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Leo R

Questions for the experts

31 posts in this topic

I'm new to the world of yak fishing and am confused by the multitude of yaks from which to choose. I know this, I definitely want a SOT.

I visited a local dealer today who showed me the Heritage Fisherman. He said it is very stable (secondary stability I guess) because of the wide sponson width compared to waterline width. The explanation does seem logical but is it just good salemanship?

This model doesn't have provision for a rudder or skeg and from what I've been able to determine, having one is an advantage as it helps you to go straight. Any comments on that?

The dealer will be getting is some OK Scrambler XTs so I'll be able to test ride both if I wish.

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Leo I am no expert but you got it right.Rudder does help keep you going straight.Lots of yaks out there.Check them out then go and try a couple.

I think the model you are talking about has not been to user friendly for some one who has one now.You can do a search and find out more .

GoodLuck

JoeV

 

------------------

Always Wishin I Was Yak Fishin

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I'll go ahead and recommend the XT. That is a stable boat and very fishable. It does well in the surf and is fairly easy to paddle a far piece in. Not a bad choice for a first boat. The Heritage is harder to turn due to the skeg-in-the ends design, and not "as Stable" as the XT IMHO. The Dart is faster-perhaps heavier. Dart is more stable sittin sideways to swells. Neither have rudders. Rudders are not required on a fishing yak. Most rudder designs on SOT's are for tracking and trimming, not turning. There was a post last year here on SOl about a dart that was like a bucking bronco or something. Never paddled a Sea Dart, but have logged many an hour in the Sea of Cortez in a Scrambler XT.

 

There are dozens of cool boats on the market.

 

Sharp1

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I don't consider myself and expert but rather someone farther up the learning curve than you.

 

The Dart is not a good beginner kayak IMHO and isn't versatile enough to be a primary fishing kayak for this region. There are too many environments where its a terrible choice. Its a more advanced ride too. Its a nice addition to a quiver. Since you're starting out a more forgiving and versatile kayak like the Scrambler XT is much better choice. Others to look at are the Cobra Explorer and Navigator in this genre.

 

I bet the salesman doesn't fish from a kayak either. Is this shop in Westchester or western CT.

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I have had both. I would look around more before making a decision.

 

These boats are at opposite ends of the SOT spectrum. The Sea Dart/Fisherman is a very dry, fast, good tracking boat. The lack of initial stability can make it disconcerting for the beginner. The XT is a very stable, versatile, fast turning, but relatively slow boat (but faster than say the Cobra Fish & Dive and the Malibu II). The problem with the XT is that it is a cold wet ride. No problem in hot weather but in the spring and fall it's a challenge. If you want to do a lot of surfing you should get it because there's nothing else that surfs and fishes as well.

 

Most other SOTs are in between in terms of performance and handling charcteristics. I would look at few other boats like the Cobra Explorer, WS Ride, and the Perception Swing before making a decision.

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Santiogo, Fish and dive's are not as slow as many people keep saying.I dont know how that rumor started but anyone who owns one can keep up with an explorer.

Barrell

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barrell,

I have notice the F&Ds seem to get going Ok; it is just that they stop immediately when you let up. They don't glide far. Seems like most of the tupperware wants to go about 3 1/2 mph...

Sharp1

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SII - I beg to differ, my Dolphin is an awesome surfing boat. It's pedigree is in the big waves in Hawaii. cwm12.gif

 

Sharp1, you're nearly on the money with that estimate; I'd say it's pretty close to average. In the 15 miles I paddled yesterday, I tended to run at about 3.8 knots (on the GPS) with moderate effort. Glide is where some boats really shine. Mine does faily well, the Cobras not so well 'cause of the odd hull shape and excessive beam, lots of others in between or at the extremes.

 

I've said this dozens of times but I'll keep on 'til I'm blue in the face. Beginners make terrible decisions about which boats to buy. Initial stability is judged waaaayy too highly and folks end up upgrading later (esp. after a long paddle wink.gif ), usually to a faster boat.

 

I took my wife who had only about 6 hours paddling experience, put her in a CLC Chesapeake 16LT that we built (16' x 23.5") and had her out in 2' breaking chop on her second day on the water.

 

It takes so little time to acclimate to the feel of a kayak that I recommend two options for beginners: 1) Paddle lots of different boats (inc. some seriously skinny, fast, unstable ones), in varying conditions, for sufficient amounts of time (sufficient to learn well the "feel" of each and why one pleases you more than another), before you decide to buy, or 2) Jump into something that enough others fish from and recommend, and buy it without test paddling. Naturally, option 1 is better but if you go with option 2, you'll be used to the feel within a couple of days then have all season to enjoy your decision.

 

Chris

 

[This message has been edited by Porter (edited 04-01-2002).]

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Leo, I'm in Rockaway, so I'm right near you. Where do you plan on using the kayak and what types of fishing and gear do you like to use? Also what's your height, weight, inseam, transport vehicle, relative strength, name of first born (if you have) wink.gif. If you give us more info it will help.

 

I agree with Porter on some of what he says but a lot depends upon where you plan on using a yak. There are many places in our area that I fish that require a short yak. A short yak will fish the ocean and open bays but a long yak won't fish a third of the places I fish around here. So how you plan on using the yak is very important.

 

Lastly the FnD, Explorer and Navigator are very close in the speed department. I've spent a lot of time in all 3. Speedsters they aren't but they aren't slugs either.

 

[This message has been edited by JonS (edited 04-01-2002).]

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Wow, so many opinions about speed and wetness. For those who asked, I mostly flyfish, I'm 6'2" and 215 lbs. I plan to use the yak, initially, in protected waters such as the backside of Sandy Hook (Horseshoe Cove, Plum Island, Spermacetti Cove, etc) and the shoreline of Raritan Bay.

Someone on the board mentioned that the Scrambler XT is a wet ride and others like the Wilderness Ride is relatively dry. Why is that? Is it because the scupper holes are open? If so, why not plug them? Or is it due to hull design, such as allowing wave spray to enter? I notice with the Dolphin, the bow seems to be a more pronounced vee shape. Anyone care to comment?

Finally, elsewhere on the page JonS is running a post asking "who we are ..." I informally reviewed that and found that the dominant yaks are Cobra Explorers, Navigators, and FnD. While this may be a result of someone's excellent salemanship, it would be nice to know how long these yakers have had these models and whether or not they would buy the same one again.

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I'm a #2-fer. I bought my Tourer having been in about 3 yaks in my lifetime during vacations. When I bought the Tourer, I was anticipating that I will out-grow the Navigator I was initially going to buy. In my area that I intend to fish, I will need to zig-zag a few miles each way. That is why I went with a faster boat. I know I will be a better seaman and more adept at handling fish and boat as time passes and then I will appreciate the capabilities of my Tourer. Hope this helps.

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Porter is right on the mark...Forget the "paddle as many boats as you can" you can not make a decision based on just paddling a kayak with out experience, I think about my fist day out there checking out yaks, they could have gave me a couple of 2x4's to paddle and I woundnt have known the difference. Again people when they start out will put to much into primary stability and they will out grow that stable yak very fast. I think there are much better yaks than the sea dart

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Hi Leo, I'm 6'1" and 212 lbs. and use a Perception Swing. I have no problems with speed or maneuverability, handles great in the swells or heavy chop beyond the surf zone.

 

It's like buying a car, everyone has their own opinion on what is the best one suited to your needs. Odds are whatever they are paddling now is the best until they purchase something else. You really have to make the effort to demo as many different makes and models as possible. This can make you eliminate quite a few and get you down to just a couple of good possibilities, before you make your final decision.

Good Luck, Terry

 

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