Deadwood

Raritan river stripers

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I've heard the term tribe mentioned regarding the bass that spawn in the chesapeake and the hudson on SOL . Would the bass spawning in the raritan be their own separate tribe or are these offshoots of another tribe?

The last few years I've noticed an increase in bigger early spring raritan bay stripers, could this be the result of these raritan river spawners getting a firm foothold in the river?

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The dam busting has helped them a lot, as well as shad movements in the river.
True, as well as forage like herring and eels. The more baby making the stripers do , the better. I hope the removal of the dams gives the stripes another legit nursery. More fishing waters for them would be ok also. :)

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If and when there are striped bass spawning in the Raritan River, they would no doubt be Hudson River Tribe fish.The Opening up of the Raritan River may eventually be pioneered by Hudson River Striped Bass. there are a lot of factors that must come together to create a striped bass spawning environment. 307 HR striped bass yearlings were netted in the Navesink River in NJ, in the 1870's. That was the total of two separate small shipments of striped bass sent by transcontentinal railroad and released in San Francisco Bay. By 1901 those 307 fish had spread up and down San Francisco Bay and invested in several rivers. Fishermans Wharf in SF recorded landings of 1,000,000 pounds of striped bass. When the pacific bass were dna'd in the 80's they rang the bell as true Hudson River Tribe bass. The race/tribe designation was coined by AJ McClane in his New Standard Fishing Encyclopedia. First published in 1965 and updated and re released in 1998.

 

There are bigger rivers in New England that are a lot cleaner and they have not been suitable for striped bass spawning. The Current Race's or Tribe's of striped bass are located from North to South. Two Rivers in north eastern Canada host two seperate Races of Striped Bass. To be designated a seperate race or tribe their DNA needs to be 70% or more than the other Races or Tribe. For example the next race coming south is the Hudson River Tribe, it's DNA is between 70 and 80% different than the Chesapeake Bay Race. The next tribe moving sout is the Delaware River Tribe and then the Chesapeake Bay Tribe.

 

These three tribes are the only ones who migrate over long distances in Spring and summer. Her is a recent comment I sent to a Chesapeake Bay angler who used to live in CT and thought that one of those rivers has striped bass spawning in them.

 

"The Chesapeake Bay mess affecting Striped Bass is coming to a head. The CB Striped Bass Tribe is the most productive of all the migrating tribes. Chesapeake Bay, Hudson River and Delaware River Tribes. (CB, HR and DR.) CBT produces millions of YOY year class fish, but the bay's pollution in the first 3 years of a striped bass life cycle are wiping out the majority of that production before it can enter Atlantic Ocean migration cycle. Once those maturing fish are in the cycle they are only exposed to less than two months in the Chesapeake Estuary starting with their 6th or 7th year. And those two months are well before the toxic mess heats up in July, August and September. Between year 3 and year 6 those yoy class year fish remain in the clean and cold environment without exposure to the Chesapeake Bay at all.

 

The Hudson River Tribe is producing in a clean environment. The huge watershed that feeds the Hudson River provides a environment of freshwater tidal that is stable and clean. Check out the NYS DEC Hudson River Unit graphs for their YOY netting activities in late summer and the Striped Bass Female 8+ netting results in the spring while the striped bass are in the Hudson waiting for the magic 58 degree spawning temperature to allow them to release their eggs. The HR spawning area is between 100 and 125 miles of freshwater tidal water. The Hudson River pulls water from Lake Ontario, the Adirondack, Green, Catskill and Western Berkshire Rivers. Poor YOY production is related to a late spring Cold Front that occurs in the 72 hours period after the Major spawning events in the Hudson River Valley. That is a narrow window for nature to hit.

