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HardyG

The Big Question

9 posts in this topic

I don't know if it will for you but it has for me. wink.gif

 

As a surf fisherman I've had way too many fishless days, too many. I can count on one hand how many fishless kayak fishing trips in over 100 days from the yak I've had. Of these 3 were not days when I would have gone fishing if it were my choice. Only 1 day was fishless for me this year and the 5-10 NW on Raritan Bay turned out to be 15-25. Joey managed a fish and it was so miserable that Frick won't return to the Bay to fish.

 

[This message has been edited by JonS (edited 01-18-2002).]

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There is NO doubt in my mind that a kayak will indeed help you catch more fish. I can distinctly think of Three times off of the top of my head I wouldn't have caught the fish I did without the kayak. Bluefishing off of Keyport, trout fishing in Sheppard's Lake and one large trout in the Manasquan River. Without the kayak, no way I catch those fish.

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RichG There was a thread a while back about the other benefits of fishing from a yak.I think it will help ya get into mo fish vs shore fishing.It will also open up many areas to ya that were off limits before.Get one you wont regret it.Ther are alot of yakkers near ya.So you will have guys to hookup with.

joev

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Rich,

I'm not sure what kind of fishing you do but I am sure your fish catching potential will GREATLY increase!

 

I have done a lot of freshwater fishing from two boats I formerly owned and on shore. Comparing bank fishing to fishing in the boats I might as well play golf.

 

The one boat finally died this past sping. It has one too many leaks in it now. It is/was a 10' Jon boat I bought for $40.00 when I was 16. It is/was a not so stable craft...and the aluminum is VERY thin. The floor actually split last year so I'm forced to retire her. I never spent a better $40 in my life.

 

I took it everywhere. I caught TONS of bass, pike, smallies, panfish, weakies, even kingfish in that darn thing. All fish I NEVER would have caught from the bank.

 

I also had a bigger 14' v-bottom aluminum boat with fishfinder, outboard..etc. I always caught more fish in the little boat. It was quiet and I enjoyed the little 10'r more. I could throw it in the back of the truck and go. I could launch anywhere I could carry it to water.

 

Not so with Mr. trailer boat. It always seemed like a hassle...whether I was towing it...thinking "what if I get a flat?" Oh...and having someone else want to drive when the trailer was hooked up...."ok, let me unhook the trailer" Uggg.

 

I just got a Cobra Explorer a few weeks ago. I'm thinking I may still want a new metal boat with the trolling motor, etc. But I used to like to go "simple" with the j-boat and just take a paddle in local lakes but it was a bear to paddle, unlike a kayak. Another thing I like about the kayak is the dry storage, and the fact that unlike my j-boat..I don't have to worry about going down with the ship. If ya sat in that thing in the water you'd know what I mean. No floatation, no dry storage.

 

I took it to a marina I worked at during the summer in Fortescue and would paddle it out and fish 150 yards off the beach. That's all the further ya had to go! And when playing around in the waves I found out just how FAST she would sink.

 

The possibilites I see with this kayak are what made me want one in the first place.

The sit-on-tops allow you to even penetrate the surf. I don't drive on the beach but if I did I'd have a hard time not bringing it with me everytime I did. The crowd issues you see on the bank / on the beach become less and less of an issue when you have a small craft to float around in.

 

It's like a big pair of floating waders with BIG pockets. And you are not limited to depth..go where you want.

 

Of course...it's no 21' center console either. But a kayak can go where those boats can't and that's where I'd rather fish in the first place. Even if I only used mine to get from one place to the other...get out and wade flats, etc..I'd rather paddle there than walk there..all that mud and ****. Yuck! With the explorer and it's hatches I can pick the thing up and walk to the water and launch. One maybe two trips from truck to water. I like that! The hatches fit most everything inside the kayak. Depends on how much ya take with you I suppose.

 

I never used the bigger boat in the salt. I didn't trust the sometimes hard to start outboard. It was too big to row and the little boat was just plain unstable ESPECIALLY with any waves or wakes involved. With the kayak I have a small, easy to transport boat with plenty of storage and simple easy *cheap* propulsion. It's sea worthy enough for me and the backbay waters I am longing to exploit.

 

I've not fished from my kayak yet, but I do know the benefits from other related experiences. I can't wait to get started!

 

 

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Come on Tax Refund! I'm doin it! My Ranger bass boat has been good to me, and as I said in another thread, it's the meanest flats boat you could imagine. When the bass are chasing bunker in the bay, it's one of the fastest boats out there, and the electric motor lets you sneak up on breaking fish, while other boats using main engines put them down. The problem, the thing needs more maintenance than the hottest hottie. It eats money like one, too. A yak seems clean and simple. The Hardyman....the Yakmeister....the Yakarama....biggrin.gif

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Well made points above. Its amazing that for the cost of a nice surf rod and reel (and where not talking top of the line) one can have a kayak ready to fish. I fished from a float tube for 20 years before I discovered yak fishing. I used my tube alot. Since getting into yak fishing I've used the tube once. Early in the season was especially tough on the tube and weedy and shallow areas were especially tough. The kayak is great in both, expecially in the shallows. I'm always amazed when I fish water less than a foot deep. I do this a lot in freshwater. Since I'm so low the fish can't see me but I can detect their presence. Sometimes its a subtle wake, a shadow or I actually see them. Due to my low angle and quietness, the fish don't know that I'm there. I especially love these types of places that the yak allows me to fish and how close to the environment I get. Its a great experience.

 

There's a river in PA that floats through a remote canyon. I've hiked it a few times and its got a great population of trout and smallies. I've had some great experiences there. There's one particular stretch where I've seen some huge fish. We're talking smallies in the 5# range and browns a few pounds heavier. These fish hang in an area where you can't reach them with a cast from the other shore and from the shore where you can see them the overhanging brush prevents casting. Great place to observe though. A kayak positioned either well above or below and quietly anchored should be just the ticket.

 

DougC - look into making caddy or purchasing one. This way you can wheel the kayak and all you gear quite some distance and not have to make more than one trip. There are applications where this is a great way to go.

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