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Barramundi

Greetings from Oz !

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 Hi all , this is a great site - I've been a lurker for some time , but finally joined up today . Although I live in Australia and many species are different , I am an avid land- based fisho and particularly enjoy surf fishing . I am gobsmacked to learn that huge albacore can be found in shallow beach water over there - here they are a very deep sea species only , miles from the shore . Nevertheless , quite a few of your species can be found here , although many have different names . I really like fishing for fast fish from ocean surf rock headlands ; and here one may encounter various tunas , Spanish and other mackerals , bonito , tailor [ I think you guys call them " bluefish " ] , etc .  .    Also , I enjoy chasing [ but with only occasional success ] Mulloway [ Argyrosomus hololepotus , aka Sciaena antarctica - we call them " Jewfish "  ] ,  and Snapper [ Chrysophrys auratus ] . I believe members of these genus occur worldwide , but hav'nt read of you guys fishing for them ... Here the Mulloway [ Jew ] is much sought after , and probably the biggest bruiser within reach of the shoe angler .    . Up north in the tropics conditions , climate and species change radically , and shore fishing can be risky , unless from a wharf or boat - crocodiles are a constant threat north of about Latitude 26 , and most anglers inshore chase Barramundi from the relative safety [?? ] of a dinghy . [ barra are closely related to Nile perch ] .                                                                                                                       .    Anyway , I just wanted to say " hello " , and ask a few questions elsewhere here  . ... regards .                                                                                                                          .     


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Sorry , no pics - a digtital camera is on the wish list ..... I use ABU bait casters for tossing lures in estuaries and around the rocks - a 6500 C3 and an old red 7000 [ bush type , not ball bearing ] that is about 20 years old and still works like new ; the only mod is a new drag recently ..... For the surf and beaches I've been using Spinfishers [ 750 , and an 850 about 5 years ago ] .... Today I received a mail - order Calcutta that I have not yet used , or even put line on .... Also , atm Penn reels are being cleared out in Oz at discount - I could'nt pass up a Slammer LL 560 for $ 75 inc freight , and ordered one today .... Amazing prices atm in Oz for Spinfisher SSM s and Slammers - up to $95- 99 for the big 950 and 1050s .... As for rods , a Fenwick baitcaster with cork grips [ found s/h in a pawn shop about 10 years ago ] is so good I gave the previous ugly stik bc to a nephew .... Most of my other rods are glass , although I am now sold on graphite and changing over .... Waiting for an 8' locally made " live fibre " *  8 - 10 kg for the CT 700 that arrived today ...... I have the old 7000C on an Ugly Stik  " Gut Butt " DHB 1101 , but it feels like casting with a broom stick , so I mainly use that for baiting ; thinking about replacing it with a Daiwa " Generation Black Beefstik " - hoping it may feel nicer , but the Ugly Stik certainly is a tough item ...... All my beach rods are 2 - piece local glass items , 12 - 14 ' , but would like to upgrade to carbon ..... For the past year or so  I have been using a Shimano Revolution T - curve 9 ' 6 - 10 kg , with an old 750 SS , for rock spinning , and I am very happy with it ..... None of my rods are expensive top - range items , more like mid - range - mid priced stuff .... I am not a fan of 2 - piece rods , and everything up 10 '  is one piece . I have 2 old local brand glass 2 - piece surf / beach rods that have served well , but again would like to upgrade to carbon one day ..... Apart from an accident with a car door , I have never had a rod break when fishing [ hoping my current and future carbon rods will be as tough ] , and only had a couple of guide failures , probably due to non - fishing knocks .... In my experience , I suspect that maintenance and care are the key to tackle longevity , and I look after my gear as best as I am able ...Also , Fin Nor Affinity threadlines can be purchased for $  99 -  atm , and the Offshore range  for $99 - $ 149 ; and I am very tempted ......To date I have never used a braid line , but i am hearing good things about braids for lure spinning .....


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Hi Barramundi from Scotland!! Global or what :D

 

I visit and fish in the States each summer.

