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barrell

Delivery from hell

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I get a call monday "hello this is the truck driver, I have a load of kayaks to deliver you from Hobie Ill be there (scranton,Pa) in a couple hours" I say look at the bottom of the shipping order see where it says 48 hours notice needed before delivery? Thats because im 300 miles away from my wharehouse in Atalantic City.

He says "Oh yeah, I didnt see that.

So he goes and finds a motel and I jump in the truck and drive to scranton that night. next morning hes waiting at the dirt road he must back up a 1/4 mile to my barn where I wharehouse all my yaks. But hes not the greatest truck driver and he gets stuck. I cant get my truck past him so I run 1/4 mile up the moutainside to find some heavy rope to try to get him out. After breaking 1 1/2 nylon rope three times I go and look for help I find a dump truck who offers to pull him out and does. Now I dont feel like asking him to try again so we decide to unload and leave $50,000.00 worth of Hobies on the side of the paved road and he finally leaves. I spend the rest of the day running my 12 foot trailer back and forth from the paved road up to my barns with the kayaks. Ever time I got up to the barns I had to unload as fast as possible worried that somebody traveling on the road would pull over and help themselves. I started at 9am and finished getting everything in the barn and 5 pm. I had to pick up and move 5,000 pounds of kayaks 5 times so you do the math I carried 25,000 pounds on my back yesterday. Theose outfitter tandems and 16 foot Adventures are heavy suckers.

Barrell

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You guys think Hobies are heavy, there is a reason that a little wheight helps with foot propulsion. The mirage drive creates tremendous torque. When you first start out on a hobie the first couple kicks are not impressive. But by the 8th,9th,10th, kick the boat realy gets hummin. The forward momentum caarying all that mass goes against the tide like its not even there. Chop and slop are knocked out of the way as all the mass drives through it. I dont beleive a lighter hobie would be able to punch through the chop like the outback does. I think if they made it to light it would bounce up and over chop and become a wet boat. Against a strong tide I have yet to run into a paddle boat that can keep up eith the hobie. I was paddling last year with a guy that had a 16 tarpon/ With the tide he and I stayed side by side both of us going hard. But when it came time to go back to the parking lot against the tide I hit the bech 300 yards ahead of him in only a half mile paddle. It suprised both of us because the 16 tarpon looks realy fast and is when no tide blocks its way.

April 1st I have a full 54 foot container of old towns coming (130 boats) I hope that truck driver can back up to the barn. he usualy leaves the trailor for 4 or 5 days to give me time to empty it.

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That stinks. I would've gladly driven an hour or so to Scranton to help you if I could've swapped some manual labor for a dowpayment on an Outback. wink.gif

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Sorry Barrel, I have a great respect for the Hobie designs and I'm sure there is a reason for making them as heavy as they do but if they were lighter they would be faster under any conditions. The Mirage drive is especially effective at slower speeds and when the going gets rough all yaks slow down but the hobie slows down less. This is not because of torque per se. Torque is turning force. The turning force of each vane is cancelled by the other leaving only the forward thrust. As speed increases, this thrust diminishes even though you might peddle faster. There are a lot of kayaks out there that can outrun an Outback in a 1/4 mile but not in the first fifty yards if any at all. The Adventurer adds a new dimension that for open water may be the best of all worlds, higher speed and still the low end grunt that will get you home when the wind forecast is wrong again.

Now I could be wrong about this but then Newton would be too so if you are overweight and want to go faster switch to salads.

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I am no engineer nor do I know alot about physics but I was the first fisherman in theese parts to use the Hobies and have acumulated many hours on it since the mrage drive was invented.

I also am a fanatic deer hunter. October and november I could care less about fishing I hunt with bow and gun nationwide. Any bow hunter has learned that a heavy arrrow will penetrate a deer completely and exit the other side producing a quik kill. The heavier arrow having more mass ie not slowed down when it meets resistance.A light arrow may not. I guess what I should have specified in the above post is that in rough chop and strong tides a heavier hobie is faster than a light one would be. I amazed at some of the nasty crap I go out in and never have any problem punching my way through it in the outback. I spent over 20 years paddling and many times found myself struggling to paddle against strong tides and chop.

Light kayaks just like light power boats go up and come pounding down in close chop. I beleive the outbacks wheight is the secret behind its level dry ride in the rough stuff. I may be seeing things wrong but without a light outback to test out I stick to what I have observed. On a lake with no wind lighter is faster.

Barrell

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A couple years ago I had a very small woman who bought a Cobra explorer. She struggled with it . It did not track as well as I told her it would. One day she was trying to ride waves,getting tossed upside down one wave after another. She said she noticed that the yak was paddling around so much better for her. She went for a spin down the beach and said it paddled perfect like I told her it would. When she came back into the beach she struggled to get it out of the water. Opening it up she found that the boat had collected a gallon or two of water from all her wipeouts.

She now always adds a gallon of water to the inside of the hull before going for a paddle. Now was her better performance because the extra wheight helped push the side hulls down onto the waters surface where they belong? Was it because the water in the hull lowered her center of gravity resulting in increased stability? Was it because the extra wheight increased the mass and helped her keep the boat on course in the rough chop off the beach? I dont know, but it gives you a few things to think about.

Barrelll

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As a simple matter of physics the same paddler with the same effort can't make the same yak go faster if it weighs more. The heavier the boat the more water it displaces and the more that has to be pushed out of the way. When the water gets rough the lighter boat rides higher and doesn't have to punch through as much of the oncoming wave. Of course there are other odd variables that could make a winged kayak with a light paddler pitch and roll but that's a rare exception.

Go ahead and put an extra 25 or 30 pounds in the hull and clock it with a GPS. If you can go faster peddling all out I'll buy you lunch at a place of your choice.

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The outback seems to be the perfect wheight as it is, making it heavier probably wont help it punch through chop any better. What I question is will a lighter outback,which I concede would be faster on flat water, not perform as well in the rough stuff. And would a lighter outback maintain its forward momentum .

Barrell

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In order for the Outback to be a perfect weight the paddler would have to be too. It's the total amout of water that's displaced that counts. The lighter combination would not have as much forward inertia but since it isn't displacing as much water it doesn't need it.

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create a turnaround so the driver dosent have to back up.

couldnt he back up at all? so you didnt have to unload the yaks in view of the main road? take a snuffie along for a ride next time ''just in case''

have fun with the long boxcwm27.gif

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We dont have room for a turnaround. The barns are to close together for a 54 footer. The trucks have been backing up at this location for at least 10 years. I dont think this guy was as experienced.

What is a snuffie?

Barrell

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