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basschazerRP

Basic Kayak help needed

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Hi Guys,

Let me just start out by saying I don't know a thing about kayaking accept a little info I've read here lately. I'm brainstorming for the 2003 fall season and the WHEELS ARE TURNIN .

 

There's a fishing spot that I'd like to get to and its about 150 yards off shore. The water is about 6 feet deep in this area. I would be carrying 1 surf rod and a plug bag back and forth ( and 1 40 pounder per trip )

sorry I was dreaming . A kayak seems to be a option to me. Am I on the right track ?

How long of one might I need ? How much do they weight ?

 

I've read about wet suits / dry suits . Sit in kayaks and sit on kayaks . Please help me with my confused state. Thanks

 

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Basschazer

You will like it so much that you will be finding alot of spots like that.Maybe they will all have 40 pders in them.

 

Anyway I like a SOT for a couple of reasons.The main one is getting in\\out.Also you can get back on one much easier than a sink filled with water if you have a mishap.

 

There is a ton of info here in older threads.

 

Wilderness Syatems Kayaks & Cobra Kayaks seem to be the 2 most used brands on this site.There is another Fishing Kayak coming out very soon that should be a great yak.Keep watching for that one.

 

JoeV

 

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Always Wishin I Was Yak Fishin

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Bernie Its supposed to be inbetween the Tarpon 160 and 120.Or at least that was the goal when Jon and I were discussing it .So figure around $750 or so.Maybe less wo a rudder a little more with it.With the features of this boat it should be a big hit even if it costs tha same as the Tarpon 160

 

JoeV

 

 

 

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Always Wishin I Was Yak Fishin

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Can't believe nobody mentioned the #1 choice of yakfishers... the Ocean Kayak Scupper Pro. Tracks well, can handle surf for launching/landing, plenty of deckspace, reasonably stabile, fast, etc. etc.

 

A classic, strong, proven design. Or if you want something a bit smaller, more surfable...the Scrambler XT, also used by LOTS of yakkers for fishin.

 

Best news: there are plenty of good used ones. For example I got my Pro for $350 incl. paddle, and am picking up an XT for $150 tomorrow.

 

Point: look around, you WILL find a good used one (cause Ocean Kayak sold of ton of these) at a good price...you'll probably like it, but if you don't you can sell it easily for what you paid. And you won't be afraid to modify it (like you would with a new one).

 

The Tarpon 120 is great for it's size. The rumoured 140 will be great too, but $$$$$. And survey says....Scupper Pro.

 

Honest.

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Actually Soc the survey is more likely to say that Ocean Kayaks are capable certainly, but heavy. Most of these things are transported on car or SUV roofs and after four or five hours on the water most of us would rather be hoisting less than more.

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What is considered heavy?

 

I'm comfortable with 40-50 lbs but it depends on the length.

My sea yak is 16' and about 60 lbs.Combing digs deep into my shoulder and not fun

WW boat about 40lbs.9' long and I can carry it a long time

rec yak is 12' and about 50lbs.Again the combing digging into my flesh keeps the body in pain.

 

These are all sit insides so there is plenty of cockpit opening to get it lifted and carried.

A sit on? never carried/loaded or unloaded one so am not sure of the bulkiness of them.

 

Lastly................all my yaks are featherweights com[pared to the canoe!!!!

16' and 85lbs of pure portage hellsmile.gif

But man is she sweet to paddle and pole.

Plenty of leg room and room for the cooler thumbuprt.gif

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All the dimensions count. Controlling a short yak is easier than a long one of the same weight. It's also a matter of hieght. Lifting a sixteen foot yak up on to a tall SUV could be one hell of a chore if you're vertically challenged. A pickup truck could be an answer here. As a general rule 60 pounds is probably the upside limit for all but the tallest and strongest of us for roof top carrying. A buddy has an Old Town Discovery 16'6" that comes in at 84 pounds. It's a two man job to put it on the roof of his Yukon.

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Guys, Ive been reading your posts and trying to learn a little about this subject. I've looked at kfs and read some info and looked at some cabra's .

 

I'm 5' 7" and 175 lbs and currently drive a explorer. Would a 11' 3" Explorer fit in my truck with the back hatch open. I'd rather not play around with putting it on top of the truck if I didn't need to. The Explorer is listed at 40 lbs. that seems rather liftable if I need to get it on top of the truck.

 

Do any of you guys use this model or have any input on it ?

 

How likely would it be to find a used one at a good price ?

 

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[This message has been edited by JonS (edited 01-13-2003).]

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They're all heavy with 40 lb bass in them. Basschazer just needs someone like me to help him get the boat to his spot. wink.gif

Sounds like you got a favorite rock so SOT's would be the ticket, easier in/out than SINKs. Also if it's in a nice piece of surf SOT's are safer to fall out of. FWIW, I can put 9-10 ft rigged rods inside the 16 ft Tarpon, probably longer, where they get a lot less trashed by the water/sand launching. Shorter boats are easier in surf and they weigh less but you'd have to break down rods or lash them on deck. Moderately cold, like 50 degree water and air, you can wear a wetsuit, colder you should make some arrangements to stay dry. SOT, wetsuit, rods in the Tarpon hatch, you can crash and burn all day. Most of these yaks are 50-70 lbs rigged, a few are lighter and shorter and may serve you well if that's important.