 

The Delaware River Tribe has a spotty environment in which to produce their annual YOY numbers. Snow melt and NY City Reservoirs in the Catskill Mountains create a freshwater lake from the Commander Barry Bridge over the Delaware River (Rte. 322) between Bridgeport, NJ and Chester, PA down river passing Marcus Hook,PA, Penns Grove, NJ, Deepwater, NJ, Under the Delaware Memorial Bridge (I-95), New Castle, DE, ending near the mouth of the C& D Canal opposite Salem, NJ and near St. Georges, Delaware. The spawning area is only 30 to 35 miles long.

 

The Delaware River SB Tribe was thought extinct, until DNA studies showed it was still alive and producing YOY below Philadelphia. Prior to the discovery of the "Freshwater Lake" effect created by Snow Pac and Spring Rains up river, this tripbe had been thought to be spawning up the river north of Philadelphia. The confusion was caused by striped bass caught feeding on River Herring well north of the PA/NJ reach of the River. From Philadelphia to Matamoris, NJ.In places like Port Jervis, Minisink Ford, Narrowsburg, Callicoon, Hankins and Hancock, NY.

 

The Winter of 2011/2012 was almost snow less. Some have called it the "Winter that wasn't." The "Snow Pac" never was created and the big Catskill Reservoirs didn't have to release water into the Tail water fisheries that have become famous trout streams and rivers that flow into the Delaware River. The Delaware River 2012 Spawning event was almost below minimal. The salinity of the water between the Commander Barry Bridge and the C&D Canal was too high to support a spawning effort by the majority of the DR SB Tribe. Very few DR SP striped bass spawned successfully in the Spring of 2012. The 2013 spawning environment is a little better, but with no snow pac to drive it, the DR SB Tribe will produce very little in comparison to the 20 years before 2012. We won't know the real numbers until the DR SB YOY netting is finished this fall.

 

I suspect a couple of rivers that flow into the Chesapeake Bay Estuary River produce much more YOY striped bass than the Delaware River does in a normal production year.

 

If we could transport the YOY CB SB to the stretch of freshwater between Philadelphia and Port Jervis,NY between early July and August before they move from their freshwater nurseries, it could secure the productivity of those prolific rivers and streams that flow into the polluted Chesapeake Estuary.

 

It might be time to start evaluating the possibility of capturing, transportation and release of YOY Class Year CB SB to cleaner environments in the cooler Rivers north of the Top of the Bay at Harve de Grace, MD".

 

 

The Albamarale Sound - Roanoke River Tribe spends most of its life cycle inside albermarle Spound with small migrations north to about Ocean City MD. The largest strriped bass ever caught was an AS-RR SB netted in Albamarle Sound many years ago. 125 pounds.

 

The Santee - Cooper River systems combine near Florence SC and north of a large dame is a huge freshwater lake that has wid striped bass producing in freshwater. the S - C SB tribe seldom ventures out of the salty estuary that leads up to the base of the dam from the Ocean. There is enough freshwater in the upper portion of the tidal area to support Tthis small tribes spawning efforts. The next tribe south is located in the Cape Fear, NC river. It is fighting its way back from near extinction by hybird striepd bass introduced intothe CFR. Hybirds do not reproduce, and the state of NC hatchery produced thousands of hybirds per year for almost 20 years. While they didn't reproduce, They did follow the wild strain of native striped bass up river to its spawning area and ate the eggs produced by the wild fish. NC saw the error of their ways and have quit producing hybird striped bass. It will take more than 20 years to eleminate the threat the hybirds represent.

 

The Savannah River in GA was designated a separate and distinct Race of Atlantic Striped Bass in the 1970' or early 1980's. they are pretty much a River Tribe. the last tribe is the St. John's River in Florida. they are a non=migration river tribe. but with a seaway connection across Florida to the Gulp of Mexico, the StJ SB have traveled to the west coast of Florida. The biologists in Florida and Ga are watching their western portion of the Tribe to see if they will break out into the Gulf and begin spreading in this new environment.

 

I can send you three studies by Rutgers on two east coast rivers they are studying to see if they are capable of striped bass production. One in South Jersey and thhe Saco River in Maine.