 

We get a lot of your tv progs - Rex Hunt, Steve Starling, Bushy and the Ifish boys to name a few. Your shore fishing, like the States, is far better than we have here.........not to mention the weather!

 

Phil

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Welcome. Crocs are an issue where I live also, Costa Rica, but I think ours are less aggressive then yours.been a few years since I heard of anyone getting eaten. Good Luck


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Crocs are scary , and really sleazy - once I was spinning in a rocky river pool below a weir . Even had a few casts at a " log " in the water , that I assumed had washed down in a recent storm . I was there for about an hour before noticing the " log " had turned to face me , and had 4 legs hanging below ! It took about an hour to slowly turn 90 degrees and face me ... very sobering indeed . Have seen many when living in Northern Territory and NW WA , but where I live now is about the end of their southern range - but I keep an eye out for them . A while ago some campers were attacked up on Cape York when sleeping in a tent on a beach , a long way from the water where they thought they were safe from crocs , camp fire and all . A big croc grabbed a lady in a tent , and started dragging her down the beach to the water . Fortunately a companion had a gun .... Otherwise they are protected by law , and their numbers have exploded since they became protected in the 1970s . Now there are many monsters about . ... There is one in the Darwin museum about 6 meters long , that was accidentally drowned by rangers in a net who were trying to re- locate it from the Finiss river to a croc farm for breeding . She was known as " Sweetheart " by the locals , and had become a problem because she used to attack outboard motors , seriously scaring the dinghy occupants .... I just don't enter any water - salt or fresh - because of crocs in the salt , and bull sharks 100s of miles upstream in fresh water . Every year there are croc and shark attacks on people , dogs , and livestock , with several fatalities .... That croc in the museum is an awesome sight - there is no way [ except luck ] that one could survive an attack from such a monster ...


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I am gobsmacked to learn that huge albacore can be found in shallow beach water over there

 

Actually we catch "false albacore" or "little tunny" from shore, what you may be calling bonito. In North Carolina we catch other species that you may be interested in though,stripers,cobia,and red drum.. In Florida they do catch snappers, as well as permit,bonefish,tarpon and other species from shore.. Haven't heard of them catching groupers and jewfish from shore in Florida ,although no doubt they probably do..

 

Have always wanted to visit oz.. Saw a fishing show years ago on discovery channel.. The guy caught all the species you mentioned.. He boatfished on the show,and caught offshore species that we catch here, like marlin,and tuna.. He also hooked a crock in a small dingy while fishing for barramundi. That thing pulled him all over until he finally broke it off.. The background scenes, as well as the types of fishing down there were unbelievable!! Thanks for the posts, always like hearing reports from down under...

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Hi Drumdum , no striped bass here , although Tassie Trumpeter may be similar . I suspect currents and distances have isolated fish species and caused them to evolve differently on different continents . For example , tarpon [Megalops cyprinoides ] occur here , and to my knowledge they are the same as the American species ; but only grow to a fraction of the size of the American fish . Like you would like to visit and fish in Oz , so would I like to see and fish in America - and likewise - the scenery over there looks stunning to me ... 


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Hi Scotsphil - yes , sure is a global site .... wondering why fishing is not so good in Scotland ?  Fished out , or lack of species of interest ? I would have thought the fishing might be good there - I've heard of cod , mackeral , etc . ....


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Hi Drumdum , no striped bass here , although Tassie Trumpeter may be similar . I suspect currents and distances have isolated fish species and caused them to evolve differently on different continents . For example , tarpon [Megalops cyprinoides ] occur here , and to my knowledge they are the same as the American species ; but only grow to a fraction of the size of the American fish . Like you would like to visit and fish in Oz , so would I like to see and fish in America - and likewise - the scenery over there looks stunning to me ... 

 

If you are surf casting, then you must be in Bundaberg or points south.

 

If you are thinking of upgrading to graphite rods, you will need to take a lot more care of them than your glass rods, theres plenty of information via google on what you need to do to protect your investment.

