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r111

Dig up your own blood/sand worms

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A smallish digging implement (one of those gardening tools) and few mins of your time, at low(ish) tide , could fetch you a dozen of nice worms - this way you dont have to spend $10+ at bait shop.



 



Other day I got me some using nuttin but a clam knife (yep, with a 4" flat blade) in the Back (aka RB). The incoming will hide the traces of the crime you comited.



 



Toy-size shovel (get one with a pointy end): few bux (or steal one from yer gardening lovin wife)



Taking the "living off the fat of the ocean" one step further: priceless.


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I usually fish once a week - so if I spend the $$, I end up using like 5% of the worms, w/o any way to keep them alive for the next week. This requires 0 effort - literally poking/turning at mud with a 4" clam knife gets you worms in no time flat, no need to break one's back. Try it next time you're out.


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I was flipping rocks at the dropping tide yesterday. Picked up some more jumbo asian crabs for tog and saw some nice fat bloodworms right under the rocks. I probably could've come away with a dozen or more in half hour but I'm done with the worm game.

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Tapeworms...actually they are

 

Scientific name: Cerebratulus lacteus

Common name: Milky ribbon worm

Description:

 

The milky ribbon worm is a predatory marine worm that uses its sticky proboscis to attacks its prey. These worms are a milky-white or colour but are occasionally found to be pinkish. They can grow to a length of 48 inches. The worms prey upon other small benthic marine animals, sometimes including clams. They do so by extending their slender sticky proboscis through the grooved underside of their head. This means of subsistence allows them to flourish in the subtidal depths as well as the low intertidal mudflats and sandy beaches. They can be found anywhere and everywhere along the Atlantic coastline in healthy abundance and are a key component in many if not all intertidal ecosystems.

 

A search here on SOL will give lots of info. March and April every year.

 

[ATTACHMENT=8955]tapeworm.jpg (142k. jpg file)[/ATTACHMENT]

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Tapeworms..... nasty slimey things, but winter flounder literally lose their minds over them.

And the only way I know of to get em is to dig your own

 

But for two lousy fish there's not much point :(

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