Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
bugbouy04103

New to surf casting

Rate this topic

17 posts in this topic


Today I picked up what I consider a surf rod out at Dicks by the mall. I didn't spend a ton of money on it and will post the specs of it tomorrow where as the rod is in my car right now and I don't feel like going back out again to get it.



 



I guess what I am looking for is maybe someone who would be willing to educate me a bit more on how to surf cast. I have fished from boats, docks, jettys and various other places using shorter rods (less than 8 feet) but have never tried using a larger set up. I figured that this year would be a great time to learn something new in the world of fishing and am looking for a bit of a mentor.



 



I realize that surf casting has a totally different set of skills and knowledge needed but am rather eager to learn to fish a new style. Anyone who would be willing to help, either here or more preferably face to face... even if its down on the portland waterfront would be greatly aprecaited.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are some videos on youtube on this subject. The trick is to kind of slowly and smoothly heave it out there and let the rod do the work. Be careful not to let your finger off the line too soon and you'll get the whole timing thing down. If you are like me, you probably bought a rod that is too heavy at first, but don't worry, it'll work just fine after a bit of practice. Go slow at first, and don't try to hit Europe on your first try. Also some great books on the subject around. Welcome to a great addiction. Nothing like fighting a good fish in the surf. Practice, practice, and practice till you get it right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In most situations in Maine surf casting, super long casts aren't required as the fish are in the wash or just outside it. Worry about finding the right lures and the correct presentation first, casting distance second. If you can cast your lure out 25 yards, and you are using the right lure and retrieving it correctly, you will catch probably 90% of the fish available to a surfcaster in Maine. There are certainly situations where it is great to be able to cast 100 yards, but that is rarely necessary around here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No need for a 15' rod anywhere in Maine, or anywhere else that I know of. I use rods from 7 to 11' depending on the situation. IMO, if you're just getting into surf fishing, get a good quality 8' rod like a st croix premier or mojo surf, and you will be all set for most situations. Don't bother buying a rod over 8' unless you can afford a good quality rod which will usually be $200-300+. Big cheap rods tend to be too heavy and poorly balanced, and in my experience do more harm than good. A cheaper rod may be ok for chunking, but not for plug fishing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fished a 10 foot tsunami airwave for the past two years plugs only and big heavy ones ~ 2.5 to 3.5 ounces. All rods run the potential to snap. But Ive had no problem personally and they do have a five year warranty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

Originally Posted by TwoLightsKid View Post

In most situations in Maine surf casting, super long casts aren't required as the fish are in the wash or just outside it. Worry about finding the right lures and the correct presentation first, casting distance second. If you can cast your lure out 25 yards, and you are using the right lure and retrieving it correctly, you will catch probably 90% of the fish available to a surfcaster in Maine. There are certainly situations where it is great to be able to cast 100 yards, but that is rarely necessary around here.



x2 on this one...if I had a nickle for every time I've said this to someone. I do the majority of my fishing at night from shore at low tide, and while you will need to get out a little further at dead low, you still don't need to be anywhere near as far as people will have you believe. At dead low tide the first 10 yards (in OOB any way, this will vary beach to beach) is ankle deep, get a pair of waders, walk out up to your knees and lob your bait or plug another 20 yards. Work on being able to cast accurately to a spot even 10-20-30 yds offshore and practice until you can do it consistently without even thinking about it and THEN increase your distance. A quick look at my fishing log tells me that I have caught just as many fish in close as I have casting out to infinity and beyond. If plug fishing 7-8' should be all you need to get started and if you're chucking bait, 10-11' is fine. I wouldn't reccomend a Wally World rod/reel, but hell, even that will get ya started and catch fish before you think of upgrading. Definitely recommend doing a Google search as I know there are an abundance of videos specifically dedicated to the 'casting' aspect of surf casting. And if you're ever around the Old Orchard area this summer/fall I'd be more than happy to show ya the ropes of floating worms, just give a shout.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, a bit much but honestly if it isIall you've got and includes a balanced reel it definitely beats a snoopy pole.

 

I read one of the surf fishing "bibles" (Zeno Hromin's book maybe?) a while back that talks about the need to cast horizontally rather than vertically. It stressed fishing the wash closest to shore, where the contours are. This is where the baitfish hang, and where the stripers come in to feed. It was a radical departure from the way I had fished in a previous life, and it took me a while to wrap my head around. The thing that struck me was the statement that a striper can twitch its tail a couple of times and be 50 - 75 yards away. I regrouped and learned cast "across" rather than "out" and have had better results. This can be further proven by the fly casters around here like Mainiac that consistently catch good fish in relatively shallow waters close to shore. I might still heave some bait out and let it works its way around in the tide, particularly if I'm fishing with some guys that are even more of a novice than I consider myself. We set the longer rod in a sand spike and wait. But when I'm by myself or at least with more experienced fishermen, I'm more apt to work plugs and tins horizontally through the foam.

 

Damn, now I'm gonna be dreaming about the surf.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I guess I will try the behemoth out with chunks and bring my bass rod along for plugging. If you happen to see me out on the beach with my telephone pole, please try to keep the pointing and snickering to a minimum. smile.gif



 



Is there anything to throw bait to in the surf before May, or should I stick with trout and landlocked salmon on ultralight gear from the banks of Wini for now?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don't bother buying a rod over 8' unless you can afford a good quality rod which will usually be $200-300+.
Yeah, don't quite agree with that statement, there are plenty of good quality rods out there for much less than that.

I typically like to use different sized rods for different situations. 7' to 7' 6" back bays, relatively calm Ocean front, 8' when the surf is a bit rough, 9' and maybe even a 10' when the surf is large. Is that set in stone?...No

I've had day's, relatively calm, where the 9' or even 10' rod came in handy to throw plugs our far, to reach the fish that just to happened to be hanging out at the outer bar, without those rod's, I would not be able to reach them with something smaller.

When you go out, take the 15', put a large Mac head on there, use a sliding rig, and heave it as far out as you can, set your sand spike, place rod in spike, set your drag, and wait. Change bait frequently. While your waiting, take your smaller rod, and plug the shoreline nearby for fish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Thanks for all the advice. I have a lot to think about and even more to learn. I think I might just go down to the waterfront and practice throwing the line with the new pole and get a real feel for it.



 



I am also wondering, does a 10' rod have any other uses for salt water other than being crotch deep in the surf? I mean is there a practical use from boats, jettys and the like?

 


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got time I'll throw my .02 in. I can't spend a lot on rods and reels. $200 rod is out of my range, especially if I want to get a couple. I like the penn battle reels, so far couple of years and no problems. I have a small boat and like the 7' to 7'6" rods. I use the same rods for striper/blues and bass/pike. They are heavy for the fw but work, I throw big plugs and frogs in the weeds so I like the 40# braid. Granted when i get a 2# bass there is really no fight but I'm hoping for the 4# + and then another 6#+ of grass and weeds.

 

Anyways I get double duty out of my stuff. I also take the same reel on my 7' rod and put it on a 9' for shore fishing. Even down the canal. It's a little lite but a nice change wt. wise. I won't use it if it's kind of crowded, don't want to bother anybody. When schoolies or small fish around it is a lot of fun.

 

There ya go. Scott

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.