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For what its worth I'll add this:

The first few times you handle a kayak..............any kayak............it feels awkward.I'm talking about getting on/off...in/out of the vehicle and to the water.

but soon you get the feel for ir and it gets to be fairly easy.

That 50 lbs of moulded plastic that broke your butt at the beginning gets to be much easier to manuever around.

 

Roof racks are the way to go.Trying to fit a kayak inside your truckbed etc can be done...............but racks are easier and safer.

My setup has a set of rollers at the rear and saddles at the front.Makes getting it on and off my truck very easy.

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Brief follow up bout the Ocean Kayaks... esp. Pro and Scrambler XT. The Pro is 55 lb., Scrambler in the 40's. I have 3 bad discs in my back, can't lift much of anything.

 

I learned how to slide my Pro up onto simple foam blocks; others lift it up one end, then the other. Now I lift it directly up and don't bother with sliding it.

 

Point: once you discover the balance point, all the awkwardness goes away. It's easy to load/unload.

 

As far a transport... if you can't park near the sand or water, there are a ton of inexpensive wheel carts (or make your own like I did for $23) and you can pull it behind you for a mile if you want... balanced, no sweat.

 

The Ocean Kayaks weigh no more or less than the other sit-on-tops which is your FIRST choice for fishing.

 

As far as an 11 footer, hope you don't have far to go. Once you own a SOT you'll want to go farther and more often than you thought. At which point you'll kick yourself for getting a "shorter, lighter yak".

 

To get anywhere, you need at LEAST 14 feet of yak. And not much wider than 28 inches either. Again...the Scupper Pro.

 

BTW...weight is relative. Yak weight is meaningless for a fisherman. It weighs bout 50 lb., but add you (say 180 lb.), gear, anchor, livewell, rod/reel, cooler, fishfinder, battery, etc. etc.... you'll be pushing 275 to 300 lbs or more. More if you camp.

 

Scupper Pro will carry bout 400, so you are nowhere near it's limit, so it rides right, handles well.

 

Now as for the smaller yaks, the only reason I'd consider say the Scrambler would be if I had to deal with lots of serious surf, and wanted to play in the surf too.

 

Look, I've been in the Tarpon 120, the Necky Cruiser, Spike and Dolphin. Tarpon 16 too.

 

When you get into the shorter yaks...the comments I have heard are "tracks great and it's fast...for a 12 footer". Always qualified. Bottom line: an 11 or 12 is NOT 15 or 16. It's gonna be slower, not hold as much, etc. Just the way it is. Sure they'll handle better if you like to surf.

 

But if you like to fish... if you want to explore more places, get farther, quicker, faster, more comfortably, carrying more, handling better loaded, etc., you WILL appreciate more boat. Honest.

 

Don't take my word for it. The Scupper Pro is used by more yakfishers than the others combined.

 

My two cents. SOT's (and the Pro) dominate fishing for a reason. And they hold their value so if you buy a good used one you'll get your money back if you don't like it. But of course YMMV.

 

Last 2 cents: highly recommend that you either rent or borrow and try as many yaks as you can. A 10 minute paddle in the canal behind the dealership tells you NOTHING bout whether you will really like the yak. Take it where you are gonna fish. Paddle around for half a day. Switch yaks, A/B 'em if possible.

 

Truth is you probl. won't know whether you really like the yak until you own it for awhile. Your second yak will be a lot better choice once you have your own experiences on the water under real conditions.

 

In my case, the Tarpon 120 and 16 knocked my socks off, and sure tested better than the Pro in the canal behind the dealership.

But not under the real conditions I face in the Atlantic, with the gear I carry, etc. I now know that the 120 wouldn't have cut it, and the 16, though very fast and tourable was not the combination of touring, turning and stability that the Pro offers (not to mention a tankwell, HUGE front hatch, LOTS of deckspace, etc., etc.).

 

Summary: Go for at least 14 feet (they all are easy to load/launch), don't worry bout the weight as much as unused carrying capacity, buy used, buy popular and proven.

 

The envelope please...

 

 

 

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That's why the Fisherman is being built. We need more fish friendly kayaks. wink.gif The price for this 14'er will be $699 and there will be a rudder option. Great accessible storage and a tankwell too.

 

As to shorter yaks currently on the market that fish well that I'm familar with they're the OK Scramblers and Drifter, Cobra Explorer, Fish 'n dive and Navigator, and the Tarpon 120. If I were going to buy a yak in this class it would hands down be the Tarpon 120. Emotion, the company that's building the Fisherman is also going to have a model very similar to the Cobra Explorer/Navigator. Its going to be called the Excelerator (not sure on spelling) and it will be the app. length of the Explorer but with an extra set of leg rungs for longer legs. The hull is designed quieter with better handles fron and rear and side handles too. It should be at the Somerset Fly Show along with the Fisherman.

 

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JonS@****stuff.com

 

[This message has been edited by JonS (edited 01-13-2003).]

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