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JimW

Perception Napali

15 posts in this topic

TM,

 

Skinnier hulls with (generally) lower initial stability and good secondary stability are ideal for big water (I assume this is what you mean by "out front"). A boat that's too wide, and thus generally will have high initial stability, will roll too much in the waves. Keep the aircraft carriers in the back bays and rely on thousands of years of R&D for the hull forms you want "out front."

 

Chris

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I think it looks cool, but there's too much stuff on it you don't need. That makes it unnecessarily pricey. I'm dying to try one out

 

Your problem with the skinny beam (although 26" is similar to the Scupper Pro TW) are the swells that make you uneasy outside the breakers. That's where all the TW people learn to swim.

 

Wide beams are actually quite popular out on the West coast where the really big waves are. Cobra F/D, Malibu IIs, and Swings are all wide boats that are standards out there. As long as you're not sideways into the wave, you actually benefit from the beam. And if you're sideways in the wave you're totally done anyway (unless you do a real good bracing stroke)

 

The length usually makes for a lame surfing boat too (unless you're into pole vaulting ... pretty cool until you hit the sand). Length is good when your punching out thru the wave, but this is not likely a surf zone play boat. Most of the play boats are in fact relatively wide for their length and much shorter.

 

If you want to learn about the mean streets of the surf zone, go to a West Coast board. We're just a bunch of lightweights with foolish ideas to those folks.

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The guys out west are definately the experts in the surf. For the most part you can't fish if you don't go out through the surf. The only time that they get relief is when they fish Baja (on the cortez side). We are very fortunate with the diversity we have here. There's so much fishing for those who don't wish to deal with waves. I love fishing the ocean as I do all the other envirionments that we have.

 

The Nap does look nice.

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S-2,

What's the expensive add on stuff you you referred to? I'm guessing seat gets replaced first, but I was thinking most of the other items don't add up to much, you have me wondering.

Jim

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I must say that I am totally on line with Santiago's conclusions. My friends with the skinnier hulls are not happy when trying to fish out front in any type of decent chop or swell. (out front meaning just past the breakers) They are just plain getting dumped when a swell sneaks up on them. "not good for confidence"

 

As far as the "Surf Zone", My own excursions have taught me some quick lessons. "Get past it as fast as possible", and you will be in good shape. Get a good feel for the wave timing, keep your nose straight, and paddle hard until your out of the zone.

 

For me, a wider hull is actually more forgiving, (with a straight nose of course) when paddling my arms off and trying to break trough a set before it breaks down on my head. Believe me, I have had my _ss handed to me, and my boat crack be in the head on numerous experimental beach launches. I have tried a skinny hull, "I won't even go there, by giving you my idea of skinny", I don't feel like getting bashed by the board! The skinny hull is less forgiving when trying to jet propel yourself trough the danger zone.

 

As far as getting turned sideways, once again,"this is my opinion", if this is happening, you probably should be paddling harder. Once your sideways in a rough zone, your done......Any hull design will not make a difference. Now its time to bail while also trying to preserve your gear....

 

It's almost surf attack time again....Terry

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Hi Jon, I will be at OBX from 4/27 till 5/4.

This is our annual group trip. I will probably be with a group of 15 or 16 this year. Fathers, friends, etc..... This is the 12th year we have had our weekly spring trip. Always a blast, however there is only one other kayaker in the group. If anyone else is down at that time, let me know. We can meet and go search out some channels and bars for the Reds. Terry

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S-2,

What's the expensive add on stuff you you referred to? I'm guessing seat gets replaced first, but I was thinking most of the other items don't add up to much, you have me wondering.

Jim

 

Anytime a manufacturer adds things like deck rigging, padding in the seat, back straps, etc., the price gets jacked up above and beyond the cost of the parts. Hatches and pad eyes are necessary additions so they don't count (although if you add your own you save a bit also).

 

Many times it's better to add your own anyway. Lots of hatches are poorly sealed and pop rivets leak terribly in the surf zone.

 

I've replaced almost all the rivets in my Sea Dart with stainless steel screws. I also had to remove and seal all the hatches to keep the water out.

 

To be fair, Perception makes the best detailed, most water tight, kayaks I've ever used. I've never had to refit anything I bought from them.

 

Santiago

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Terry I'd love to get down there but with the fling just a few days after I can't take that much time. To much to do. Let's definately do a fall/winter fling though.

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