Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
JonS

Wader Safety

18 posts in this topic

Did anyone catch the 5 minute segment on ESPN2 this AM? If you didn't they were showing, in the water, how neoprene and breathables act when you are dumped. It wasn't from a kayak but from the perspective of you falling in, slipping, etc. while wading. Both were stockingfoot waders.

 

Point Made by show. The specific gravity of water, whether it is inside waders or out, is the same. Its the same water so you won't sink. It does however make it very difficult when getting out of the water. It is a myth that waders filled with water will sink you.

 

Neoprenes - they float. On the show he purposely filled the waders with water. He floated.

 

Breathables - they trap air. On the show they stated that with the addition of a waist belt or wading belt this phenomina is enhanced and the waders act like lifepreservers for you legs.

 

PFDs were not used on the show, as the approach was from wading and being swept into the river, etc. perspective.

 

Here's what I surmised. With the addition of a jacket with a good closure system and especially the waist and the PFD you have a lot of flotation. Will water get in eventually, yes? Is it the right system for everywhere? Probably not. In the surf a wetsuit is superior, but for the majority of environments its what I'm going to wear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jon I agree with you 100%.As you know I also wear the wader/dry top combo a good part of the year.Just make sure the water temp is at a temp that is survivable if you dump and fill the waders.I have filled my waders after getting caught on sand bars and can vouch that they will not sink you but getting out is the problem.You might have to take off the waders to get back in the yak if they fill because they are HEAVY

 

Doug M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just think of something along this line this morning (I LOVE lazy Sundays).

 

For the most part, do you guys wear a wadrer belt if you also are wearing a stripping basket while wade fishing? I usually do, b/c my old basket was a homemade creation, but this season I will be using the Orvis basket which has a belt included. Just wondering if it is necessary to wear my wader belt AND the stripping basket belt. My thought at this time is to wear both, in case I take a spill and need to take the basket off while in the water.

 

Any thoughts? Thanks for the post, JonS.

 

------------------

Joe

Stranded in Albany

GO NAVY

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having "run out" of beach a couple of times, I have learned that a snug wader belt can make alot of difference in the amount of water you'll take on. I always wear a belt; on the beach or in the yak.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jon,

I don't think very many, at least on this forum, ever argued that you wouldn't float in neo or breathable waders. It's always the getting back in the boat with them full of water thing. Keep the water out, at least most of it and for long enough, and they're fine. I don't think that's very hard to do, but to me that's the essential part. I wouldn't be thinking I'd just take them off to re-saddle either, I have a hard time just getting them off at the car. Try it with the other stuff you'll be wearing like a jacket and PFD, which you'll be taking off first or loosening, and in 45 degree water, which it might be if you need to wear waders in the first place. Just be smart abt it and practise self rescue in what you wear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saw the segment, yea it was good information. Especially where he actually got it the water and showed you he floated. Opened the waders and allowed water in and still floated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I caught the segment, too. Very good.

 

A long time ago, Joe Brooks was in a video where he dove off a bridge with open canvas type waders and no belt to demonstrate the same thing. Forget where I saw this.

 

Even with the Orvis stripping basket, I always wear a wader belt, to answer JoeB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was Lee Wulff, not Joe Brooks, who did the bridge-diving thing with waders..... smile.gif

 

My .02 waders vs westsuit/farmer johns in kayaking. I figure if I capsize (which I never have accidentally; only on purpose to see what it would be like) that I'm gonna be swimming for a while, either getting everything back together and getting back in or on the yak. Or else I'm gonna be swimming to drag stuff to shore if it's close enough.

If I'm gonna be swimming, I'd rather swim in a farmer john wetsuit than in waders.

 

When wade fishing, I wear waders, of course, which are more comfortable.

 

Again, this argument has been around here a lot off and on. So do suit yourselves. Just my .02.

 

--OJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To answer Joe B, I would definately have the wader belt on. The stripping basket is a perriferal, the wading belt an essential.

 

Here's my setup. Whatever layers that I need underneath. They are moderm fabrics that still insulate if wet. Then I have on my stockingfoot, breathable waders. They have a built in belt which is cinched down. Next I have a wide elastic wading belt. The next item is my Black Rock Jacket which has an excellent waist closure system. Over the jacket goes a PFD. The weakness of this system is the neck seal. I don't want to wear a rubber gasketed top but if one does its water tight and the same closure as a dry suit. I don't really dump but if I did I'd expect a little sepage in the neck if I had my head under the water. The PFD keeps it out.

 

This is not the ideal setup for very cold water. I feel that a dry suit is the best. Next would be a wetusuit. I know guys who use the above method and have a wetsuit underneath the breathables rather than fleece, etc. That's certainly a good way to go. It provides another layer of insulation and protection from the water.

 

 

 

[This message has been edited by JonS (edited 03-17-2002).]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What would you recommend for sit inside options with waders? I was going to get some waist high neoprenes and then snug them at waist with a belt. Would this be suitable for water temps from 50 degrees on up, or would the breathables be the way to go?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jon, what do you wear on your feet to keep them warm? Wondering whether theres an option thats light enough for the boat but has support in case one chooses to fish the surf. Thanks..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yakman, it really depends upon where I'll be. If its only sand I wear a pair of kayak booties that don't have a lot of support. This past fall I got a pair of the NRS Wetshoes. I was going to get the Workboot, which Marksharky has, but they didn't have my size. So the Wetshoe was the next model down. Its everything I could have wanted in a kayak shoe. Great sole that's terrific on rocks and provides lots of support. I don't get cold in it either. You can check them both out at www.nrsweb.com

 

fishmusicin, either will do. Just get yourself a good top to keep the water out should you end up in the water. Should you dump a SIK (sit in kayak) in deep water you're not going to be able (most likely) to get back in (depending upon the kayak model). So you might have to swim to shore with the yak. You have to be dressed to protect yourself from getting both wet and cold. Neoprene fits snugger then breathables but is less comfortable. I own both but I rarely wear the neoprenes. They're a backup and loaner.

 

 

I'd like to hear what others think on this subject as its the most important thing that we deal with in this sport. Cold water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to beg to differ with JonS on one small point there. To say that, if you paddle a traditional decked kayak (SINK) and take a swim in deep water, you are unlikely to get back in, is not correct. Self-rescue is a viable and necessary part of deep-water paddling, no matter what kind of boat you have.

 

Certain boats, however, do stack the deck against you if you wet exit. Decked boats with large, open cockpits (generally without spray skirts) and no bulkheads are the worst. They fill with water very rapidly and should you manage to re-board you will have a monumental pumping task ahead of you with a boat that is wallowing in the water. Most SOT's are pretty easy to re-board but you must use care to not get seperated from your boat. SINK's are nice 'cause rolling is easy once learned. Until that point, consideration must be given to another self-rescue option.

 

Learning self-rescue techniques is not optional (SOT or SINK). If you paddle a SINK and don't learn and practice these techniques (paddle float rescue, stirrup rescue, various rolls, re-enter and roll, etc.) you are inviting serious trouble in deep water.

 

To me, the first line of defense should be a roll. A wet exit in deep water immediately reduces your chances of a happy ending. If you don't have a roll or your roll fails (tangled in fishing line?) then you wet exit and use another technique. I've had success (in practice) with a re-enter and roll but others may find their strength comes elsewhere.

 

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.