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JD

best yak tip

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Had my yak out tonight for the second time, still getting the feel of everything. I have taken everyones advice and not installed anything until I'm more familiar and know where I'm going to want things. I was curious what you all think the is the best tip to give a newbie is? A paddling trick, casting, landing a fish...whatever. I'm tyring to speed up the learning curve a little.smile.gif

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. I was curious what you all think the is the best tip to give a newbie is? A paddling trick, casting, landing a fish...whatever. I'm tyring to speed up the learning curve a little.smile.gif[/b]

 

Your own experiences will be your best teacher.Don't rush just enjoy.Everytime you go out you will learn something new. I have been fishing for 40 years and I still learn something everytime I go out.

 

John

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JD,

Just had my yak out today for the first time. Loved it, even though I didn't catch much. Listen to these guys, they know. I'm more newbie than you. I plan to go out again tomorrow. I, like you, have not installed anything yet, just getting a feel for the boat. All I can say is, don't be afraid of the boat, I was real conservative today, and when I got back to the launch site I started messing around. Sitting sidesaddle is easy and very cooling on hot days, I just wish I had done it earlier in the day. I had fun, hope you did too. I think paddle clips will be my first install. I really could have used em.

 

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A few tips, lets see don't lean to far over or your gonna tip smile.gif I was out this am & after a year in that thing almost went over for the second time, first was last year when I was test driving it with Barrel. Trolling with 2 rods can be a bit difficult if you get a fish on & don't get it in quick oh yeah I had this happen this am & got into a bit of a bind wink.gif So 1 may suffice, up to you.

I don't think you really need a teaser ahead of the plug , taking care of 2 fish at the same time in such small quarters can also become a bit of lets say an adrenalin RUSH!

Know the area you are fishing in or go with a buddy & watch the weather , good luck & have fun your gonna heart.gif it!

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The best way to accelerate the learning curve is to tag along with other, more experienced kayak anglers. If you can go out fishing with some of the fabeled East Coast Guides, like Barrell and JonS, you can learn a years worth of lore on just one outting.

 

Keep a log of your fishing from the yak. Buy some disposable waterproof cameras and shoot a bunch of images while on the water and at the launch. These will help you to remember the details of the trip and you'll learn faster as a result of being able to review the experiences between adventures. You can also post reports on SOL that way.Get leashes/tethers on all of your gear. Oh yeah-Sunscreen...

 

S1

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You will receive tons of tips on all matters of kayacking and fishing, all worthwhile.

The following are not tips, they are "must do's".

Get a GOOD PFD that's comfortable that you will wear.

Practice your recovery/ re-entry. Be able to do it in adverse conditions.

 

There are many others that you "need" and "must have", but you can't use your signaling device if you ain't floatin, and you can't recover if your energy has been expended trying to stay afloat.

 

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2nd beagle's comments except would add dress as if you are going for a swim everytime.

Pretty much everything else is secondary and will come in time if you survive and enjoy yr time on the water.

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Best bit of advice: go fish.

Second best bit of advice: go fish with company. Nothing beats time on the water except maybe time on the water with good company. Fishing will raise and answer most of your questions. This board and a couple of others should answer most of the rest. Keeping a log is a really good idea (I just started keeping a log)as it helps you to remember all those q and a's when you plop down on the sofa exhausted with that big grin you can't get rid of.

 

------------------

Wali

<'(((<<

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Practice the falling out and getting in thing because if you know how to fish before you bought the yak nothing has changed there. But if you read the post on the poor guy that fell out and couldn't get back in then you'll know the best tip was mentioned above and now here.

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All advice so far right on the money, but here is something I have not seen mentioned in a long time. Carry all required Coast Guard approved signaling devices. 1st, a loud water proof whistle. 2nd, a signal mirror. 3rd, A good waterproof flashlight. 4th, signal flares and as an added attractor, dye packs.

 

I think the minimum is the whistle and flashlight, and mirror. I personally go overboard and carry flares, dyepacks, a submersible VHF radio, cell phone in a watertite container and a first aid kit. Granted, whether I'm fishing or just out for a paddle, I usually go for a good distance, minimum of 5 miles average around 10. I have been seen upto 3 miles out in the ocean and called a lunatic by family and friends!

 

I am going to look further into the minimum required by the C.G. and will post more later, unless someone beats me to it. You have to remember, you can be "boarded" and put through a safety inspection the same as any power or sail boat, and ticketed.

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PFD and audible signal like a whistle might actually be all that the USCG requires, plus a flashlight in the dark. Daytime signals like a mirror are only required for larger or powered boats.

 

I posted a link for an adobe download of USCG regs. It also has inland navigation rules so if you know them, and if the yahoo speeding towards knows them, you could be pretty sure which side he will be waking you on. smile.gif

Do a quick search or I'll dig it out again.

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Ok here is a link to the Coast Guard Auxilliary web site. There are two many regs to go thru to post individually, but quite a few do pertain to "manually propelled watercraft". http://www.cgaux.org/cgauxweb/public/boatregs.htm

You really should look thru this, there are also links to each indvidual state, too.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Bob

 

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