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two hand rod for pond and river trout

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I am looking for some guidance in making a move towards a two handed rod forpond and river trout in northern new England. Normally one would use a 4 - 6 wt rod for this application. I am starting to have some shoulder problems and am looking for a method of flycasting which might be a bit easier on the old bones. I often fish from a small boat/canoe as well as wading rivers.

 

A penny for your thoughts. Switch? Spey? What weight? These are normally small fish, rarely over 16".

 

Thanks -

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For the past few years I have been using a 4wt Echo Switch rod for exactly what you are talking about in freshwater. I am not a fan of switch rods for the salt but I have nothing but good things to say about this rod and a Skagit line with poly leaders for freshwater applications. I mostly overhead cast this setup but it will do off the water casts as well when needed.

 

I just went with the Rajeff Sports airflo line recommendations and have had no issues at all. I carry 2 reels one with a head system and one for a full length line setup. The head system I use both Skagit and Scandi lines with various poly leaders.

 

Hope this helps...

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Meiser makes the highlander series switch in a 10'6" 3/4 that is an excellent rod for light trout fishing. I use One with a 6wt outbound short floater for indicador fishing , high stick nymphing and fishing streamers. The rod casts well O/H Skagit and scandi with this line you just need to mark the ammount of line to leave out of the tip for the type of cast you are using.

 

A finished rod is a bit pricey at about 600 but the blanks are a bargain at under 150 . If you can build your own or know someone who could wrap one up for a bottle of single malt you can be into one of the finest light two handers made for less than $300

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Thanks guys -

 

You both refer to skagit and scandi lines. What are the differences and advantages of each?

 

Also - I will be using a floating line probably 70% of the time, if that affects li e decisions.

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Honestly, that end of this game is relatively new to me but from what I can compare it too is a Skagit is like a short basssbug/ weight forward design and the Scandi is a longer more delicate taper like a double taper line. I find I use the Skagit and the full length Rio outbound lines the most for what I do but then again I tend to power my casts far more than finesse them ;)

 

I have used the Scandi head maybe 4 times over the past few years and those times were in areas where the fish were spooky and the spots would jump off them if the line splat down too hard on the surface.

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Jim is spot on with his descriptions of the two lines . Each is designed for a specific casting style. Both Skagit and Scandinavian casting depend on a portion of the line being on the water for loading the rod on the backcast. Kind of a modified roll cast that allows you to shoot alot of line on your delivery or forward cast. Either type of line can be used like you would a single hand for an overhead back cast.

 

Search for "snap-t, and double spey" on YouTube for examples of Skagit casts and "skandi" for examples of skandinavian or touch and go type casting.

 

If you just want to regular old overhead cast with 2 hands consider a regular weight foreward single hand shooting head type line like the Rio outbound or airflow 40+ but remember that with single handed lines the number ratings are not the same as a 2 handed rod and you should buy a line by how much it actually weighs in grains to match the "grain window " or how much weight the rod was designed to cast .

 

The great thing about the outbound and 40+ is they work fairly well for all 3 casting styles with overhead being the best followed by scandi style then Skagit.

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