 

The Chesapeake Tribe spawns in hundres of rivers and streams that flow enouth sweetwater to sustain striped bass spawning. I believer the spring run off that dumps miles of milk choclate into raritan is too murkey to support a striped bass spawn. The clay it flow thru is an obstical to its becoming a productive spawning river for Striped bass. Even it it could support a spawn, with the pioneering ability of the Hudson River tribe in California, The river would be an adjunct to the Rudson River Tribe expanding numbers. Just because a river could support spawning, doesn't mean the fish that begin the process will evolve into a different DNA. The HR SB tribe in CA, OR, WA and British Columbia are still HR SP DNA. DNA is built over eons of breeding, not a historical one night stand in a river in NJ. ;)

 

 

So what do you think about exploring the possibility of creating a Chesapeake Bay YOY Rescue Service and once they are hatched, we move them to rivers in NJ that have fresh water nurseries Hackensack & Passaic River could handle that function. They both connect with NY Harbor and could easily create the transition from Freshwater to the protected saltwater in the lower Hudson, Hackensack and Passaic rivers. There are YOY HR SB that move down into NY Harbor and swim up the east river and filter into western LI Sound and grow to 18 inches in Ct and LI rivers for two years and then move out and migrate to New England in the spring, feed all summer and then migrate back south in the fall. They return to the Hudson River to spawn by their 8 year and continue to spawn through their 20th year.

 

It would be an interesting experiment to see if those 22 inch fish with CB SH DNA would follow the Chesapeake Tribe migration route to the VA Capes and NC coastal waters to winter over down then and migrate back north the next spring. they would be free of the internal tumors they are getting in year two in the polluted Chesapeake Bay and would only return tothe Chesapeake Bay for several week in March and April to spawn in the cool waters of Spring. After spawning they leave healty hale and hearty for the migration to the cold and bait rich waters of Stellwagen Bank and the Gulf of Maine.

 

We could guarntee healthy striped bass for the Chesapeake Bay region while they clean up the mess caused by Bib Chicken and the run off from the densely populated western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay.

 

A new 12 million gallon oil barge could make 3 to 5 free trips transporting YOY CB SB in freshwater to rivers up the coast all the way to Maine and off load the young fish to be released in the fresh water portions of those rivers to grow to 5 or 6 inches and then move down tothe salty end of those rivers to spend two more springs before making their first migration at sea.

 

It would be nice if the Oil barge Co. offered to do the trips before they are sold to haul fuel oil The oil companies could fund the collection and planting efforts and get the right to claim how conservation minded their companies are. The Federal Government could divert large portions of the Pittman Robinson Sporting Goods Excise Tax funds to pay the salaries of biologist and professional fishermen to capture YOY SB and then to receive them at the mouth of the Rivers and take them up above the Salt line.

 

How's that for thinking outside the box. Get Stripers Forever and CCA behind this politically and line up every sportsman's Club in the Federation of Sportsmen clubs in all the State to get involved and put the pressure on to Save the Chesapeake Striped Bass from extinction.

 

WHAT DO YOU THINK WILL HAPPEN WHEN THE CB Sb TRIBE CRASHES TO YOR ABILITY TOFISH FOR THE SMALLER PRODUCTIONS OF THE SHAKEY DELAWARE RIVER AND THE FULL EFFORT OF THE HUDSON RIVER TO MEET THE DEMAND.

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RJ takes us to school once again, impressive info as always!

 

I think, if a couple more key damns are removed and the river is restored to its natural free flowing state...we might be in business.