 

I'd suggest adding poppers to your lure collection - the SuperStrike Little Neck sinking Popper in 5-1/4 inch 2-3/8in gold, and yellow/red are absolutely deadly on Barra and Mangrove Jacks. Again there is plenty of info on how to work them.

 

Just a couple of FYI's, Jewfish here refers to a Goliath Grouper similar to a Potato cod, but for the sake of sport fish comparison, a Striper compares to a Barra in the north, and a Jewfish (Mulloway) mid and points south.

 

Before you ask, no these are not my fish unfortunately, but I've fished right around Australia and caught both of some size.

 

Jewfish - Mulloway

 

1000

 

Barramundi

1000

 

The Bluefish (Tailor) are much bigger on the North East coast here, much bigger than those caught off Fraser Island.

 

The one fish I miss most is Flathead (Platycephalus fuscus), there is nothing even remotely resembling these fish. Flathead here are a species of catfish.

 

1000

 

Fishing in the NorthEast is seasonal, unlike your sub tropical climate where you can wet a line almost year round.

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Hi Zybathegeek - you called it right , just north of Bundaberg , at a town called Tannum Sands . Good river and non - surf beach fishing at Tannum , but I like to travel a little way to Agnes Water / 1770 for rock fishing ; or further south into NSW . But best of all is the West Australian coast to the Quobba and Steep point areas , said to be the best rock fishing in the world - but of course , that is a major journey , but one I want to do again one day ......Those are impressive fish in the photos - I have in the past encountered similar sized Jewies , but to date have been bettered by them and busted off around rocks by the biggest ones .... I hope to try for them on SA beaches and the Nullabor coast some day .... Yes , poppers are top lures , even home made ones from pine catch plenty of fish . But the very best lure I have ever used was called a Boone Bird - sort of like a bibless minnow , with little wings on the sides ; they would skip across the surface like a small flying fish , launching out of the water . They drove the fish nuts , outfishing any other lure I've ever used . Sadly , they are no longer available here and I don't know if they are still made at all in USA . I would like to buy some from the states if they are still available , but the only type I can locate on line are hookless teasers .


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Wow,the jewfish in the picture is nothing like the ones here... As was said they are called Goliath grouper here.. Do you also have fish that compare to red drum and cobia? Terminology on fish is definitely different down under... :confused:

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Hi Zybathegeek - you called it right , just north of Bundaberg , at a town called Tannum Sands . Good river and non - surf beach fishing at Tannum , but I like to travel a little way to Agnes Water / 1770 for rock fishing ; or further south into NSW . But best of all is the West Australian coast to the Quobba and Steep point areas , said to be the best rock fishing in the world - but of course , that is a major journey , but one I want to do again one day ......Those are impressive fish in the photos - I have in the past encountered similar sized Jewies , but to date have been bettered by them and busted off around rocks by the biggest ones .... I hope to try for them on SA beaches and the Nullabor coast some day .... 

 

My personal best with a Jewie was a 54 pounder that I pulled off the wall in Nambucca Heads in New South, has to swim him into the little beach despite lots of bitching and whining from a bunch of wall fishermen, what happened to good old fashioned etiquette?. 11ft custom snyderglas, 30lb mono, Alvey surf reel, 40lb trace with a live poddy mullet that I floated in the channel.

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Wow,the jewfish in the picture is nothing like the ones here... As was said they are called Goliath grouper here.. Do you also have fish that compare to red drum and cobia? Terminology on fish is definitely different down under... :confused:

 

Cobia, yes, they are the same, caught on both East and West coast.

 

Red drum no equivalent that I've seen.

 

Mahi Mahi are called Dolphin fish in Australia (Colloquially known as Dollies)

 

Snapper vary in species, but in Australia generally refer to Red Snapper (Pagrus auratus), which as they age develop a hump head.

 

1000

 

Whiting are different too, Australian whiting look more like Snook than Atlantic Whiting.

 

1000

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