno, I tried some neoprenes on, and they were tight like a wetsuit. One reason I didn't buy them...but would have the desired effect. What's the diff between the waders and a wetsuit? They are both neoprene, right?

 

What says the board??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rock, I kayak fish for enjoyment....someone on this board said once that he uses the formula: the air temp + the water temp have to add up to 80 degrees before he will go out. Otherwise he stays home!

 

I thought about that and adopted the same idea. I am too old for SEAL survival training or to consider the risk as half the fun of the trip. I plan to return 100% of the time from every trip I take. If death by hypothermia is part of the senario I will elect a dbl Crown Royal whiskey sour and an order of ribs with friends over fishing with any of the above protective apparel 100% of the time.

 

In short you have to know when to say when! wink.gifwink.gif No fish is worth leaving one's loved ones in mourning. Fish smart /fish safe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, the rule of thumb for survival is that air temp plus water temp must add to 100.

 

80 just does not work. 35 degree water and 45 degree air? 40 degree water and 40 degree air? 45 degree water and 35 degree air? Sea water very rarely freezes.

 

What's the diff between a wetsuit and waders?

 

The wetsuit has so much flotation, divers must wear a weight belt to stay down. A wetsuit is SO bouyant, it almost makes a PFD superflous.

 

If waders fill with water, not only are you cold, but it's impossible to remount your kayak. While water can't be heavier than watere, and you won't plunge to the bottom, the fact is that the weight of the water in your waders will prevent you from mounting your kayak.

 

If waders DON'T fill with water, the wader belt that kept the water out will serve to trap air in your wader's legs, making them like water wings for your feet. THEY will float, leacing you to struggle full time to keep your UPPER torso (including your head) above water.

 

IMHO, the wetsuit is the way to go! Full size is warmer than Farmer Jugn, but less flexible. TRY TRY TRY before you BUY, or it could be BYE-BYE.

 

 

Flounder

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i fish the cold weather, cold water and have used the waders, wading jacket combo. I am definitely nervous about going over in cold water. I have looked into drysuits/survival suits but the cheapest one I have found was $729. I don't know...do you buy the suit that costs more than the yak, do you continue to go out in the wader, wading jacket combo or do you buy a boat for cold weather fishing? Cause I know I can't say no to fishing even if it's cold.

 

[This message has been edited by pmjasper (edited 12-23-2001).]

 

[This message has been edited by pmjasper (edited 12-23-2001).]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm confident in the gear that I'm using and my ability HOWEVER I am very cautious of where I'll go fishing when its cold out. If in doubt I don't go. That's my motto. Be safe, not sorry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are several conditions that qualify as cold weather kayaking. Warm water/cold air, cold water/cold air and warm air/cold water. And obviously there are varying degrees of cold. You won't find a single solution for everything. Neoprene has to pretty thick for very cold water and Farmer Johns may not be enough, paddling with a heavy neo top can be brutal. Drysuits can cover a lot since you can layer for different temps but you can easily over dress in warm air. I've started with what gets me thru more of the season but it's not going to suit all conditions. If it's very cold I just have to stay off the water until I get more stuff. Don't worry, if you stick with it you'll own everything sooner or later. biggrin.gif

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, one more thing. I haven't researched but I believe most of the products like Polartec 2000 are the equal of only very thin neoprene, not for very cold conditions if used alone.

Actually two things. I don't know what yr wading top is exactly. You need a top that's not going to allow water in. Paddling jackets have seals at all openings which are, to varying degrees, watertight.

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for you concern, and for your comments. I have no intention of becoming a statistic and safety always comes first. Hence, the post. The polartec 2000 is the equiv of 2 or 3 mil neoprene, I believe. The article I read on it recommended it for cold weather boating. It sounded more comfortable than the wet or dry suit, as it was designed to be worn where immersion was a possibility rather than a certainty like in diving. I have a wading jacket that is tight around the torso, and has cuff seals. I didn't like the idea of the jacket and the waders, I really don't now after hearing the comments. REI.com has a drysuit for $395. Now the clothes are approaching the cost of the yak. As I said, if the Polartec 2000 is a viable option, I saw a suit for $105, that would be reasonable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a polartec which is great however I wouldn't use it with water below 50 degrees unless I was with a group. A 5 - 7 mm full wetsuit or a farmer john with a wetsuit jacket is definitely a better bet when going solo along with full neoprene gloves.

 

Tried the Kokatat gortex dry suit, its great if you can deal with the hangman's noose effect ( I can't). Also if you get one get it with the booties - eliminates feeling like you have amputated feet. Kokatat can also build one with shorter sleeves and or legs if you can wait. All the options are costly but the most expensive suit will seem cheap if you go overboard while solo.

 

raregroove

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

O.K here I go again one more time.A Wet suit is great only If 1) you are in the water most of the time and or the air is warm!!.When it is real cold out you need a minimum of a 5/4 wetsuit.Have any of you guys

paddled in a 5 mil suit???I have and it is way to constricting.Get it wet and then get out of the water and back on your kayak.You will soon learn about evaporative cooling.Go ahead and freeze your a.. off.In cold conditions a drysuit is the only safe option.

(for a SOT kayak).As far as being way to expensive you have got to be kidding me!!!

As far as the person who said that his diving friend hated wearing drysuits compared to what???.was he paddling/fishing?

If you are kayak surfing in the winter then a wet suit will work well because you are constantly getting wet and your paddling distances are short.Do I consider myself an expert on this subject??At the risk of sounding like an arrogant jerk,Yes.I have been surfing year round, snow storms and all for almost 20 years as well as having done repair and salvage work under ice.Even taking all the precautions with the right equipment you still are not guaranteed complete safety.I am waiting to hear about someone dying because of some of the information I see floating around here.Some of you keep propagating it in the name of saving some money.I did not intend to offend anyone with this rant but I thought it needed to be said

Doug M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug M.,

 

Glad to hear your rant. This is exactly what I was looking for. Input from someone who has actually used the gear. I have never used dry or wetsuits, and have never cold water yakked -- that's why I asked.

 

I was the one with the diver friend who hates drysuits. I should clarify...when he dives, he uses wetsuits, and when he kayaks in cold water, he uses a drysuit, even tho he doesn't like the fit.

 

Sounds like a drysuit is the way to go if you are considering cold water yakking. Thanks for your input...and I agree, someone could die in a cold water accident based on "I think this will work" without real first hand knowledge.

 

[This message has been edited by rockfisherman (edited 12-23-2001).]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This isnot as simple a choice as it it seems. Their are wetsuits and drysuits made for a variety of different uses ,out of different materials,and with different seam construction. Iv,e said it many times before and Ive written about them extensivly on my website. But Oneil wetsuits and drysuits are the ONLY way to go. They are not cheap nor are they the most expensive. They are the lightest,stretchiest,warmest,best warrantied suits in the world.

Barrell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guys,

Not to promote any products, but I work for the folks that make Goretex. I have the ablilty to purchase items thru a company operated store at up to 50% off. If any one is interested in any of the full immersion suits and other Goretex products, please e-mail me and I can find out if I can get it. If it is possible I'll do what I can to help any of you get what I feel is an inceadible line of products for wear in and on the water.

 

Bob

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.