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blusteel

Tying Saltwater Flies

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               Hello to Everyone



 



      I am new to fly tying. Quick question .headscratch.gif Can you tie a fly on a circle hook?.                                                                            



 



 If so how effective is it ? Does it swim sideways? Does it make it easyer to set the hook?



            



 



                                                                                                  Thank you



 



 



             P.S Can use all the help I can get .


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Since I see a yak on the truck a circle hook is a good deal for fly tying because if you troll a fly it's self hooking. I do not like circle hooks, I like to strip strike and be a happy camper. No barbs makes hook removal easy. If you want to tye on a circle hook it's swim just fine.....besides sideways means injured fish or dying dinner. The Fly BST just had some good deal on flys....FliesNPlugs had a super offer. Good luck.

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For me having line in hand, feeling the take, setting the hook is a large percentage of the overall enjoyment of flyfishing.  Principles of the circle hook kind of go in the other direction. 


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blusteel, welcome on board. The best place to get fly tying advice is the Fly Tying Forum. just go to the fly tying forum on the SOL list of Forums. I'm sure there are guys on it who tye circle hooks.

 

 

Mike, When circle hooks are inhaled and the fish turns away after the take the leader or line will exit the fish's mouth at the corner of its jaw that is closest to the angler. The circle hook will slide up from the stomach without digging into any internal flesh and when it reaches the corner of the jaw it will automatically rotate around the corner of the mouth and dig into the grisle there and the fish hooks itself, without any internal damages. The jaw corner also allows for an easy un hook and release of the fish.

 

More bait fishers should use circle hooks if they intend to catch and release the fish.

 

I have seen circle hooks on crab flies, and believe they will work well in bottom feeding striped bass who are targeting grabs, baby flounder and sand eels at rest.

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   lg_smile.gif



         Yes I 'll be fishing off the yak .I like the idea of the trolling the fly. I normaly kill the barb on



 



  the hooks for a simpler release. This is a fly I tied(new born)



1000

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Rj

 

I know all this crap. :D But I can't but once recall when a Stripers swallowed a fly of mine down to its gut. What you describe is what in theory happens with a circle hook with bait on it and I guess same would be true if a Striper did take hook right down.. Never had them hooked further down than a short way down the throat using std J hooks. Most are lip hooked.

 

I don't do mind numbing trolling too young to get into that lark.:)

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Blusteel, in Bob Clousers book, "Clousers Flies" he mentions using circle hooks with a high success rate while fishing for Tarpon. That type of hook can have it's uses, and I agree with saltyh2ofly it may be ideal for trolling. I've tied on circles some, but like others have said, for Stripers it's not my favorite style. Since you're new to tying, I suggest you give them a try & tie similar flies on J hooks and compare for yourself. We all may use similar fly types, but might be fishing them in different conditions & situations, so one type of hook may be better than another. Just as an example, I know some guys here like to swing flies in the current, while others will spend more time stripping them. A circle hook might be a good choice where the fly is dead drifted & swung in the current, while the J hook is a better choice for those strip retrieves. It's all about applying the technique as to which style of hook would be a better choice.

 

One observation about your fly. You may have created a problem with the placement of the eyes, particularly if you intend to add epoxy or other material around those eyes. Notice that the gap between the bottom of the eyes & the point of the hook is less than the original gap between the hook point & shank.

This might decrease your hook up ratio when using that circle hook. Anytime you tie a fly, be aware of how much you reduce the hook gap with the addition of materials. Too much of a reduction in the gap will limit the hooks ability to grab, and with a circle hook, being that the point is aimed at the shank, too little gap may be a big problem. It's like using a hook that is much too small and those eyes may even deflect the hook away from the corner of the mouth.

 

If you're going to add over sized eyes then use a larger size hook, or stick with a J hook. However, the issue of reducing the gap still applies with J hooks.

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Rj

 

I know all this crap. :D But I can't but once recall when a Stripers swallowed a fly of mine down to its gut. What you describe is what in theory happens with a circle hook with bait on it and I guess same would be true if a Striper did take hook right down.. Never had them hooked further down than a short way down the throat using std J hooks. Most are lip hooked.

 

I don't do mind numbing trolling too young to get into that lark.:)

 

Never had it happen on schoolie sized bass. I have had it happen a few times on larger bass and a decent number of fluke that swallowed the fly far enough down that the odds of it living were slim if I left it in and if I removed it I know that fish would die. In those cases I usually just harvest the fish. That said, the vast majority of fish I catch end up with a perfect set in the corner or top lip with the occasional fish hooked in the roof of the mouth using J hooks on the fly.

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              lg_smile.gifHi Tidewaterfly



 



                            Thanks for that bit of information. I'll keep in mind the hook gap .



    



    I see what you mean . The gap ? headscratch.gif Guess I'll have to buy a book on tying!!!


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Yes, the gap or gape. The space between the hook point & the hook shank. Reduce it too much it's like using a much smaller hook, which is not usually in your best interest for hooking fish.

 

Do a web search for "fishing hook terminology", or go to Mustads website & look for the anatomy of a hook. That will give you the terms. Doesn't matter the brand.

 

Most fly tying terminology can be found on the web.

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               Hello to Everyone

 

      I am new to fly tying. Quick question .:huh: Can you tie a fly on a circle hook?.                                                                            

 

 If so how effective is it ? Does it swim sideways? Does it make it easyer to set the hook?

            

 

                                                                                                  Thank you

 

 

             P.S Can use all the help I can get .

 

Yes, you can certainly tie a fly on a circle, and it will track the same as a J-hook. Circles are all I use for albacore and bluefish flies, and they out-perform J-hooks by a mile. Fish will hook themselves on the strike, and once they're on, they're on. Jim's point about keeping the hook gap clear is well taken - it's doubly important on circle hooks. An offset circle (like Owner Mutu Lights) will swim slightly tilted, which makes zero difference to the fish, but I usually use non-offsets. Mustad C71SS hooks are non-offset and excellent for fly tying. Be sure to de-barb all circles - if you hook yourself with a barbed circle, it's a guaranteed trip to the ER. There are a few species that are tough to take on circles under certain conditions, but for fast-moving species, they're unbeatable. I haven't tied an albacore fly on a J-hook in 15 years, and excluding breakoffs, my hookup/landing rate is well over 90%.

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