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all clad copper core burning question

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i have a set of all clad copper core and it seems like anytime i pan fry or saute anything the food sticks and burns. i've tried several different things, lowering the heat, raising the heat, adding more oil, adding food while oil is cold, adding food while oil is hot and it seems like no matter what i do the food sticks and burns. am i missing something or is this just how it works.

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try this-

 

hot pan, cold oil, is the old adage, but just not really smoking hot. don't touch food you are searing for a few minutes, it will release

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try this-

 

hot pan, cold oil, is the old adage, but just not really smoking hot. don't touch food you are searing for a few minutes, it will release

[quote

i'll have to try that.

 

 

 

name=Reed422" url="/t/889590/all-clad-copper-core-burning-question#post_10106717]What are you cooking?

 

 

i've put sausage, garlic, veggies, breaded fish, and they all stick.

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Try using a fish spatula.  What I learned from a guy at a cooking store was to put oil in a pan, put it on high and then turn down to medium after it has gotten real hot.  Also like Jim said you can't turn the food too soon or it will stick.  It lets go when it's ready.



 



1000

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gonna try both ways. just curious if anyone else with the copper core or aluminum core has the same problems.

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The core material shouldn't have anything to do with it - food's only touching the steel on the cook surface. My guess is that you've scrubbed the things with a harsh abrasive like the backside of a sponge to the point where the surface is scuffed and porous in which case virtually any food is going to be able to make a nice strong mechanical bond with the surface and affix itself there. Hold the pan up to your face with a light behind you and look for the reflection - if you see a blurry smudge instead of a clean, crisp reflected image then that's your problem. Here's what you do.....

 

You need to recondition that surface, similar to how you'd season a cast iron pan. Keep cooking with it, but nothing containing pork or sugars or anything else that you know likes to stick, make sure the pan is well heated and a little hotter than you'd normally have it, and alternate between different types of fats - butter, chicken fat, olive oil. When cooking, try not to aggressively scrape at the bottom with anything metal, and allow your meats to 'release' on their own. When you're done using it wipe it down with a paper towel or damp sponge - don't put in in the sink, soak it, scrub at it with an abrasive pad, just wipe it out, leaving a little oil or grease on the surface. if there's something really stuck to it pour a little pile of course salt on it and then scrub it off using a dry paper towel.

 

If you treat it this way for a month or so the acids in your food and interaction with oxygen in the air will gradually etch the surface of the pan and smooth out those microscopic scratches that your food is bonding to. Unfortunately, since it's stainless, this process happens a bit slower than it does with non-stainless pans like cast irons or my beloved DeBuyers, but it does happen, and you can get that surface nice and slick again. Once you get it there you can start washing it normally again, just don't use anything on it that's harder than the metal, like the green side of a sponge - instead, do the salt thing - it's super abrasive but not harder than steel and will never scratch it.

 

$0.02

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So a plastic scrub sponge is going to make stainless steel "rough and porous" ????? I don't think so.

 

 

In my estimation let the oil heat up, but not quite as high a temp as normal, put the food in, and don't touch the food for a bit. It will caramelize a bit and then release. Keeping an eye on the color of the smoke is key to prevent burning.......if will go from steam to smoke slowly. You don't need really high heat to get a good carmelization w these pans. If that doesn't work out go get one of their non-sticks.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Paul_M View Post

So a plastic scrub sponge is going to make stainless steel "rough and porous" ????? I don't think so.

In my estimation let the oil heat up, but not quite as high a temp as normal, put the food in, and don't touch the food for a bit. It will caramelize a bit and then release. Keeping an eye on the color of the smoke is key to prevent burning.......if will go from steam to smoke slowly. You don't need really high heat to get a good carmelization w these pans. If that doesn't work out go get one of their non-sticks.



I'm not buying it either.  I'll use a copper scrubby or steel wool and my food doesn't stick when I do things properly (when I do things properly).


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Article today about this on "Serious Eats" in Food Lab. Proteins in the food react with the pan's surface on a molecular level. Nothing to do at all with filling pores in the surface. Cooked proteins do not interact with the pan as uncooked do. Oil at the right temperature helps to cook the proteins before they contact and can interact with the pan's surface. Hot pan/cold oil is a myth they say, it's all in having the oil at the right temperature before introducing the protein. Right temp depends on what food and what pan surface.

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some good suggestions. i'm gonna have to try a few of them. most of my frying i do in a cast iron anyway but when doing something that requires fry then add liquid i use the all clad. dont want to mess the cast iron up. i'll have to see what works. looks like i opened a can of worms on a good way to use stainless.

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the backside of a sponge isn't just plastic - there's super hard abrasive compounds in there too. go find a nice shiny peice of steel, hell, use a nice new pan, and scrub at it with a fresh sponge - it'll tear the **** out of that steel. I've used those things to take out 600 grit swirl marks on a hardened carbon steel blade - don't tell me they ain't gonna scuff up his all-clads....

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I'm not buying it either.  I'll use a copper scrubby or steel wool and my food doesn't stick when I do things properly (when I do things properly).

 

neither of which are as hard as the surface of the pan :read:

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