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RJ you are a striper scholar and I think you just fried my brain, I will read your post again tomorrow, great stuff thanks. Makes sense that HRT would hopefully occupy the Raritan. I believe that many moons ago the lower Hudson river and the current Raritan shared the same river bed. Maybe some ancient memories will steer some stripes up the old Raritan. ;)

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The Hudson River was created by a huge Glacier. I'm sure it covered all of upstate NY, NJ and a large pare to eastern PA. water running off it for eons cut the Hudson Canyon out to the Continental Shelf and it cut thru the shelf like a hot knife thru butter. It created all the rivers of the mid Atlantic states and the New England States.The Raritan River was part of the present that Glacier left us. The trench that is almost 300 feet deep and several miles long below the Bear Mountain Narrows was a product of force of water gouging out a deep river below those narrows. Striped Bass winter over in that trench by the thousands below the thermal layer and in the deep pockets it created off shore in the Atlantic.

 

We, Noreastern and mid Atlantic Americans are smack dab in the middle of one of the greatest living ocean migrations every year. Most of us are Striped Bass hounds. We love those. fish. they way they fight, the way they feed, the way they glide, through heavy surf effortlessly while we stand in awe to the power they exhibit before our eyes. Bluefish are the Yellow eyed devil. the "Mugger of the Oceans". A beast who lives only to eat. Strong, nasty and fast as hell. Weakfish (Sea Trout) are the glamor gals of the ocean. they sparkle,and surprise us with their power when we occasionally connect to them when their expand and contract life cycles. All three are tasty. bluefish need to be bled immediately as do weakfish too. Both need to be place in a ice cold cooler ASAP. Striped bass are made of tougher stuff. No need to bleed them, just get them in the cooler. Or as many of us do, just get them unhooked and back into the water. Then we catch the speedsters, bonita and false albacore zipping thru our lives in a blink, we grin for days. The former, tasty and the latter tasteless. Phooey" And Summer Flounder aka "Fluke." No one I know catches and releases Fluke. Lip smacking yummy good. Sea Bass and Cod, double yummy. Flounder. Tastee, but scarce. A 2 fish limit isn't much of an incentive. (But the Quincy, MA/Boston Harba' flounder are back) There are six pack charter boats now instead of the shallow head boats that hauled thousands of us NY and NJ fish hounds to Quincy to load up of those fat flatties. I had a FDNY neighbor who put together firemen, father and son trips to Quincy for flounder. If he had a last minute cancellation,I and one or both of my sons would climb on the bus with a great crowd of fathers and sons. Kids who never fished before, rode back down the Connecticut Turnpike hard core flounder fishermen.

 

They talked about Chestertown hooks and tipping them with corn kernels. Talk knowingly about letting the flounder hit three times and then hooking them and getting them in the boat fast, so the hook could go back for another. Both my sons, :bigeyes:one 9 and one 11, bragging to their school mates that they had been to Quincy for flounder fishing and how good the day was and how tasty the fish were.They never said no, when I'd ask "Quincy?".

 

I have an old, old friend who has put together a double boat charter for 12 guys from upstate NY who as city kids made the trip to Quincy. They will be doing it in June. I asked Charley to keep an eye out for boat launches near Boston Harbor, when I can run my dory up and collect a limit of those fat and large flatties while I'm on the cape. Middle of the week, drizzley day, no wind Perfect? A flat of blood worms and a light tipped rod. Priceless!

 

Filet of flounder Colber'. Mmmmmm[h! Good! dusted with flour, painted with beaten egg and rolled in Progresso Italian bread crumbs and saute' till light brown in what the rench refer to as "burnt buttuer" Pass the Savingion Blanc of a nice Vinho Verde lik Avalada. Be still my heart.

 

 

:bigeyes::wave:

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Read post #2 :)

 

Or possibly #3, If OP is anything like me that is more than enough. Nothing is written in stone and books, etc can only get you so far. Get your hands dirty.

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RJ, a ferry ride to the passaic for thousands of bass sounds like a lot but if they had the ability and foresight to do it in 1870 they could and should do it now. Great idea! I was shocked when I read that they were transplanting fish that long ago.

At what point do they start looking in other rivers to see if stripers are spawning in them. Are scientific netting areas already set in these waters or do they wait until they receive reports from fishermen?

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